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NEWS
November 10, 1993
Given all the concerns of Carroll residents whose homes and lives have been threatened by the Keystone Landfill, it is distressing that but three of them showed up a week ago to meet with Maryland environmental officials.Officials were prepared to collect data on the disease and death around the Pennsylvania landfill. Contamination of ground water affects residents living over the Mason-Dixon Line in northern Carroll as well. But the officials were unable to collect much meaningful data due to the poor attendance.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Maryland officials approved $16 billion in contracts Wednesday that are intended to change the way state employees use health care by offering rewards for taking steps to stay well - and imposing penalties for refusing to comply. Rewards would come in the form of free doctor visits and procedures, while penalties for failing to follow medical advice could go as high as $375. Most coverage changes start in January. The contract award, believed to be the largest in Maryland history, is projected to save the state and its employees $4 billion over the next decade.
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BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | February 9, 2007
It began as not quite a mom-and-apple-pie idea. More of a mom-and-baby-powder idea. An employer approached CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield asking if the insurer could offer "a basket of goodies - baby oil, all that stuff" as an incentive for pregnant employees to get prenatal care, according to William Casey, CareFirst's vice president for government affairs. CareFirst's medical staff loved the idea. Insurers such as CareFirst are putting more emphasis on preventive care and "wellness promotion" programs such as smoking cessation or exercise classes.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
You can see why a state might require minors to have a parent's OK before they receive medical care. But Maryland law has made life especially difficult for homeless teenagers who have no adults watching out for them. It's the sort of problem that drives Lisa Stambolis crazy. As director of pediatric and adolescent health at Health Care for the Homeless in Baltimore, she organized people — including homeless teens — to press for change. It worked. A new law offering more leeway for minors' medical treatment goes into effect Oct. 1. In July, Stambolis was honored for her efforts and named a White House "Champion of Change," one of 13 selected for their efforts on behalf of homeless youth.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Maryland officials approved $16 billion in contracts Wednesday that are intended to change the way state employees use health care by offering rewards for taking steps to stay well - and imposing penalties for refusing to comply. Rewards would come in the form of free doctor visits and procedures, while penalties for failing to follow medical advice could go as high as $375. Most coverage changes start in January. The contract award, believed to be the largest in Maryland history, is projected to save the state and its employees $4 billion over the next decade.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | May 27, 2009
At Domino Sugar, workers have competed to lose weight. At Laureate Education, employees get a small subsidy toward a gym membership. At apparel designer 180s, workers are encouraged to work out at lunch. Even in a recession, employers say they are putting money into corporate wellness programs they hope will lead to healthier workers and healthier profits. For many businesses, doing so will be a matter of survival as the cost of health care soars along with chronic health problems, corporate wellness experts say. Experts contend that improving workers' health can also reduce costs associated with absenteeism and workers' compensation.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
You can see why a state might require minors to have a parent's OK before they receive medical care. But Maryland law has made life especially difficult for homeless teenagers who have no adults watching out for them. It's the sort of problem that drives Lisa Stambolis crazy. As director of pediatric and adolescent health at Health Care for the Homeless in Baltimore, she organized people — including homeless teens — to press for change. It worked. A new law offering more leeway for minors' medical treatment goes into effect Oct. 1. In July, Stambolis was honored for her efforts and named a White House "Champion of Change," one of 13 selected for their efforts on behalf of homeless youth.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1997
HOW IS the bay doing?Several years ago a magazine writer asked me that, and for hours I addressed the state of the whole 64,000-square-mile watershed in numbing complexity, hedging every upside with a downside, and vice versa.Still, I have often thought since then that I gave him only a poor, partial answer.I should have also taken him canoeing for an hour on the nearby river where I grew up and talked about all the life I gloried in there as a child, and how diminished it was for my own children.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Members of the Harford County legislative delegation have asked the state to look into the possible health hazards to area residents of a proposed change in mining operations at the Arundel Sand & Gravel Co.'s big quarry off Interstate 95 near Havre de Grace. In a letter mailed Monday, nine of the county's lawmakers asked the Maryland Department of the Environment to respond to residents' concerns about potential air-quality degradation and elevated incidence of lung cancer in the Havre de Grace area before awarding the company a requested modification to its mining permit.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | June 1, 1994
A citizens' group got a preview last night of an engineering plan to assess contamination around the Keystone landfill.But members of the Keystone Landfill Task Force -- representatives of citizens' groups and local governments in Carroll County and Adams County, Pa. -- reacted angrily at being denied a chance to lobby a federal agency for a neighborhood health effects study.Keystone, a privately owned landfill about 600 yards across the Maryland-Pennsylvania border in Union Township, Pa., was placed on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Superfund cleanup list in 1987.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,lorraine.mirabella@baltsun.com | May 27, 2009
At Domino Sugar, workers have competed to lose weight. At Laureate Education, employees get a small subsidy toward a gym membership. At apparel designer 180s, workers are encouraged to work out at lunch. Even in a recession, employers say they are putting money into corporate wellness programs they hope will lead to healthier workers and healthier profits. For many businesses, doing so will be a matter of survival as the cost of health care soars along with chronic health problems, corporate wellness experts say. Experts contend that improving workers' health can also reduce costs associated with absenteeism and workers' compensation.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,Sun reporter | February 9, 2007
It began as not quite a mom-and-apple-pie idea. More of a mom-and-baby-powder idea. An employer approached CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield asking if the insurer could offer "a basket of goodies - baby oil, all that stuff" as an incentive for pregnant employees to get prenatal care, according to William Casey, CareFirst's vice president for government affairs. CareFirst's medical staff loved the idea. Insurers such as CareFirst are putting more emphasis on preventive care and "wellness promotion" programs such as smoking cessation or exercise classes.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2004
Members of the Harford County legislative delegation have asked the state to look into the possible health hazards to area residents of a proposed change in mining operations at the Arundel Sand & Gravel Co.'s big quarry off Interstate 95 near Havre de Grace. In a letter mailed Monday, nine of the county's lawmakers asked the Maryland Department of the Environment to respond to residents' concerns about potential air-quality degradation and elevated incidence of lung cancer in the Havre de Grace area before awarding the company a requested modification to its mining permit.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1997
HOW IS the bay doing?Several years ago a magazine writer asked me that, and for hours I addressed the state of the whole 64,000-square-mile watershed in numbing complexity, hedging every upside with a downside, and vice versa.Still, I have often thought since then that I gave him only a poor, partial answer.I should have also taken him canoeing for an hour on the nearby river where I grew up and talked about all the life I gloried in there as a child, and how diminished it was for my own children.
NEWS
November 10, 1993
Given all the concerns of Carroll residents whose homes and lives have been threatened by the Keystone Landfill, it is distressing that but three of them showed up a week ago to meet with Maryland environmental officials.Officials were prepared to collect data on the disease and death around the Pennsylvania landfill. Contamination of ground water affects residents living over the Mason-Dixon Line in northern Carroll as well. But the officials were unable to collect much meaningful data due to the poor attendance.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | January 22, 2009
Gov. Martin O'Malley will push to allow the Department of Juvenile Services to share information about children in its care with other social agencies - something now prohibited by state law. The governor's bill, which he plans to announce today, would lift the parental consent requirement that hampers even simple communication. For example, when a youth is arrested, Juvenile Services workers cannot make a phone call to social services workers to see whether the child is in foster care.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | February 21, 2013
Saint Agnes Hospital will work with local churches to screen for heart disease, using a $244,455 grant from The AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation. The hospital announced Thursday that it had received the award. The screening program will focus on African-American women, who have the highest risk for developing heart disease, the hospital said. Those found to have heart disease or risk for it will get access to educational programs, lifestyle coaches and exercise classes. The hospital will follow patients over time and measure improvements in health.
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