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By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
Baltimore native Dr. Sherell Mason knew she wanted to return to her hometown to provide community medical care, but the scholarship and loan repayment she received through the National Health Service Corps made that decision a lot easier. Now, more medical, dental and mental health care professionals will be able to take advantage of financial assistance through the federal program, thanks to an infusion of $290 million through the Affordable Care Act, announced Monday in West Baltimore.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 26, 2014
Kudos to letter writer Patricia M. Davidson of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing for raising awareness about the role of nursing in the Ebola outbreak ( "This is not crazy; this is nursing," Aug. 18). Nurses, particularly African nurses, are on the frontline against Ebola in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria, the countries most impacted by the recent outbreak. They are looking fear in the face as they try to do what they do best - care for individuals, families and communities.
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NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2003
Maryland lawmakers are considering clamping down on the fancy meals, theater tickets and expensive trips lavished on doctors by pharmaceutical companies trying to persuade health care professionals to prescribe their medications. "The system bothers me," said Del. Charles R. Boutin, a Harford County Republican. "Everyone involved may have been trapped in a cycle of competitive action." Boutin is the sponsor of a bill that would prevent physicians, nurse practitioners and pharmacists from accepting gifts worth more than $50 from pharmaceutical companies.
EXPLORE
January 9, 2013
Harford County Executive David R. Craig got his flue shot, and he's urging all Harford residents to get one as well. His vaccination was administered by the Harford County Health Department in Bel Air. "Flu season is upon us and I join with the Harford County Health Department in urging citizens to take the opportunity to get vaccinated," Craig said. "Vaccination is especially important for people at high risk of serious flu complications. " Each year in the United States nearly 200,000 people are hospitalized from complications from the flu. The Center for Disease Control (CDC)
NEWS
November 6, 2001
The public is invited to a community meeting at 7 o'clock this evening at the Pikesville Hilton, where a panel of experts will discuss the possible threat of biological agents and answer questions. At 7:30 p.m. Thursday, the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Maimonides Society will hold a bioterrorism seminar for health care professionals at Beth El Congregation, including a review of resources and protocols.
EXPLORE
January 9, 2013
Harford County Executive David R. Craig got his flue shot, and he's urging all Harford residents to get one as well. His vaccination was administered by the Harford County Health Department in Bel Air. "Flu season is upon us and I join with the Harford County Health Department in urging citizens to take the opportunity to get vaccinated," Craig said. "Vaccination is especially important for people at high risk of serious flu complications. " Each year in the United States nearly 200,000 people are hospitalized from complications from the flu. The Center for Disease Control (CDC)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- There is no medical or scientific justification for restricting the practice of AIDS-infected health care professionals, nor should they be forced to tell their patients that they carry the virus, the National Commission on AIDS said yesterday.The commission also opposed mandatory AIDS testing of health workers, urging instead that any such testing be voluntary.The best way to prevent transmission of the virus by health care workers was through strict adherence to normal infection control procedures, the commission said, adding that "no effort should be spared" to ensure that all health care professionals are trained in and apply so-called universal precautions.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
Kudos to letter writer Patricia M. Davidson of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing for raising awareness about the role of nursing in the Ebola outbreak ( "This is not crazy; this is nursing," Aug. 18). Nurses, particularly African nurses, are on the frontline against Ebola in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria, the countries most impacted by the recent outbreak. They are looking fear in the face as they try to do what they do best - care for individuals, families and communities.
FEATURES
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,Universal Press Syndicate | December 9, 1991
Since 1938, under one name or another, the Society for the Right to Die has worked through the legislative and judicial processes to ensure that Americans could refuse medical treatment that would prolong their lives against their will.In 1967, the Euthanasia Educational Fund later to become Concern for Dying was founded to educate Americans about end-of-life choices that were already facing increasing numbers of people.In recent years, the two groups have worked side by side separate organizations tackling different aspects of their common cause of helping Americans come to grips with life-and-death decisions about medical care.
NEWS
By Catherine E. Pugh and Catherine E. Pugh,1991 The Baltimore Sun Company | August 27, 1991
Every year around this time we usually publish a black arts and entertainment section. However, this year we've decided to focus on black health issues because there is a crisis in the black community regarding health care and preventive health care measures.Cardiovascular disease, diabetes, infant mortality, cancer, substance abuse and AIDS are gripping the black community, and thus are the focus of this issue. These illnesses, according to the Heckler-Malone report, a national study by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, account for 62 percent of deaths in the black community.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
Baltimore native Dr. Sherell Mason knew she wanted to return to her hometown to provide community medical care, but the scholarship and loan repayment she received through the National Health Service Corps made that decision a lot easier. Now, more medical, dental and mental health care professionals will be able to take advantage of financial assistance through the federal program, thanks to an infusion of $290 million through the Affordable Care Act, announced Monday in West Baltimore.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
With heated debates about reforming health care swirling across the country, professors from the University of Maryland's graduate schools told more than 200 students about how proposed changes might affect their future careers in medicine, dentistry, nursing, law, pharmacy and social work at a panel discussion Thursday night in downtown Baltimore. All the professors agreed that the U.S. health care system needs to be reformed. "We do need to control spiraling costs, but we don't want to do that at the cost of stifling innovation," said Dr. Mandeep R. Mehra, professor and head of cardiology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Larry.carson@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
Maryland residents looking for a primary care doctor have a harder task every day, as the number of family doctors continues to shrink and those still practicing say they are squeezed for time and money by insurance companies and forced to shortchange patients. "The patients don't know what's going on," said Dr. Lindiwe Greenwood, a solo practitioner in Columbia. "They don't know why we won't take Medicaid." She was among a group of doctors and other health care professionals who met recently to make recommendations to the General Assembly on how to address a growing crisis in this vital main link between patients and medical care.
NEWS
November 13, 2008
Don't doctors deserve a choice on abortion? The acerbic editorial "Bush rules" (Nov. 11) ironically accuses the Bush administration of attacking "personal rights" and then lambastes the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for proposing a regulation to protect the civil rights of health care professionals. The Baltimore Sun protests "extending the right to refuse to participate in an abortion to include an array of health care workers." Which medical professionals does the paper deem unworthy of civil rights so that they should be forced to violate their conscience and the Hippocratic Oath?
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Peterson and Jonathan Peterson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 16, 2008
"I had the feeling that all wasn't well with my father," Claire Milne recalled. It was Christmastime in 2003, and Milne had flown from her London home to visit her 82-year-old father in Maryland. Milne noticed that her dad struggled to stay upright as he walked, early signs of a mysterious neurological condition. Over the next four years, Milne, 56, would travel across the Atlantic every few months to watch over him, standing by during hospital stays, offering support to her ailing stepmother as well.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2003
Maryland lawmakers are considering clamping down on the fancy meals, theater tickets and expensive trips lavished on doctors by pharmaceutical companies trying to persuade health care professionals to prescribe their medications. "The system bothers me," said Del. Charles R. Boutin, a Harford County Republican. "Everyone involved may have been trapped in a cycle of competitive action." Boutin is the sponsor of a bill that would prevent physicians, nurse practitioners and pharmacists from accepting gifts worth more than $50 from pharmaceutical companies.
NEWS
May 27, 1997
Rate-setting can harm patient careAs a consumer and a future occupational therapist, I am concerned about Maryland's use of a rate-setting commission to regulate hospital costs (news story, March 6).I understand the concern for the rising costs, but don't believe the commission is taking all of the aspects of health care delivery into account.As a result of the correction factor, state hospitals will cut staff salaries, making patient care suffer tremendously.Health care professionals will be forced to limit the amount of care rendered, needed patient services won't be available, and the more expensive staff will be let go, leaving unqualified personnel to administer care.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
Richard Gardiner stood out from most of the prospective applicants who stopped at the Peace Corps recruiting booth in the East Wing Lobby of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health yesterday.Most of the people visiting the booth were students in their 20s. Mr. Gardiner is a 50-year-old employee of the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. He said he did not feel out of place, however."I know far more than they do. At this stage in life, I have super confidence," he said.Peace Corps officials kicked off a recruiting drive in the Baltimore area yesterday morning by opening a recruiting booth at the Hopkins.
NEWS
By Sue du Pont and Sue du Pont,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2002
JUST AS the cool autumn weather rolled into our area, Annapolis resident Janice Fisher headed to the Caribbean. The weather there was warm, but her trip was no vacation. Fisher and four other health care professionals were on a mission to take care of infants and children at an orphanage in Haiti. In four days, Fisher, a physical therapist at Hospital for Sick Children in Washington, and a doctor, two nurses, and a nutritionist evaluated and treated more than 375 children and a few adults.
NEWS
November 6, 2001
The public is invited to a community meeting at 7 o'clock this evening at the Pikesville Hilton, where a panel of experts will discuss the possible threat of biological agents and answer questions. At 7:30 p.m. Thursday, the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Maimonides Society will hold a bioterrorism seminar for health care professionals at Beth El Congregation, including a review of resources and protocols.
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