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HEALTH
By Amy Reed, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is printed here. This week, Amy Reed weighs in on coconut drinks. Coconut products, such as coconut water and coconut cream, are among the hot new items hitting grocery store shelves. Are these drinks beneficial for your health? Coconut water is the liquid inside a young coconut. One cup of coconut water contains about 50 calories and no protein or fat. Coconut water is low in calories, although the amount varies depending on added ingredients such as sugar or juice.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 2014
As one of those impacted by Baltimore County's unwillingness to pay a judgment against it for the overcharging some police department retirees for their health benefits, I believe that County Executive Kevin Kamenetz has the responsibility to comply with the court's order ( "Judge orders Kamenetz to appear in court in police union dispute," April 22). The delays will result in the county incurring additional cost, and it will come from the county's general fund and not from Mr. Kamenetz's pocket.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
After years of being relegated through the purgatory of forgotten foods, kale has found itself in the spotlight for the first time in decades and is ready to prove it belongs there permanently. A crop of the ancients, kale has been cultivated for over 2,000 years and was the precursor to modern-day cabbage, brussel sprouts, cauliflower and broccoli. Easy to plant, harvest and propagate, kale was a favorite of both the Romans and the Greeks. The leafy green fell out of favor in many cultures in the last century, as more exotic cruciferous vegetables became popular.
NEWS
April 23, 2014
Baltimore County Circuit Judge Michael J. Finifter knows how to get County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's attention. A year and a half after Maryland's highest court upheld an arbitrator's decision that Baltimore County had overcharged a group of police department retirees for their health insurance benefits and owed them recompense, the county still has not paid and is working its hardest to avoid ever doing so. Now Mr. Finifter has threatened to hold...
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
A settlement agreement ending health benefits for Sparrows Point workers Aug. 31 was approved Thursday in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Wilmington, Del. The agreement, struck by mill owner RG Steel and the United Steelworkers union last week, also retroactively ended supplemental unemployment pay as of Aug. 10. Judge Kevin J. Carey, who is overseeing RG Steel's bankruptcy case, wrote in Thursday's court order that the deal appeared to be "in the best...
NEWS
By William Wan and Michelle Boorstein and The Washington Post | March 5, 2010
The former chief operating officer of Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington has called on the organization to reverse its recent decision to change health benefits for employees' spouses, a move designed to avoid legitimizing same-sex marriage. Tim Sawina, who was until last year one of the group's highest-ranking executives, called the elimination of spousal health benefits "devastating" and "wrong" in a letter Wednesday to the governing board of the social service organization.
NEWS
By Theresa Barry and Theresa Barry,Bloomberg News Service | December 1, 2006
Red wine surrendered a clue to its health benefits in a study suggesting Madiran, a traditional French wine, may be brimming with one of the more valuable ingredients for protecting the heart. Scientists found the most potent form of polyphenols, which help reduce the risk of artery damage, in Madiran, and lesser amounts in other wines from southwestern France and Italy's Sardinian province of Nuoro. People in those regions also tend to live longer than those in surrounding areas, according to the study, in yesterday's issue of the journal Nature.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,New York Bureau | November 22, 1992
In a sad reunion, former executives of Maryland Cup hav been trooping through Baltimore, the old company town, to give depositions on a lawsuit underscoring the tumultuous changes that followed the company's sale to Fort Howard Co.The suit was brought by Robert Gable, a retiree whose fingers were cut severely in a 1989 household accident. With his severed fingertips wrapped in a towel, Mr. Gable was rushed to Carroll County General Hospital. There, fast-working surgeons reattached the pieces.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | March 8, 1991
Even as state-mandated health benefits come under their severest attack in years, scores of people urged legislators to add four more such benefits.The appeals were made yesterday before the Economics Affairs Committee in the House of Delegates. If the proposals are enacted, health insurers would be required to provide coverage for the preventive care of children, care for new born and newly adopted children, treatment for certain types of mental illnesses, and mammography to detect breast cancer.
NEWS
By New York Times | September 26, 1991
Three in 10 Americans say they or someone in their household have at some time stayed in a job mainly to keep the health benefits, according to a New York Times/CBS News Poll that provides some of the strongest evidence yet of pervasive concern about the costs of medical insurance and care.This phenomenon, becoming known around the country as "job lock," was most prevalent in middle-income households, suggesting the rising potency of health care as a political issue.Half the people say the nation's health care system needs fundamental changes and another 40 percent go even further, saying it must be completely rebuilt, the survey found.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Jenny Morgan headed a health care IT company for years before jumping to private equity, but she realized her passion wasn't investing in firms — it was being in the trenches, running one. So when the founder of Linthicum-based basys wanted to bring in a new CEO, she happily took the job in 2009. The timing — during the rough recession — wasn't ideal. But she says the benefits-administration software company made good use of the downtime and positioned itself for growth. Basys, which employs nearly 100 people, focuses on a very specific niche: helping "Taft-Hartley" funds, entities that manage union members' benefits, with their administration.
NEWS
By Jack Meyer | February 3, 2014
The bungled roll-out of the website used by Americans who want to enroll in the new Health Insurance Marketplaces under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has obscured the fundamental reasons why the U.S. must make health reform work: a vital component of a modern economy is comprehensive, affordable, and portable health coverage. These marketplaces, coupled with ACA insurance market reforms, can meet this need through subsidies, benefit guarantees and the assurance that workers can take their coverage with them when they changes jobs or lose a job. Those who would blow-up the ACA without a viable alternative would leave the U.S. with a job-based health insurance system that is rapidly deteriorating.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 8, 2014
Playing a sport in high school may have health benefits well beyond graduation, a new study found. Those who played varsity sports were found to remain active decades later, and that resulted in better health and improved mental well being as a senior, according to the study, Fit in 50 Years, published in BMC Public Health.  The study followed 712 World War II veterans who passed a rigorous physican exam by the military. Their health was surveyed 50 years later. “The most surprising result was those who played a high school sport reported visiting their doctor fewer times a year,” said Simone Dohle of ETH Zurich, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology , in a statement.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Anne Arundel County is poised to drastically change the health benefits it offers county workers when they retire, a move designed to keep the government on sound financial footing. After months of debate, the County Council plans to vote Monday on a new package of retiree health benefits, even as employee unions already are considering challenging the bill in court. County Executive Laura Neuman said curtailing retiree health benefits is a necessary step to keep the county government financially healthy.
NEWS
By Kathleen Sebelius | January 1, 2014
As we wish our friends and family a happy, healthy New Year, these words have renewed meaning in 2014. January 1st is a new day in health care for millions of families and individuals in the Baltimore area and throughout Maryland. It's now against the law for insurance companies to deny you coverage or charge you more because of a pre-existing medical condition like diabetes, high-blood pressure or asthma. And they can no longer drop you from coverage just because you get sick or get into an accident.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
Workers for Giant Food and Safeway stores in the Baltimore-Washington region voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to ratify a three-year labor contract that preserves health benefits and raises wages over three years. Leaders with the United Food and Commercial Workers characterized the contract as one of the best in the grocery business at a time when companies are scaling back benefits and offering one-time bonuses instead of wage increases. Giant and Safeway, the Baltimore area's biggest supermarket chains, said the agreement will enable them to stay competitive in the changing retail landscape.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2005
The Columbia Association has followed the lead of the Howard County school system and government by offering full health benefits to domestic partners of the same sex. The association implemented the policy after the Howard chapter of Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays inquired this year about the possibility of the association offering the benefits. "We felt that would be a positive step in the right direction, in making those benefits available," association President Maggie J. Brown said.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | April 26, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration is considering a tax on workers' health benefits to finance medical coverage for more than 30 million uninsured Americans, Health and Human Services Secretary Louis Sullivan says.The approach, which Sullivan refers to as a "tax cap," would make employer-paid health benefits above a certain dollar amount subject to tax as personal income."We are looking at a number of strategies, such as a 'tax cap' on employer-provided health care to provide funds for those who don't have [insurance]
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler joined union workers picketing a Bowie Safeway Tuesday to pressure the grocery giant to concede on the health benefits that are tying up contract negotiations. "This all about awareness," Gansler, who is running for governor, said during a break in convincing shoppers to sign a petition.  Gansler accused Safeway and Giant, which negotiate with the same union, of trying to use provisions of the new federal health law "to take away" health coverage.  "Companies are using the Affordable Care Act to undermine health care," Gansler said.  The United Food and Commerical Workers Local 400, which represents unionized grocery workers Maryland's D.C. suburbs, Washington and northern Virginia, has objected to how Safeway and Giant have dealt with escalating health care costs and the impact of the Affordable Care Act on employers.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
A court has ordered Baltimore County to reduce the health insurance premiums it charges hundreds of retired police officers. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Michael J. Finifter gave the county 10 days to comply with the order. The ruling is the latest in the legal dispute between the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 and the county government over what proportion of the retirees' health insurance premiums the county pays. A county spokeswoman said Thursday the county's attorneys are reviewing the order, but declined to comment further.
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