Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHealth Advocates
IN THE NEWS

Health Advocates

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
After successfully pushing a new dime-a-drink alcohol tax, health care advocates are advocating for a new $1 levy on tobacco. That would bring the total to $3 for a pack of cigarettes, among the highest in the nation. A coalition led by the Maryland Citizens Health Initiative says the tax increase would further deter smoking. "To demonstrate how effective tobacco taxes are, smoking rates have declined by 32.6 percent between 1998 and 2009, saving 70,000 people from preventable tobacco-related death," Vincent DeMarco, the group's president, said during a news conference Tuesday announcing the campaign.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Rebecca Ruggles | September 17, 2014
The shelving of a plan to build a new CSX rail facility in the West Baltimore residential neighborhood of Morrell Park was decried recently as a setback for regional job growth and a sign of failed leadership by CSX. But articles in The Baltimore Sun and the Baltimore Business Journal omitted mention of the successful leadership of health advocates and community members who insisted that specific health consequences of the planned facility be addressed....
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Sitting around a broad table in a nondescript office in Reisterstown last week, more than a dozen mental health advocates, medical professionals and law enforcement officials stared tensely at one another. Nearly a month after the state-created task force issued a report outlining its findings on psychiatric patients' access to firearms, several members were questioning a key recommendation - that mental health professionals should be required to report to law enforcement all patients who threaten suicide.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Maryland consumers will get an additional eight days to buy health insurance on the state's online exchange after officials announced Friday they would extend enrollment. The state joined the federal government in giving people more time to make a decision on a health plan as marylandhealthconnection.gov continues to face technical difficulties that include slowness and error messages. The state exchange is where uninsured Marylanders - estimated to number 800,000 - can buy health plans under the Affordable Care Act. The new deadline for enrollment to receive coverage starting in the new year is Dec. 23. Consumers must buy a plan by March to avoid a penalty.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | March 13, 1991
A reorganization of patients at the Springfield Hospital Center was designed to alleviate overcrowding, but has come under criticism by area mental health advocates.The change eliminates geographic separation of patients in the two main buildings to which they first are admitted, said Dr. Bruce Hershfield, hospital superintendent.Until this month, patients from northwest Baltimore City all wereadmitted to one building and patients from Carroll, Frederick, Howard and Montgomery counties were admitted to the other.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | April 2, 2008
Health advocates are decrying what they say is an industry-sponsored weakening of legislation that would ban jewelry, toys or other children's products in Maryland containing toxic lead. The House of Delegates approved the ban weeks ago, by a vote of 132-4. But the legislation, which was originally proposed as emergency legislation, has since been amended by the Senate Finance Committee, delaying any action for more than a year, to July 1 next year.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 18, 2013
A new federal report finds toxic contamination remains widespread in the Chesapeake Bay, with severe impacts in some places, which health and environmental advocates say lends support to their push in Annapolis for legislative action on pesticides and other hazardous chemicals. The 184-page report, recently posted on the website of the Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay program , notes that nearly three-fourths of the bay's tidal waters are "fully or partially impaired" by toxic chemicals, with contamination severe enough in some areas that people are warned to limit how many fish they eat from there.  The chemicals tainting fish are mainly mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs.  Once widely used in electrical equipment, PCBs were banned years ago over health concerns, but residues linger and continue to show up in fish tissue.  "They may be coming down - I can't say they're not - but we know they're not coming down quickly," said Greg Allen, an EPA scientist and the lead author of the interagency report, which was produced in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Fish and Wildlife Service . Contamination is severe in a handful of "hot spots" around the bay, including Baltimore's harbor, largely a legacy of past industrial and shipping activity.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2003
Health advocates alleged yesterday that Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s proposed budget could violate state law by cutting in half state spending on anti-smoking programs. Ehrlich's budget, unveiled Friday, cuts spending on smoking prevention and cessation from $30 million to $15.2 million -- less than the $21 million minimum spending required by a 1999 law raising the state's cigarette tax. Kari Appler, project director of Smoke Free Maryland, a coalition of public health groups, said the new administration's reductions were not only illegal but shortsighted.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | January 22, 2007
Public health advocates fear that a new federal regulation requiring Medicaid applicants to supply proof of identity and citizenship has resulted in thousands of poor Marylanders losing their health insurance. The requirement, part of the federal Deficit Reduction Act that went into effect in Maryland in September, was designed to prevent illegal immigrants from fraudulently receiving Medicaid, the nation's premier health insurance program for the poor. But advocates and health officers in some Maryland counties insist the rule has burdened citizens who need health care the most and is likely responsible for thousands of Marylanders being kicked off the Medicaid rolls.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 24, 2012
A tax increase on small cigars and other tobacco products popular with teenagers has resulted in a bump in the prices of these products just as health advocates had hoped. The Maryland Health Care for All! Coalition will release a study today showing that prices have increased since the tax went into affect July 1. For instance, a single Swisher Sweets flavored cigar cost $1.29 before the tax and now costs $1.69.  A 5-pack of Swisher Sweets cost $5.49 before the tax and now costs $7.99.
HEALTH
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2013
Maryland Comptroller Peter Franchot and the Maryland Health Care For All Coalition are encouraging small businesses in Anne Arundel County to use federal tax credits available through the Affordable Care Act to cover some of the costs of providing employee health insurance. Franchot will kick off a campaign Thursday to reach more than 5,000 of the county's businesses through mailings. The health reform law requires businesses with 50 or more employees to offer health insurance by Jan. 1, 2015, but businesses with fewer than 50 workers are not required to offer insurance.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2013
Sitting around a broad table in a nondescript office in Reisterstown last week, more than a dozen mental health advocates, medical professionals and law enforcement officials stared tensely at one another. Nearly a month after the state-created task force issued a report outlining its findings on psychiatric patients' access to firearms, several members were questioning a key recommendation - that mental health professionals should be required to report to law enforcement all patients who threaten suicide.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | January 18, 2013
A new federal report finds toxic contamination remains widespread in the Chesapeake Bay, with severe impacts in some places, which health and environmental advocates say lends support to their push in Annapolis for legislative action on pesticides and other hazardous chemicals. The 184-page report, recently posted on the website of the Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay program , notes that nearly three-fourths of the bay's tidal waters are "fully or partially impaired" by toxic chemicals, with contamination severe enough in some areas that people are warned to limit how many fish they eat from there.  The chemicals tainting fish are mainly mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs.  Once widely used in electrical equipment, PCBs were banned years ago over health concerns, but residues linger and continue to show up in fish tissue.  "They may be coming down - I can't say they're not - but we know they're not coming down quickly," said Greg Allen, an EPA scientist and the lead author of the interagency report, which was produced in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey and the Fish and Wildlife Service . Contamination is severe in a handful of "hot spots" around the bay, including Baltimore's harbor, largely a legacy of past industrial and shipping activity.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 24, 2012
A tax increase on small cigars and other tobacco products popular with teenagers has resulted in a bump in the prices of these products just as health advocates had hoped. The Maryland Health Care for All! Coalition will release a study today showing that prices have increased since the tax went into affect July 1. For instance, a single Swisher Sweets flavored cigar cost $1.29 before the tax and now costs $1.69.  A 5-pack of Swisher Sweets cost $5.49 before the tax and now costs $7.99.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2011
After successfully pushing a new dime-a-drink alcohol tax, health care advocates are advocating for a new $1 levy on tobacco. That would bring the total to $3 for a pack of cigarettes, among the highest in the nation. A coalition led by the Maryland Citizens Health Initiative says the tax increase would further deter smoking. "To demonstrate how effective tobacco taxes are, smoking rates have declined by 32.6 percent between 1998 and 2009, saving 70,000 people from preventable tobacco-related death," Vincent DeMarco, the group's president, said during a news conference Tuesday announcing the campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
The Center for the Science in the Public Interest, which has done more good for the health of Americans than its legion of detractors has released its annual Xtreme Eating Awards, the most egregious items on chain menus. Here's what they say about the Cold Stone Creamery PB&C Shake : Even people accustomed to 1,500-calorie burgers wouldn't expect 2,000-calorie shakes. A 24-oz. “Gotta Have It” size shake of peanut butter, chocolate ice cream and milk has a day's calories (2,010)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | January 13, 2010
Public health advocates are rallying behind a 10 cents-per-drink increase in Maryland's alcohol tax to protect programs that could fall victim to the next round of state cuts needed to avoid a projected $2 billion budget shortfall. Del. William A. Bronrott and Sen. Richard S. Madaleno Sr., both Montgomery County Democrats, said Monday that they plan to introduce legislation that would raise $200 million through higher liquor taxes. The money would pay for programs to prevent and treat substance abuse and fill other funding gaps in health-related services.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2010
With the gubernatorial election over, the campaign rhetoric has quieted, but the problem of Maryland's billion-plus budget shortfall remains — and with it, the discussion of higher taxes. Former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and Republican leaders in the General Assembly warned that the re-election of Gov. Martin O'Malley and the Democrats would mean tax increases. Indeed, O'Malley refused to join Ehrlich in a campaign pledge against raising taxes. After defeating Ehrlich last week, O'Malley said the budget he proposes in January will not contain tax increases.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.