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By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
Private mental health providers in Carroll County are gearing up to absorb more than 500 patients who will need to arrange for psychiatric care before June 30, when the county Health Department plans to close its mental health bureau.The transition process, which began this month, is expected to be complete by the middle of May.Meanwhile, mental health providers are competing for patients and scrambling to have services in place for their new clients."It's a very changing marketplace," said Fred Chanteau, president and chief executive officer of Affiliated Sante Group of Montgomery County.
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NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1998
Another 100 people who may have been stricken by bacteria in food served at the Turf Valley Resort and Conference Center in Ellicott City last weekend flooded the Howard County Department of Health yesterday with calls seeking information on the outbreak.That brings to more than 200 the number of people who may have suffered stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting after attending half a dozen events at the golf resort on U.S. 40 Saturday."Every time I turn around, I see one of our nurses on the phone filling out a report," said Dr. Willa Brown, acting health officer for the department's Bureau of Personal Health.
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NEWS
December 8, 1992
Mental Health Bureau helps to stop suicideThe Mental Health Bureau of the Health Department administers a county government-funded Suicide Prevention Program for those under 21 deemed to be at-risk.The program is available by calling the Health Department at 876-4750 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays, and asking for Dean C. Wolf, coordinator of the Child and Adolescent Unit.After normal working hours, and on holidays and weekends, those needing help may call the Emergency Operations Center at 911. Maryland youths can reach a crisis counselor 24 hours a day by calling the statewide hot line, (800)
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
Private mental health providers in Carroll County are gearing up to absorb more than 500 patients who will need to arrange for psychiatric care before June 30, when the county Health Department plans to close its mental health bureau.The transition process, which began this month, is expected to be complete by the middle of May.Meanwhile, mental health providers are competing for patients and scrambling to have services in place for their new clients."It's a very changing marketplace," said Fred Chanteau, president and chief executive officer of Affiliated Sante Group of Montgomery County.
NEWS
July 31, 1991
The Carroll County Government funds a suicide prevention program administered and monitored by the Mental Health Bureau of the Carroll County Health Department.The target population of this program is younger than 21 who are in a life-threatening situation.Call the Carroll County Health Department at 876-4750 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays and asking for Dean C. Wolf, coordinator of the Child and Adolescent Unit.The Emergency Operations Center can be reached at 911 after normal working hours, holidays and weekends.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
The Carroll County Health Department will stop providing mental health services by June 30, a move that will eliminate the jobs of 40 employees who provide treatment to about 1,000 clients.Beginning Feb. 10, the department will no longer accept new mental health admissions, and over the next few months county health officials plan to refer current patients to private providers in the county."We hope to have most of our patients transitioned out to other programs and therapists by April," said acting county health officer Larry L. Leitch.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
Carroll County's mental health advisory committee voted yesterday to ask the county commissioners to create a new agency with the financial clout to change how county residents receive mental health services.The agency, which would be called a core service agency, is proposed as a private, nonprofit group that would distribute approximately $2.2 million a year that Carroll agencies receive from the state Mental Hygiene Administration to provide community mental health services."The core service agency would have a lot of flexibility and power to distribute or redistribute mental health dollars," said Howard Held, director of the county Health Department's Mental Health Bureau.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | September 22, 1991
A federal grant will enable the county Mental Health Bureau to expand services this fall to help homeless people who are mentally ill.Through Projects for Assistance in the Transition from Homelessness,or PATH, additional efforts will be made on behalf of the homeless mentally ill, said Howard Held, director of the Mental Health Bureau.The bureau will use the money to help the homeless in county shelters who are having difficulty coping."These federal funds will provide us with $16,000 to $19,000, which will allow us to hire a mental health professional part time to deal with the homeless who are suffering from mental illness," Held said.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
The Carroll County Health Department will stop providing mental health services by June 30, a move that will eliminate the jobs of 40 employees who provide treatment to about 1,000 clients.Beginning Feb. 10, the department will no longer accept new mental health admissions, and over the next few months county health officials plan to refer current patients to private providers in the county."We hope to have most of our patients transitioned out to other programs and therapists by April," said acting county health officer Larry L. Leitch.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1997
By June 30, the Carroll County Health Department will eliminate its mental health bureau and the services it provides for more than 500 mentally ill, mostly low-income county residents.Beyond that, little is certain.Plans call for patients to be referred to private treatment providers over the next few months and for all 40 mental health bureau employees to be laid off. But the pending shutdown has created more questions than answers.Unsure about specifics, staff members are struggling to explain the changes to anxious patients.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | February 9, 1997
By June 30, the Carroll County Health Department will eliminate its mental health bureau and the services it provides for more than 500 mentally ill, mostly low-income county residents.Beyond that, little is certain.Plans call for patients to be referred to private treatment providers over the next few months and for all 40 mental health bureau employees to be laid off. But the pending shutdown has created more questions than answers.Unsure about specifics, staff members are struggling to explain the changes to anxious patients.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
The Carroll County Health Department will stop providing mental health services by June 30, a move that will eliminate the jobs of 40 employees who provide treatment to about 1,000 clients.Beginning Feb. 10, the department will no longer accept new mental health admissions, and over the next few months county health officials plan to refer current patients to private providers in the county."We hope to have most of our patients transitioned out to other programs and therapists by April," said acting county health officer Larry L. Leitch.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1997
The Carroll County Health Department will stop providing mental health services by June 30, a move that will eliminate the jobs of 40 employees who provide treatment to about 1,000 clients.Beginning Feb. 10, the department will no longer accept new mental health admissions, and over the next few months county health officials plan to refer current patients to private providers in the county."We hope to have most of our patients transitioned out to other programs and therapists by April," said acting county health officer Larry L. Leitch.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
Carroll County's mental health advisory committee voted yesterday to ask the county commissioners to create a new agency with the financial clout to change how county residents receive mental health services.The agency, which would be called a core service agency, is proposed as a private, nonprofit group that would distribute approximately $2.2 million a year that Carroll agencies receive from the state Mental Hygiene Administration to provide community mental health services."The core service agency would have a lot of flexibility and power to distribute or redistribute mental health dollars," said Howard Held, director of the county Health Department's Mental Health Bureau.
NEWS
December 8, 1992
Mental Health Bureau helps to stop suicideThe Mental Health Bureau of the Health Department administers a county government-funded Suicide Prevention Program for those under 21 deemed to be at-risk.The program is available by calling the Health Department at 876-4750 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays, and asking for Dean C. Wolf, coordinator of the Child and Adolescent Unit.After normal working hours, and on holidays and weekends, those needing help may call the Emergency Operations Center at 911. Maryland youths can reach a crisis counselor 24 hours a day by calling the statewide hot line, (800)
NEWS
By Donna K. H. Walters and Donna K. H. Walters,Los Angeles Times | October 25, 1992
In a startling decision that has sparked the ire of alcoho industry critics, the federal government is allowing a California vintner to tell consumers about potential health benefits of drinking wine.Beringer Vineyards in Napa Valley said it would soon begin production of 100,000 tags to be placed on the necks of its wine bottles, with a six-paragraph excerpt from a "60 Minutes" program that includes the claim that moderate drinking of red wine "reduces the risk of heart disease."The approval for the tags came last week from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, the agency in the Treasury Department that regulates alcohol producers, and seems to end a contentious yearlong squabble between the bureau and winemakers over use of the "60 Minutes" material.
NEWS
January 23, 1991
A slow economy always means an increase in the number of people using public health services because they can't afford private medical care, said Jo Riley-Kauer, chief of the Addictions Bureau of the Carroll County Health Department.At the meeting yesterday of the Alcoholism, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Advisory Board, chairman Bert Benzasked the public and private health providers there what effect the declining economy and the war in the Persian Gulf were having on their agencies.Even before the war, the recession brought more people, and therefore longer waiting lists, to the Addictions Bureau, Riley-Kauer said.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | October 17, 1990
WESTMINSTER -- People who seek help and information about mental illness and addictions usually don't do so until there's a crisis, said Janice Becker of Berrett, a member of the Alliance for the Mentally Ill.That could be one reason so few people turned out for a forum conducted Monday by the Mental Health and Addictions bureaus of the state Department of Health.Howard Held, director of the Mental Health Bureau, and Jo Riley-Kauer, director of the Addictions Bureau, organized the event to let people know what their departments offer, and to give the public a chance to ask questions or complain, they said.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | September 22, 1991
A federal grant will enable the county Mental Health Bureau to expand services this fall to help homeless people who are mentally ill.Through Projects for Assistance in the Transition from Homelessness,or PATH, additional efforts will be made on behalf of the homeless mentally ill, said Howard Held, director of the Mental Health Bureau.The bureau will use the money to help the homeless in county shelters who are having difficulty coping."These federal funds will provide us with $16,000 to $19,000, which will allow us to hire a mental health professional part time to deal with the homeless who are suffering from mental illness," Held said.
NEWS
July 31, 1991
The Carroll County Government funds a suicide prevention program administered and monitored by the Mental Health Bureau of the Carroll County Health Department.The target population of this program is younger than 21 who are in a life-threatening situation.Call the Carroll County Health Department at 876-4750 between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. weekdays and asking for Dean C. Wolf, coordinator of the Child and Adolescent Unit.The Emergency Operations Center can be reached at 911 after normal working hours, holidays and weekends.
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