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NEWS
May 17, 1991
Of 348 Evening Sun readers and other callers to SUNDIAL yesterday, 271, or 77 percent believed that there should be guaranteed health care for everyone in the United States, and 77, or 22 percent disagreed.The American Medical Association has endorsed reforming the nation's health-care system to guarantee health care for everyone. The AMA suggested that government and business working together might supply health insurance for all."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as a scientific public opinion poll would be.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Forty health care workers in Mali are receiving a vaccine that could guard against the Ebola virus as a University of Maryland School of Medicine center launches the first human trials of the experimental vaccine. One person received the vaccine Wednesday, two more were expected to receive it Thursday and dozens more are scheduled to follow in the coming weeks. The inoculation was developed at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases in Bethesda using an inert virus that is coated in an Ebola protein, so the body builds immunity to the deadly virus.
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NEWS
May 30, 1993
Gov. William Donald Schaefer last week handed the president of Johns Hopkins University an enormous task: writing the rules for revamping much of Maryland's health-care industry. Yet if anyone is up to this assignment, it is William C. Richardson.Dr. Richardson not only focused on health-services management for his MBA and doctorate, he has studied and written extensively on medical care for the poor, health maintenance organizations and the cost-effectiveness of primary-care network models.
NEWS
By Julie Stanik-Hutt, Janet Selway and Andrea Schram | October 5, 2014
In the last few weeks we've heard a lot about the Ebola epidemic and work to contain its spread and potentially tragic consequences. But influenza is a preventable infectious disease that represents a much greater risk to the health of Marylanders. Influenza (flu) is a seasonal disease that is most common in the winter and spring. Last year, almost 25,000 Marylanders sought care for flu symptoms. Anyone can get sick from the flu, but preschool age children (under 5 years of age), pregnant women and senior citizens are especially vulnerable to getting sick from influenza.
NEWS
February 2, 1992
From: Beverly B. ByronU.S. Congress6th DistrictWashingtonI would like to thank all of those who attended the health-care town meeting in Hagerstown on Jan. 14.The turnout of some 200 people last week as compared to the very few who attended my four health-care forums in 1990 impressively demonstrates that health care has taken its place on our national agenda.Nearly 250 members of Congress held town meetings that night to hear from their constituents on where we go from here on health care.
NEWS
February 3, 1991
Health-care costs are spiraling upward again, driven by catastrophic illness claims and the mushrooming use of mental health and substance abuse services. Corporate medical bills soared 21.6 percent last year: The average company spends more than a quarter of its net earnings on health care. If the cost curve continues on this course, medical benefits will rise to intolerable levels -- an estimated $22,000 per worker by the year 2000.Cost containment, the magic bullet of the '80s, hasn't worked.
NEWS
By RAY JENKINSCO: RAY JENKINS | September 8, 1991
It's virtually a given these days that the uppermost personal concern of the vast majority of Americans, other than the obvious one of earning a regular paycheck, is affordable health care. Only the wealthiest can escape the haunting fear that a single family illness, even a common one like cancer, can in a matter of weeks turn relative economic security into a life doomed to penury.In retrospect it's easy to see what happened: Thirty years ago, a tacit compact was reached that government would pay for the health care of the poor (through Medicaid)
NEWS
February 18, 1992
When it comes to finding an answer to the nation's health-care problem, Maryland is indeed "America in miniature." The same three-prolonged debate taking place in Congress is also being argued in Annapolis' State House. And like their counterparts in Washington, Maryland legislators are far from reaching a consensus.Still, the three days of public hearings in the House Economic Matters Committee last week proved an eye-opener for a number of lawmakers and made it clear that only one of the three plans discussed has any chance of advancing in this legislative session.
NEWS
By DANIEL BERGER | December 31, 1994
The health-care delivery industries are given a respite. Last autumn, until the Clinton health-care bill failed, they were up in arms, guarding their interests from harm. Now the storm has departed as rapidly as it came.Since the conservative Republican congressional victory in November, health care has gone off the screen. The Republicans are talking about which programs to abolish, not what to create.Don't be fooled. The health-care issue is not dead. Small bits of it are wriggling. The rest is dormant -- a virus festering unseen, liable to erupt at some unexpected time.
NEWS
April 4, 1994
There's a knock-down, drag-out fight going on in the hallways of Annapolis over a health-care proposal that epitomizes the kinds of agonizing decisions individuals in our society have to make. Proponents of the bill say it gives patients the absolute right to choose a health-care provider. Opponents say the bill will demolish cost-containment efforts and add hundreds of millions of dollars to the cost of obtaining health care.In an ideal setting, the proponents' argument would triumph. Americans have been spoiled by a health-care system that has enabled them to pick and choose their physicians at will without much thought about paying for it. After all, insurance paid nearly all the bill.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
NEWS
October 3, 2014
A reader argues that overspending is the problem in Annapolis ( "Maryland's spending problem ," Sept. 29). This is a constant refrain, but then the inevitable question arises: Exactly what programs should be cut? Education? Then your kids will attend overcrowded classrooms. Transportation? Then roads will have more potholes and your commute will take longer. State inspectors? Then your food is more likely to be spoiled and your parents will be living in unsupervised retirement communities.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
It is during times of crisis that we see the very "best" in our fellow Americans. First responders and other heroic professionals routinely surprise us with tremendous and often unexpected acts. The University of Maryland Shore Regional Health System represents an often overlooked group of medical professionals who perform such acts every day. My father recently suffered a massive stroke and was admitted to Shore Regional Health's Easton facility. We do not yet know whether he will survive, but we are certain he could receive no finer care.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
A former Arizona state senator named Russell Pearce resigned as vice chairman of the state's Republican Party recently because he suggested that if he ran Medicaid, the first thing he'd do would be to put female recipients on birth control implants or require tubal ligation. Then he'd test all recipients for drugs and alcohol. If you want to reproduce or use drugs or alcohol, he reportedly told listeners on his radio show, "then get a job. " It's not surprising that a conservative Republican might perceive poor people as lazy and irresponsible, but the attack on Medicaid — the government-financed insurance program for the poor and working poor and, of course, the possibility of forced female sterility — was beyond the pale.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
The owner of an Owings Mills medical firm is accused of defrauding Medicare and Medicaid of more than $7.5 million in a federal indictment unsealed Monday. Federal prosecutors say Alpha Diagnostics owner Rafael Chikvashvili, 67, of Baltimore created false examination reports, submitted insurance claims for medical procedures that were never performed by licensed physicians, and overbilled Medicare and Medicaid, among other fraudulent acts. The X-ray company's offices in Owings Mills and Harrisburg, Pa., were raided last October by the FBI. Chikvashvili directed his employees, who were not doctors, to interpret X-rays, medical tests, ultrasounds and cardiological exams, rather than paying licensed physicians to do the work, the indictment alleged.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
John Bruce Innes Jr., a former marketing executive for Genesis Health Ventures who was later a senior housing consultant, died July 22 of brain injuries suffered in a fall while he was vacationing in Greece. The Lutherville resident was 70. Born in Philadelphia and raised in Springfield, Pa., he was the son of John B. Innes Sr., a chemist, and Marion Rohrer Innes, a teacher. A 1962 graduate of Springfield High School, where he was on the school's newspaper editing staff, he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree at George Washington University, where he belonged to the Kappa Sigma Fraternity and was Inter-Fraternity Council president.
NEWS
By DAVID EWING DUNCAN | April 12, 1995
The word is that health reform died last year because private industry is reforming itself.If only it were true.What's really happening is far more alarming as several trends in health care track across a grid like roaring locomotives on a collision course. Even Speaker Newt Gingrich admitted as much in a speech to the National Hospital Association. Insisting ''we need to rethink our health system,'' Mr. Gingrich warned that current cost trends will result in a ''financial crash.''Yet Republicans continue to behave -- in the words of Bob Dole last spring -- as if ''there is no health-care crisis.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
The medical system that provides care to Maryland's veterans signed a one-year contract with Evergreen Health Care in Baltimore to offer primary health services to new patients, federal and co-op officials said Thursday. The $485,000 contract aims to cut down on wait times that had become some of the worst in the nation. A June audit found Central Maryland's veterans were waiting an average of 80 days to see a primary-care doctor for an initial visit, the fourth longest wait in the nation.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
Kudos to letter writer Patricia M. Davidson of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing for raising awareness about the role of nursing in the Ebola outbreak ( "This is not crazy; this is nursing," Aug. 18). Nurses, particularly African nurses, are on the frontline against Ebola in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria, the countries most impacted by the recent outbreak. They are looking fear in the face as they try to do what they do best - care for individuals, families and communities.
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