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By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | December 1, 2008
People passing Mount Auburn Cemetery in Westport will see an unusual sight these days: headstones. For years, most of the graves at the historic cemetery - believed to be the oldest final resting place open to Baltimore's black residents - had disappeared behind a veil of honeysuckle vines, brambles and small trees. But a crew of inmates is slowly clearing the overgrown brush with hand tools, the first step toward the eventual restoration of these neglected burial sites. The congregation of Sharp Street United Methodist Church, which owns the cemetery, could never afford to pay a landscaper to do this work, said the Rev. Dellyne Hinton, senior pastor of the church.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
A small group gathered Saturday at Baltimore Cemetery for the unveiling of a headstone for Norman "Chubby" Chaney, a child star in "The Little Rascals" whose grave had gone unmarked for 76 years. The small constellation of fans was brought together by Detroit-area rock musician Mikal C.G., who led an online fundraising drive to buy stones for Chaney and his mother. He led the low-key ceremony Saturday, giving a short speech and pulling a white sheet off markers, to coos of "beautiful!"
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NEWS
September 15, 1996
Hundreds of people gathered at the Baltimore National Cemetery yesterday to dedicate four headstones to Marines who died in World War II.The Maryland chapter of the 1st Marine Corps Division Association held the ceremony to honor four of the six Marine divisions that fought during the war.The other two divisions -- the 1st and the 4th -- dedicated similar headstones at the cemetery in previous years."
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2012
The numerous descendants of Henry Lightner may have inherited the mettle he displayed in battle when they set out to trace their roots, find his unmarked grave and after nearly 130 years honor him with a proper monument. Many had heard the tale of the "Drummer Boy of Fort McHenry," the 16-year-old who joined the militia and played his drum during the march to Fort McHenry, where the decisive Battle of Baltimore occurred during the War of 1812. The drummer, who stood out in a red coat, carried commanders' orders to the embattled troops.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | September 23, 1991
Terry Bush walked out of his home on the grounds of the Hebrew-Friendship Cemetery in Southeast Baltimore yesterday morning, preparing to cut grass or trim hedges.Instead, he found row upon row of headstones -- many dating back to the early 1800s -- toppled and broken. He counted 256 headstones lying in the grass or in walkways."I was mostly mad," said Mr. Bush, caretaker of the cemetery for five years. "It was unbelievable. It was disgusting. I can't see how a person could do something like that."
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,special to the sun | October 28, 2007
Amid thorns and brush, two headstones belonging to Civil War veterans jut up from an abandoned cemetery near Havre de Grace. Just off Route 155 near Elizabeth Street, the cemetery sits atop a hill surrounded by woods, hidden from passers-by. Known as Cedar Hill, the cemetery is one of many abandoned burial grounds in Harford County. While the cemeteries are swallowed slowly by nature, marred by vandals and buried by development, a growing effort is being made to preserve gravesites and the history they represent.
NEWS
November 23, 1994
Two Baltimore youths were arrested Monday afternoon and charged as juveniles in the vandalism at Cedar Hill Cemetery this month, police said.The youths, both 17, live in the Brooklyn area of the city. They were charged with malicious destruction of property and cemetery desecration and released into their parents' custody, police said.A caretaker discovered Nov. 5 that 40 headstones had been knocked over in the cemetery, located in the 5800 block of Ritchie Highway. He told police the headstones were overturned sometime between 7 a.m. that day and 5 p.m. the previous day.The damage was estimated at $20,000.
NEWS
By Andrew Reiner | October 31, 2000
EVERY YEAR at this time, when the landscape drains of its chromatic lifeblood, I find myself haunting graveyards. There is nothing satanic, gothic or macabre about this. Actually, the thought of death has terrified me since I was a child, and I look horrible in black. It's just that I find comfort in these surroundings, especially during this mystical transition in nature. Maybe I've got some ancient Celtic blood coursing through my Jewish veins, because I feel a strong pull around Halloween to pay homage to souls that departed before I was born.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | June 28, 1992
Kathy Rebeck flinched each time one of the mature trees snapped in her Turf Valley Overlook neighborhood."Lord, I hate that sound," she said over the whine of bulldozers.The sights and sounds of bulldozers clearing decades-old poplar and walnut trees in the middle of her neighborhood Thursday was cacophonous enough. But even more insulting, she said, was the fact that these trees are in the middle of what was St. Mary's Cemetery on Cemetery Lane.Rebeck, who with about 35 of her neighbors formed the group Friends of St. Mary's Cemetery and Preservation Society, contend that there are bodies buried throughout a 3.21 acre parcel now being developed as two lots.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
After more than a week of hacking away at underbrush and weedy trees, landscape workers have tamed nearly 30 years of neglect at one of Baltimore's oldest Roman Catholic cemeteries. The 7-acre St. Vincent DePaul Cemetery, which is surrounded by Clifton Park, has emerged from its first cleanup since it officially closed in the 1980s. Workers cleared away tall grasses, unruly trees and nearly five tons of debris around four sections of askew grave markers and upturned headstones. Their work revealed the names, incised into limestone, of old Irish, Italian and German families who were members of the downtown Baltimore parish located near the main post office.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | September 14, 2012
It's been two years since some descendants began agitating for recognition and reverence for their ancestors' resting place in an unmarked, abandoned 7-acre cemetery surrounded by the Clifton Park golf course. The group, the Friends of St. Vincent Cemetery, gave me its approximate location - on a small rise overlooking downtown Baltimore near the Belair Road side of the Northeast Baltimore park. When I initially explored the place two years ago, I found nothing but weeds and was about to give up and leave, when I spotted a few scattered granite headstones under a tangle of sumac.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2012
Though Norman Chaney has lain in obscurity for nearly 76 years, thanks largely to the generosity of Baltimore, the child star is getting a headstone. In May fans launched a campaign to raise money to mark the grave of Chaney, a Baltimore native, who won a national contest in 1929 to become "Chubby," the new "fat kid" in the popular film series "Our Gang. " Though he quickly won hearts with his round cheeks and charm, Chaney, the son of a Baltimore electrical worker, left after just two seasons, returning to Baltimore, where he went to school, eventually became sickly and died at 21 just as most young people's careers are taking off. He was buried in Baltimore Cemetery in an unmarked grave.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Only people who know where to look would be able to pay respects to Norman Chaney, who is buried in an unmarked grave in Baltimore. But if fans of the chubby "Our Gang" star have their way, he'll soon have the headstone he's done so long without. Chaney, the son of a Baltimore electrical worker, won a national contest in 1929 to become "Chubby," the new "fat kid" in the popular film series, replacing the original Chubby, who had grown out of the role. But with his impossibly round face and impish charm, Chaney eclipsed his predecessor - becoming the fat kid people remembered.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
In a shady clearing in Stevens Forest, not far from a paved pathway off Thunder Hill Road, a cluster of granite headstones marks the graves of six members of the family of George Cooke, a wealthy antebellum farmer. The two largest markers, which are about 4 feet tall and lean side-by-side at the same angle, belong to Cooke and his wife, Eleanor, who died within four years of each other, in 1849 and 1853. Weathered engraving on a pair of smaller headstones shows that two of their 12 children, Elizabeth Powel and Mary Cooke, died before their parents, at ages 26 and 16, respectively.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 22, 2011
Paul Francis "Knobby" Harris Sr., a retired lawyer, former professional baseball player and author who wrote about the life of Babe Ruth, died Friday of cancer and heart disease at his Catonsville home. He was 85. Born and raised in West Baltimore, Mr. Harris graduated from St. Edward Parochial School and from Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington in 1943. He had picked up the nickname of "Knobby" from his father, after arriving home one day with a bump on his head from a fall.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
After more than a week of hacking away at underbrush and weedy trees, landscape workers have tamed nearly 30 years of neglect at one of Baltimore's oldest Roman Catholic cemeteries. The 7-acre St. Vincent DePaul Cemetery, which is surrounded by Clifton Park, has emerged from its first cleanup since it officially closed in the 1980s. Workers cleared away tall grasses, unruly trees and nearly five tons of debris around four sections of askew grave markers and upturned headstones. Their work revealed the names, incised into limestone, of old Irish, Italian and German families who were members of the downtown Baltimore parish located near the main post office.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr | November 25, 1990
Vandals at one of Baltimore's largest cemeteries indiscriminately toppled about 300 headstones and monuments -- some dating from the mid-1800s -- late Friday or early yesterday, police reported.The grave markers were overturned in eight of the oldest sections of the 100-acre Baltimore Cemetery, known for its distinctive castle-like gates at the east end of North Avenue at Rose Street."When you don't have respect for the cemetery and the dead, what do you have respect for?" said Joseph T. Poore, 48, foreman at the cemetery and one of the workers who discovered the damage early yesterday.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | October 23, 1999
ONE RECENT WEEKDAY evening I was racing down the Jones Falls Expressway with my eye on the clock and my 14-year-old son in the front seat of the car. The kid and I were running out of time and light. We had to get to a cemetery before sundown.Why would anyone need to get to a cemetery before dark? If you guessed "last-minute school project," you must be a veteran parent. As a veteran, you know the basics of this drama.Basic No. 1: Procrastination: Even though the assignment was made some time ago, the kid becomes concerned about it only as the deadline nears.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | December 1, 2008
People passing Mount Auburn Cemetery in Westport will see an unusual sight these days: headstones. For years, most of the graves at the historic cemetery - believed to be the oldest final resting place open to Baltimore's black residents - had disappeared behind a veil of honeysuckle vines, brambles and small trees. But a crew of inmates is slowly clearing the overgrown brush with hand tools, the first step toward the eventual restoration of these neglected burial sites. The congregation of Sharp Street United Methodist Church, which owns the cemetery, could never afford to pay a landscaper to do this work, said the Rev. Dellyne Hinton, senior pastor of the church.
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