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Heading South

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NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2001
As Canada geese migrate south for winter, so do some of their human counterparts. Sailors from the north are among the thousands of visitors who flock to Annapolis for the annual United States Sailboat Show. The crowds transform the quaint capital into a bustling maritime metropolis with congested streets, packed hotels, crowded waterways and overflowing restaurants. While show organizers estimate that hundreds of Canadians may come by car, RV or airplane, dozens more come by sea while on their way to warmer southern climates.
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
SARASOTA, Fla. -- The Orioles will travel to Fort Myers, Fla., today for a 1:05 p.m. game against the Minnesota Twins . Right-hander Bud Norris will start for the Orioles. Other available pitchers include Zach Britton , Alfredo Aceves , Brad Brach , Tommy Hunter , Evan Meek and minor leaguers Chris Jones, Tim Alderson and Fabio Castillo . The sun is finally out here at the Ed Smith Stadium complex, and the forecast seemed to be OK for Fort Myers.
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FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 25, 2006
Heading South is a hydra-headed love story, as dangerous as it is heated and complex. For the sexy middle-aged female tourists in this pre-AIDS period piece (set in the 1970s), frolicking with handsome Haitian men on glittering beaches and then taking them to bed is an experience both earthy and transcendent. Even when these women think they can keep their sexuality in perspective, they can't gauge how much the warmth, beauty and erotic release of lovemaking with these dream mates comes to mean for them.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2012
When Towson athletic director Mike Waddell broached the idea with Rob Ambrose of taking his football team down to play LSU in Baton Rouge for the fourth game of the 2012 season, the Tigers' coach was decidedly lukewarm. The initial discussion took place two summers ago before the athletic department's annual crab feast in Ocean City . At the time, Towson was coming off a 1-10 season in 2010 after going 2-9 in Ambrose's first year at his alma mater. Their turnaround 9-3 season in 2011 was still months away.
NEWS
May 14, 1993
Westminster woman injured on Route 29A Westminster woman was seriously injured yesterday in a two-car collision after she tried to make a left turn on U.S. Route 29 in Columbia in front of a Ford Thunderbird, county police said.Joan Niner, 40, was taken by ambulance to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, where she is listed in serious condition, a hospital spokeswoman said.The Thunderbird's driver, Stephen Thompson, 29, of the 9300 block of Matador Road, was taken to a hospital, where he was treated for minor injuries and released, said police Officer Kevin Gavin.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1996
The parents of a 6-year-old girl killed when she was hit by a car along Ritchie Highway in 1995 filed a $2 million wrongful death suit in Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday against the driver who allegedly hit her.Randall and Dottie Ruscito, of the 600 block of High St., Chestertown, allege that Joi Lynn Hurley, of the 4000 block of Tudor Hall Road, Riva, was negligent in the Sept. 17 accident that killed their daughter.Evelyn Ruscito was hit shortly before 8: 30 p.m. near Ritchie Highway's intersection with Coachmans Road in Severna Park.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser | November 26, 2006
Linda Pastan, who lives in Maryland, is a master of the kind of water-clear writing that enables us to see into the depths. This is a poem about migrating birds, but also one about how it feels to witness the passing of another year. - Ted Kooser "The Birds" are heading south, pulled by a compass in the genes. They are not fooled by this odd November summer, though we stand in our doorways wearing cotton dresses. We are watching them as they swoop and gather -- the shadow of wings falls over the heart.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 22, 2002
A 26-year-old passenger in a car that state police said reached speeds of more than 100 mph as two drivers played "cat and mouse" on Interstate 83 was killed Thursday night when the cars collided in Timonium and closed the road for three hours. Jeffrey D. Staniewski, of the 800 block of Staffordshire Road, Cockeysville, was taken by ambulance to Sinai Hospital, where he was pronounced dead shortly after the 10 p.m. accident. Police said that Michael B. Layton, 27, of the 200 block of St. David Court, Cockeysville, was heading south in a black Mazda Miata convertible on I-83 when the accident occurred.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and John Rivera and Peter Hermann and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1996
A man charged with stealing an MTA bus from a Baltimore garage and leading police on a wild chase into Virginia was angry with his family and with a transit officer who arrested him last year, police said yesterday.Dewane Edward Rickman "was mad at some people," said Virginia State Police Lt. M. G. Millner, who supervised part of the 80-mile chase Tuesday night. "Part of it was domestic, and part of it had to do with a police encounter in Baltimore."Millner would not elaborate on the domestic problem.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | July 14, 2003
A woman who was killed when the vintage car in which she was riding was hit by a sport utility vehicle on Interstate 95 in Joppa was a 77-year-old Baltimore County resident, state police said yesterday. Gertrude Welkie of the 1700 block of Searles Road in the Stanbrook section of Dundalk was thrown Saturday night from the front passenger seat of a 1948 Chrysler Windsor, state police at the John F. Kennedy barracks said. She was taken by ambulance to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and died a short time later.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | July 3, 2012
The Orioles acquired a big-time character guy when they traded two prospects for 41-year-old slugger and proven winner Jim Thome. Let's hope it's not too late. The O's are still a few games above .500 and entered Tuesday night's game among the top five teams in the American League, but they are looking less and less like a wild-card team and more and more like a group of frustrated, inconsistent guys who have an excellent chance to arrive at the All-Star break in fourth place.
SPORTS
December 17, 2009
The bowl season can't start fast enough for Pac-10 basketball teams. If only for a few weeks, the conference's football teams will pull the spotlight away from what has been an ugly hoops season. A combination of NBA draft defections, coaching turnover and a paucity of standout players has created a tide of mediocrity from the Pacific Northwest to the Sonoran Desert. Through Tuesday, Pac-10 teams were a combined 5-19 against members of the other five power conferences. The Pac-10 even has struggled against the Mountain West (3-4)
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | December 10, 2007
Readers of my last column agreed enthusiastically that Interstate 95 south of Washington takes the crown as the worst traffic nightmare in the Mid-Atlantic states during peak holiday travel. Quite a few of them offered the same alternate route: a pleasant jaunt through Southern Maryland via U.S. 301, crossing into Virginia on the Governor Harry W. Nice Memorial Bridge. Among the readers who recommended such a strategy were Ann Heether and Ted Lingelbach of Parkville. "We agree that I-495 and I-95 South in Northern Virginia are a Nightmare," they wrote.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | January 10, 2007
While other students are relaxing during Howard Community College's winter break, 19-year-old Amber Gillette of Laurel is planning to do hard labor, knocking down walls and tearing up floors for free. "I'm looking forward to that," she said. Gillette is one of 10 HCC students who have decided to spend their break rehabilitating houses in Mississippi to help people who were affected by Hurricane Katrina in 2005. The group leaves tomorrow under the guidance of Carol Parreco, coordinator of service learning for the college.
NEWS
By Ted Kooser | November 26, 2006
Linda Pastan, who lives in Maryland, is a master of the kind of water-clear writing that enables us to see into the depths. This is a poem about migrating birds, but also one about how it feels to witness the passing of another year. - Ted Kooser "The Birds" are heading south, pulled by a compass in the genes. They are not fooled by this odd November summer, though we stand in our doorways wearing cotton dresses. We are watching them as they swoop and gather -- the shadow of wings falls over the heart.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 25, 2006
Heading South is a hydra-headed love story, as dangerous as it is heated and complex. For the sexy middle-aged female tourists in this pre-AIDS period piece (set in the 1970s), frolicking with handsome Haitian men on glittering beaches and then taking them to bed is an experience both earthy and transcendent. Even when these women think they can keep their sexuality in perspective, they can't gauge how much the warmth, beauty and erotic release of lovemaking with these dream mates comes to mean for them.
NEWS
By Jody K. Vilschick and Jody K. Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2003
I'VE ASKED readers to identify the worst places to drive in Maryland, and they haven't been shy about suggesting candidates. Some places made today's column because they seem to attract clueless or reckless drivers, others because of consistent congestion, and some because of hills, twists and turns or poor visibility. A number of e-mails suggest entire stretches of highway, such as "I-95 from here to New Jersey," from Erick Lander of Columbia, or "the whole Baltimore Beltway, especially at the Wilkens Avenue exit," from Marian Arminger of Arbutus.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
METULA, Israel -- As the heat rose yesterday along the border with Lebanon, a 27-year-old tank gunner named Avi stood amid the stubble of a wheat field with his battalion awaiting orders: to go north for expanded battles against Hezbollah, or to go south, back toward their families and homes and a quieter Middle East. Both possibilities hung in the air, even after the United Nations Security Council voted last night unanimously in favor of a resolution calling for a halt in the fighting.
BUSINESS
By ALLISON CONNOLLY and ALLISON CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
The city is losing a historic manufacturer as Pemco International, which was started in Baltimore nearly 100 years ago as a family business and grew to be a multinational corporation, pulls up stakes and heads south. The company, which makes porcelain enamel coatings for kitchen and bathroom appliances, barbecue grills and floor tiles, announced yesterday that it is consolidating operations at its plant in Leesburg, Ala. It marks the end of a Baltimore pioneer that gave Howard Johnson hotels and restaurants their distinctive orange-colored roofing.
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