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NEWS
June 17, 2014
In its permit ruling last month, the Maryland Public Service Commission stated that the proposed Cove Point liquefied natural gas refinery is not in the public interest and would be a net economic negative for the state. That should have been the end of the discussion and the project should have been denied ( "Cove Point natural gas export facility gets state OK," May 30). Instead, the PSC thinks that if Dominion shells out $48 million for absolution for the harm they will cause to the environment and economy, it will be acceptable.
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NEWS
June 17, 2014
In its permit ruling last month, the Maryland Public Service Commission stated that the proposed Cove Point liquefied natural gas refinery is not in the public interest and would be a net economic negative for the state. That should have been the end of the discussion and the project should have been denied ( "Cove Point natural gas export facility gets state OK," May 30). Instead, the PSC thinks that if Dominion shells out $48 million for absolution for the harm they will cause to the environment and economy, it will be acceptable.
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NEWS
October 2, 2005
The Knights of Columbus Council 76 of Eldersburg will offer its second annual Family Safety and Learning Expo from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday on the parking lot of the Eldersburg Wal-Mart on Liberty Road at Route 32. The event brings together civic, business and community organizations, government agencies, law enforcement and emergency services agencies with information on safety and health for all ages. Last year's event attracted 1,200 youths and their families. This year, organizers expect to double attendance.
NEWS
January 13, 2014
Is anyone surprised that one of the top items on the agenda for the General Assembly this session is a proposed legalization of recreational marijuana? ( "Mike Miller, marijuana and the right side of history Jan. 9). Note that close to the top of the list of reasons for doing so are always tax revenues. And, of course, these anticipated new taxes will go toward mom and apple pie causes like education, such as Del. Heather Mizeur's call for universal pre-K. Isn't that a familiar tune?
NEWS
By Cox News Service | January 10, 1992
WASHINGTON -- America is becoming a safer place to live, according to an alliance of consumer groups.An annual comprehensive report on health and safety showed deaths are down from car wrecks and home accidents, people are smoking fewer cigarettes and drinking less alcohol, more folks are buckling their seat belts, and more Americansare trying to eat healthier foods."
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 8, 2000
Pasadena elected officials have asked the governor to intervene and remove a site in the Patapsco River off Pasadena from a list of proposed locations to hold 40 million to 80 million cubic yards of dredge spoil. Pasadena's District 31 legislative delegation - state Sen. Philip C. Jimeno and Dels. Joan Cadden, Mary M. Rosso and John R. Leopold, the lone Republican - wrote Gov. Parris N. Glendening that the site, north of Bodkin Point in the mouth of the river, is "fraught with environmental, health and safety concerns that make it unacceptable by any standards."
NEWS
By Wendy Wagner and Rena Steinzor | March 30, 2009
President Barack Obama's order this month striking down Bush-era barriers to embryonic stem cell research overshadowed his perhaps larger announcement on science that day: He directed his science adviser to develop a comprehensive plan to protect science from politics in his administration. That's a worthy enterprise, and it will be a challenge given the vast scope of the problem. During the Bush years, it was all too common for administration political appointees to suppress or reshape scientific findings.
NEWS
By MARK WILSON | September 3, 1995
America's labor law needs reform. After Labor Day, Congress will begin debating proposals to improve the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and merge it with the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).The goal of these reforms is to redefine the role of the federal government in workplace health and safety from that of heavy-handed regulator to one of cooperative partner. Over the past 25 years, the federal government has been increasingly perceived as more concerned with maintaining bureaucracies and filling out paperwork than with working cooperatively with business to make workplaces safer.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 15, 1999
WASHINGTON -- After finding that workers who complain of health and safety hazards are often dismissed from their jobs, the Clinton administration will soon propose sweeping new protections for such whistle-blowers, federal officials say.The law that created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration prohibits employers from retaliating against people who report unsafe or unhealtful working conditions.But the inspector general of the Labor Department, Charles Masten, said such reprisals often occur, and Charles Jeffress, the assistant secretary of labor in charge of OSHA, said the Clinton administration would soon recommend changes in the law to increase the protection of workers who expose health and safety hazards.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
As of tomorrow, any Carroll County volunteer firefighter who hasn't undergone a physical examination will not be allowed to participate on emergency calls. Officials in the county's Volunteer Emergency Services Association hoped the Jan. 1 deadline would spur more regular screenings among the 14 volunteer fire companies that serve the county. Since physical examinations became a part of the association's health and safety program in 1995, fire officials said it has been a struggle to get volunteers into medical centers for routine examinations.
NEWS
December 6, 2013
The recent commentary concerning Harbor Point and the hexavalent chromium clearly describes the potential harm to the surrounding residents, but there is another issue that should be of a greater concern ("Harbor Point environmental questions," Dec. 2). The single monitoring well in Back Bay at the Living Classroom Foundation campus, just north of the Harbor Point site, has at least 40,000 times the concentration of hexavalent chromium that is penetrating the surrounding soil.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 8, 2013
The popular Burger King restaurant on Fort Meade, shut down this week when workers discovered an infestation of maggots, has reopened after an all-clear from the installation's public health team. Col. Edward C. Rothstein, commander of the Army base in Anne Arundel County, closed the restaurant Wednesday after the insect larvae were discovered during repairs to a soda machine. The infestation apparently developed around a leak behind a panel that was inaccessible to restaurant workers, according to base officials.
NEWS
By Rena Steinzor and Amy Sinden | December 26, 2012
Incumbent presidents don't run for reelection simply to preserve first-term accomplishments. Presidents and presidential candidates are men and women of big ambition, driven by the immense self-confidence required to run for the job and a desire to accomplish important things. Barack Obama's ambitions are clear. He came to office in 2009 on the strength of a far-reaching, progressive agenda that included resurrecting the economy, rebuilding the American middle class, ending one war, winning another, stopping the Bush-era tax giveaways to the rich, fixing the health care system, addressing global warming, ending "Don't ask, don't tell," and more.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | September 17, 2012
The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene is asking the public for informal comments on proposed changes to regulations for summer youth camps. The regulations that look at health and safety issue haven't been updated since 1992. More than 700 youth camps are certified and inspected annually by state health officials and just as many that are run by government agencies or accredited alternatively through Boy Scouts of America or other groups. Officials are looking at these questions: 1.      Should there be a change in the frequency of inspections for camps, based on their health and safety experience, inspection history, and risk?
NEWS
July 12, 2010
We would like to thank the Baltimore Sun for covering the issue of the proposed cuts to school based health centers ("Student resources once on the chopping block to be fully funded, school officials say," July 7, 2010). When the Baltimore Education Coalition learned that potentially seven school based health centers were proposed to close, we took action and contacted the mayor and our city council representatives. We shared our concern about the impact to the health and safety of the thousands of children that would have lost access to their current primary health providers.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | November 24, 2009
College of Notre Dame of Maryland has canceled its 2009-10 season after serious injuries to several members of the team left the roster depleted to the point where continuing to play would put the health and safety of the players at risk, athletic director Michael Spinner said Monday in a statement. Rob Long resigned after three seasons as coach and was replaced on an interim basis by soccer coach and recruiting coordinator Kirsten Russell , a former college basketball player and assistant coach who will oversee the program's administration and recruiting to rebuild the team for 2010-11.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 21, 2009
Roger Dean Posey, a retired railroader who was director of occupational health and safety for the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, died March 11 of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Eldersburg resident was 56. Mr. Posey, whose father was vice president of engineering for the Chessie System, was born in Ashland, Ky., and moved to Arbutus with his family in 1966. He was a 1971 graduate of Lansdowne High School and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1979.
NEWS
April 3, 2005
A free health fair focusing on children's health and safety will be held tomorrow at the Harriet Lane Clinic of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Topics to be covered include safety seats, menu planning, dental care and parenting skills. Experts will be available to offer advice, and there will be literature and giveaways. The fair, from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., is open to the public. Those interested in attending should enter the hospital's main entrance at 600 N. Wolfe St. and follow signs for the Harriet Lane Clinic.
NEWS
By Wendy Wagner and Rena Steinzor | March 30, 2009
President Barack Obama's order this month striking down Bush-era barriers to embryonic stem cell research overshadowed his perhaps larger announcement on science that day: He directed his science adviser to develop a comprehensive plan to protect science from politics in his administration. That's a worthy enterprise, and it will be a challenge given the vast scope of the problem. During the Bush years, it was all too common for administration political appointees to suppress or reshape scientific findings.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 21, 2009
Roger Dean Posey, a retired railroader who was director of occupational health and safety for the Pentagon Force Protection Agency, died March 11 of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Eldersburg resident was 56. Mr. Posey, whose father was vice president of engineering for the Chessie System, was born in Ashland, Ky., and moved to Arbutus with his family in 1966. He was a 1971 graduate of Lansdowne High School and earned a bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1979.
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