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NEWS
January 28, 2003
Today's highlights 10 a.m.Senate meets, Senate chamber. 10 a.m.House of Delegates meets, House chamber. 11 a.m.House Judiciary Committee, briefing on juvenile justice issues by Secretary Kenneth C. Montague Jr., Room 120, Lowe House Office Building. 1 p.m.Senate Finance Committee, overview of Mental Health Administration, effect of budget deficit on mental health services, 3 East Miller Senate Building.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The state's Mental Hygiene Administration didn't have adequate procedures to ensure consumers given care were eligible, according to audit by the Department of Legislative Services during fiscal 2013. The state funds in question totaled $16.4 million. The total budget that year was $788 million when federal funds were counted. The audit also found reviews weren't done in a timely manner by an accounting firm hired to monitor some of the agency's fiscal functions, with some reviews taking up to an extra 21 months.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
After months of investigation, military authorities charged four sailors Wednesday in the deaths of two Navy divers at the "Super Pond" at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Chief Warrant Officer 3rd Class Jason M. Bennett, Senior Chief Navy Diver James C. Burger, Senior Chief Navy Diver David C. Jones and Chief Navy Diver Gary G. Ladd Jr. were charged with dereliction of duty in the deaths of Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 29, and Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 22. The divers and the defendants were members of the elite Mobile Salvage and Diving Unit 2, based in Virginia Beach, Va. The charges were the first to be brought in the deaths of Reyher and Harris.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
Dr. Stanley Roy Platman, a retired psychiatrist and health administrator recalled as a champion of community-based mental health services, died after heart surgery May 7 at MedStar Union Memorial Hospital. The Guilford resident was 79. "Stanley would take on as patients human beings most others in his field would not," said Ellen Callegary, an attorney who represents clients with disabilities and lives in Baltimore. "He helped people with complex needs, including those with developmental disabilities and mental illnesses.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
Thanks for Tim Wheeler 's report that Marylanders understand some of the connections between climate change and human health ("Most Marylanders see climate change harming health," July 17). Last week during a lengthy heat wave, a Massachusetts postman collapsed and died on his route. Many of the local papers covering the story failed to mention climate change as a factor in his death. In fact, outdoor workers are more at risk from extreme heat, and the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has prepared a guide for companies whose employees "spend a substantial portion of the shift outdoors.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | April 29, 2008
Officials from the state's largest union say they have filed a complaint with a state health agency on behalf of employees at the city's child welfare services office, 1510 Guilford Ave., citing reports of active asbestos found in the building over the weekend. Joe Lawrence, a spokesman for the Maryland chapter of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, said contractors worked on the building and found what they believed to be asbestos on pipes. But Brian Wilbon, deputy secretary for operations for the Department of Human Resources, said no contractors worked on the building this weekend, and that the building was inspected twice in the past year and no asbestos was found.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | November 8, 2001
Howard County's health officer will head a new state health agency expected to play an important role in preparing the state to defend against bioterrorism and in responding to any new bioterrorism scare or incident. Dr. Diane L. Matuszak, a 19-year veteran of public health service and Howard's health officer since May 1999, will leave Dec. 26 to become director of the Maryland Community Health Administration. The 4-month-old agency has an annual budget of $79 million and supervises the 24 local health departments in the state.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
Donna Bethea, a health care analyst and longtime Northwest Baltimore resident, died of leukemia Tuesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. She was 44. Ms. Bethea was born in Baltimore and raised on Brighton Avenue. She was a 1985 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. She earned a bachelor's degree in 2009 in information technology from the University of Phoenix, and two weeks ago had completed the course work for a master's degree in health administration, also from the University of Phoenix, family members said.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | October 15, 1995
Although Maryland workplaces, on average, have among the top safety records in the nation, the state's safety regulatory agency is one of the most overwhelmed. The 43 Maryland Occupational Safety and Health inspectors can visit only a tiny percentage of the state's more than 70,000 work sites. But controversy has erupted over MOSH's most recent effort to address the problem. Union officials say the state may endanger workers if MOSH adopts a 2-year-old federal experiment in which safety agencies offer exemptions from surprise inspections to companies with approved safety programs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2010
Carbon monoxide leaks occur most often in winter, typically occurring when an improperly vented furnace is turned on for the season and worsening as the weather grows colder and the furnace runs more frequently. The lethal, odorless fumes are also associated with improperly vented hot water heaters, as well as with generators powered by gasoline or kerosene. People can also suffer carbon monoxide poisoning while warming up a car in a closed garage. "Carbon monoxide is silent and there is no smoke associated with it," Clifford S. Mitchell, assistant director for environmental health and food safety at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, said Sunday.
NEWS
By Barbara A. Res | March 5, 2014
In an effort to be trendy and to tap into a market that appears ripe for the picking, toy companies are newly trying to attract a female audience to building toys, blocks and gears that can be put together to make buildings and inventions. Ostensibly, the idea is to get girls interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) careers, especially engineering. But playing with building tools can also inspire girls to enter the construction trades, and more should be done to encourage this, starting in childhood and continuing through school, in training programs and in industry.
NEWS
October 23, 2013
It's not every day that a major corporation announces that it will bring 1,000 jobs to Baltimore City, so we have reason to cheer Amazon.com's decision to open a 1 million square foot distribution center here. Baltimore's official unemployment rate stands at 10.8 percent, and if you count people who have dropped out of the workforce, it's much higher than that. We need any jobs we can get. Meanwhile, the establishment of a physical presence for the company here means that Amazon will have to start charging sales tax on Marylanders' purchases, and while we all may rue the end of that loophole in the tax collection system, it's a good thing both for Maryland-based retailers and for the state treasury.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
After months of investigation, military authorities charged four sailors Wednesday in the deaths of two Navy divers at the "Super Pond" at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Chief Warrant Officer 3rd Class Jason M. Bennett, Senior Chief Navy Diver James C. Burger, Senior Chief Navy Diver David C. Jones and Chief Navy Diver Gary G. Ladd Jr. were charged with dereliction of duty in the deaths of Diver 1st Class James Reyher, 29, and Diver 2nd Class Ryan Harris, 22. The divers and the defendants were members of the elite Mobile Salvage and Diving Unit 2, based in Virginia Beach, Va. The charges were the first to be brought in the deaths of Reyher and Harris.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2013
Howard E. Chaney, a retired Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene official whose career spanned more than three decades, died Sunday of cancer at his Lutherville home. He was 95. Howard Edward Chaney was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated from the Polytechnic Institute in 1935. He then took a job as a laboratory assistant with the state Department of Health - now the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene - in the Division of Chemistry, where his job was washing glassware and test tubes.
NEWS
July 19, 2013
Thanks for Tim Wheeler 's report that Marylanders understand some of the connections between climate change and human health ("Most Marylanders see climate change harming health," July 17). Last week during a lengthy heat wave, a Massachusetts postman collapsed and died on his route. Many of the local papers covering the story failed to mention climate change as a factor in his death. In fact, outdoor workers are more at risk from extreme heat, and the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration has prepared a guide for companies whose employees "spend a substantial portion of the shift outdoors.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
Dr. Ruth H. Singer, a retired physician who was a state health administrator and later worked in AIDS and HIV treatment at Chase Brexton Health Services, died of pancreatic cancer May 27 at her North Baltimore home. She was 69. "What one loved about Ruth is that she never held back," said Dr. Alfred "Al" Sommer, dean emeritus of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. "If something was too soft and dreamy, she insisted on facing the practical nature of the course of action and hoped for an outcome.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The freight train that derailed Tuesday in Rosedale carried one chemical classified as hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation and another that also posed risks for firefighters and others at the scene even though not similarly classified. There might have been residues aboard of a third chemical that also is highly corrosive and hazardous. State health officials, however, said the incident represented only a low risk to the public. CSX spokesman Gary Sease said at least one of the dozen rail cars that appeared to be involved in the derailment contained sodium chlorate.
NEWS
By Barbara A. Res | March 5, 2014
In an effort to be trendy and to tap into a market that appears ripe for the picking, toy companies are newly trying to attract a female audience to building toys, blocks and gears that can be put together to make buildings and inventions. Ostensibly, the idea is to get girls interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) careers, especially engineering. But playing with building tools can also inspire girls to enter the construction trades, and more should be done to encourage this, starting in childhood and continuing through school, in training programs and in industry.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
The freight train that derailed Tuesday in Rosedale carried one chemical classified as hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation and another that also posed risks for firefighters and others at the scene even though not similarly classified. There might have been residues aboard of a third chemical that also is highly corrosive and hazardous. State health officials, however, said the incident represented only a low risk to the public. CSX spokesman Gary Sease said at least one of the dozen rail cars that appeared to be involved in the derailment contained sodium chlorate.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
Researchers commissioned by the Defense Department said Monday that decades-old limits on lead exposure are inadequate to protect the health of workers on military firing ranges. Moreover, the National Academy of Science reported, lead from ammunition fired on Army, Navy and Air Force ranges in the last five years has "frequently exceeded" those limits, "in some cases by several orders of magnitude. " Sen. Ben Cardin expressed concern about the report's implications for workers at Maryland installations with firing ranges, such as Aberdeen Proving Ground in Harford County.
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