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NEWS
By Gerard Anderson | September 6, 2009
Fifteen years ago, Harry and Louise were the voice of the health care industry opposed to health reform. Today, Harry and Louise have endorsed health care reform, and most of the health care industry is on board. And the pharmaceutical industry is now paying for advertisements promoting health reforms. What gives? Perhaps the industry has a canny ability to negotiate secret deals to protect its interests. We need to know the price we are paying. For example, the pharmaceutical industry appears to have negotiated a secret deal to provide $80 billion in alleged savings over the next 10 years.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
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NEWS
By Barbara R. Heller | March 13, 2001
THE U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and health experts recently warned Congress that the nation's pool of registered nurses would shrink steadily over the next 20 years. This crisis of epic proportions will touch every man, woman and child in America. Who will care for the elderly, the newborn, and the chronically ill? We have never seen a nursing shortage of this magnitude. Health facilities in Baltimore and throughout the state are already struggling to fill nursing positions.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
According to its mission statement, Johns Hopkins Hospital seeks "to afford solace and enhance the surrounding community. " This goal is hardly consistent with the poverty-level wages paid by that fine institution to its core employees ( "Balancing priorities and resources at Johns Hopkins," April 11). Twenty-five percent of the employees who engaged in a three-day strike last week earn so little that they are officially considered to be living in poverty while 70 percent of them earn so little that they qualify for food stamps.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Howard Community College is part of a three-college consortium that will launch a Mount Airy-based health care training center to propel students into those high-demand careers, HCC officials said. On Monday, HCC joined Carroll and Frederick community colleges and state elected officials for the groundbreaking of the Mount Airy College Center for Health Care Education. The facility, which is slated to open in the fall of 2012, will provide health care-related programs to students from the three community colleges at a site that school officials say is easily accessible.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 13, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush announced yesterday that he would allow sweeping rules to protect the privacy of medical records to go into effect tomorrow. But he said the rules, issued by President Bill Clinton, could be modified later to address "legitimate concerns" of the health care industry. By allowing the rules to take effect, despite the administration's view that some provisions are unworkable, Bush avoided the firestorm of criticism that surrounded the rollback of other Clinton administration policies.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
Members of a statewide coalition formed after the death of a 12-year-old boy from Prince George's County from an untreated tooth infection unveiled a plan Tuesday to improve access to dental care. The plan from the Maryland Dental Action Coalition builds on one formed in 2007 after the death of Deamonte Driver, which addressed the immediate shortage of oral care professionals who would treat low-income children by increasing the Medicaid reimbursement, streamlining the system and expanding safety net programs.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
The rates hospitals can charge for care would remain flat for the first six months of 2014 amid uncertainty over hospitals' financial stability and proposed changes in how they are compensated, under a draft recommendation made by a state panel Wednesday. Maryland's hospital rate-setting agency typically sets the terms for hospitals' reimbursement on an annual basis, but took a more tentative approach because of the upheaval. Earlier this year, most state hospitals were given a 1.65 percent increase in rates for the first half of fiscal year 2014, which began in July, and the Health Services Cost Review Commission is suggesting that rates remain the same for the second half.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
According to its mission statement, Johns Hopkins Hospital seeks "to afford solace and enhance the surrounding community. " This goal is hardly consistent with the poverty-level wages paid by that fine institution to its core employees ( "Balancing priorities and resources at Johns Hopkins," April 11). Twenty-five percent of the employees who engaged in a three-day strike last week earn so little that they are officially considered to be living in poverty while 70 percent of them earn so little that they qualify for food stamps.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 6, 2003
WASHINGTON - When Dr. Stephen C. Albrecht of Olympia, Wash., called a hospital in Tacoma recently to inquire about one of his patients, an 18-year- old being treated for an infectious disease, he had trouble getting information. Meanwhile, under a new policy at the Hebrew Home of Greater Washington, a nursing home in Rockville, callers can get information about patients only if they have a password. And Dr. Matthew J. Messina, a dentist in Fairview Park, Ohio, near Cleveland, said he had changed the schedule posted each day in his treatment room so patients would be identified only by their first names.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
When Mark Pressman was a student trying to settle on a career, a Temple graduate counseled him to stay away from elder care. The advice didn't stick. Today, Pressman, 64, is the executive director of North Oaks, a continuing care retirement community in Pikesville where he has worked since 2007. North Oaks, owned and managed by Des Moines, Iowa-based Life Care Services, has capacity for about 230 people, with 177 independent apartments and about 50 spots in its assisted-care unit, Autumn Ridge Health Center.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
The rates hospitals can charge for care would remain flat for the first six months of 2014 amid uncertainty over hospitals' financial stability and proposed changes in how they are compensated, under a draft recommendation made by a state panel Wednesday. Maryland's hospital rate-setting agency typically sets the terms for hospitals' reimbursement on an annual basis, but took a more tentative approach because of the upheaval. Earlier this year, most state hospitals were given a 1.65 percent increase in rates for the first half of fiscal year 2014, which began in July, and the Health Services Cost Review Commission is suggesting that rates remain the same for the second half.
EXPLORE
Aegis report | May 6, 2013
Harford Community College has received a $25,000 grant from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield to support development of an electronic health records system that will bolster training of the institution's nearly 2,200 Nursing and Allied Health students. The grant for Harford's Emerging Technologies Project -- Electronic Health Records will enable HCC to acquire the high-tech equipment necessary to launch the project across the Allied Health and Nursing curricula and provide state-of-the-art education in a crucial workforce skill for the health care industry.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2012
Those looking to lose weight, quit smoking or keep tabs on a malady have a lot of choices in the smartphone app stores. Choosing one that's beneficial is more of a problem. Science is still trying to catch up to the market for mobile health applications, software that runs on mobile devices such as iPhones, Androids and tablets, which has produced tens of thousands of possible ways to achieve better health for free or a fee. One of the broadest efforts to assess "mHealth" strategies is being made by dozens of faculty, staff and students in multiple departments at the Johns Hopkins University, which has 49 official studies under way in Baltimore and around the world as part of its Global mHealth Initiative.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
Howard Community College is part of a three-college consortium that will launch a Mount Airy-based health care training center to propel students into those high-demand careers, HCC officials said. On Monday, HCC joined Carroll and Frederick community colleges and state elected officials for the groundbreaking of the Mount Airy College Center for Health Care Education. The facility, which is slated to open in the fall of 2012, will provide health care-related programs to students from the three community colleges at a site that school officials say is easily accessible.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2011
Members of a statewide coalition formed after the death of a 12-year-old boy from Prince George's County from an untreated tooth infection unveiled a plan Tuesday to improve access to dental care. The plan from the Maryland Dental Action Coalition builds on one formed in 2007 after the death of Deamonte Driver, which addressed the immediate shortage of oral care professionals who would treat low-income children by increasing the Medicaid reimbursement, streamlining the system and expanding safety net programs.
EXPLORE
Aegis report | May 6, 2013
Harford Community College has received a $25,000 grant from CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield to support development of an electronic health records system that will bolster training of the institution's nearly 2,200 Nursing and Allied Health students. The grant for Harford's Emerging Technologies Project -- Electronic Health Records will enable HCC to acquire the high-tech equipment necessary to launch the project across the Allied Health and Nursing curricula and provide state-of-the-art education in a crucial workforce skill for the health care industry.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 20, 2000
WASHINGTON -- As Congress ponders cures for complaints about health care, patients are not sitting idly in an anteroom, awaiting results. With the help of inventive lawyers, they are rushing to courts, making some progress toward a patient's "bill of rights." The wave of lawsuits, aimed at the managed health care industry, grows out of rising suspicions by many patients that the financial bottom line, not a medical chart, determines the care they receive -- or don't receive -- from doctors or health groups.
NEWS
By Gerard Anderson | September 6, 2009
Fifteen years ago, Harry and Louise were the voice of the health care industry opposed to health reform. Today, Harry and Louise have endorsed health care reform, and most of the health care industry is on board. And the pharmaceutical industry is now paying for advertisements promoting health reforms. What gives? Perhaps the industry has a canny ability to negotiate secret deals to protect its interests. We need to know the price we are paying. For example, the pharmaceutical industry appears to have negotiated a secret deal to provide $80 billion in alleged savings over the next 10 years.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2003
A news conference scheduled for this morning at City Hall was canceled yesterday after the union that was to be host announced that it would take aim at Johns Hopkins Hospital as "the Wal-Mart of the health care industry" and Mayor Martin O'Malley backed out of the event. Service Employees International Union District 1199E-DC in Baltimore issued a news release that described the participation of the mayor and U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat who also leads the Congressional Black Caucus, in an event marking today as International Human Rights Day. SEIU is negotiating a contract with Johns Hopkins, where it represents more than 1,500 workers in housekeeping, maintenance, nutrition and other areas.
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