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By RITA ST. CLAIR | September 30, 1990
Q: I'm looking for a new headboard for my average-size bedroom, which has traditional mahogany furniture, a dark wood floor and off-white walls. Can you suggest an interesting design, not necessarily in wood, that would help make the room look a bit larger and more sophisticated?A: Let me encourage you not to add more wood to a setting that already has quite enough. As an alternative, you might also try creating a headboard out of fabric. The photo depicts just that sort of solution.This treatment may look rather elaborate, but it's really quite simple and not as heavy as an actual canopy.
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By Cindy Hoedel and Cindy Hoedel,McClatchy-Tribune | March 1, 2008
Is your bed a wallflower or a boudoir star? Ironically, the piece of furniture we lean on the most -- physically and emotionally -- gets the least amount of our attention and interior design resources. "As soon as you look in the room, you want the bed to be the focal point," said interior designer Danie Dunn, owner of Danie Dunn Designs in Kansas City, Mo. "People spend more money on their kitchen and don't even know how to cook. Your bedroom should be your most important priority." Sure, it's important that your bed fit the room and your body.
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SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
PASADENA, Calif. -- Darryl Talley had a mouthful of stitches and a swollen lower lip, but when interviews began last night for Super Bowl XXVII, the veteran Buffalo Bills linebacker was ready to talk.The stitches and swollen lip were the result of an accident in the basement of Talley's Buffalo, N.Y., home."It wasn't a door," Talley said, refuting one report. "It was a headboard."Talley said he was moving a headboard to a storage closet in his basement when he brushed against a furnace pipe and burned his neck.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | February 24, 2008
A thousand bucks, or even $500, can go a long way toward transforming a room - and your attitude toward your home. Whether they're contemporary lamp shades or new doors, upgrades make a difference. Here are a few suggestions from interior designers: Reframe art work. `'Do five to 10 pieces," says Ken Dietz, principal designer, Dietz & Associates, Jamaica Plain, Mass. `'Get coordinating frames and create a gallery wall." Change the bathroom vanity. Consider a vessel sink. "It can be a dramatic change without too much trouble," says Edwina Drummond Boose, owner of Edwina Drummond Interiors, Waltham, Mass.
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By Rita St. Clair | March 22, 1992
Q: The space between two windows at either end of a long wall seems like a perfect place for me to put an oversized bed. I'm therefore thinking about buying such a piece -- probably something in a contemporary design. But I don't know what sort of treatment I should give to the wall. I'm especially concerned NTC about a possible clash between the headboard and the window coverings. What do you recommend?A: Symmetry should be your guiding principle, since the placement of the windows requires a balanced design.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | February 24, 2008
A thousand bucks, or even $500, can go a long way toward transforming a room - and your attitude toward your home. Whether they're contemporary lamp shades or new doors, upgrades make a difference. Here are a few suggestions from interior designers: Reframe art work. `'Do five to 10 pieces," says Ken Dietz, principal designer, Dietz & Associates, Jamaica Plain, Mass. `'Get coordinating frames and create a gallery wall." Change the bathroom vanity. Consider a vessel sink. "It can be a dramatic change without too much trouble," says Edwina Drummond Boose, owner of Edwina Drummond Interiors, Waltham, Mass.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | January 27, 2008
Today's design scene presents new challenges and rewards for non-professionals. That's because coordinated sets of furniture have all but vanished from the market, leaving it up to homeowners to put together their own furniture selections and room designs. The opportunities are exciting, but the practical considerations can be daunting. For example, many furniture shoppers probably wish for the return of the matching bed-and-night-tables combination. It eliminated the difficulty of finding a type of table that would go well with a particular style of bed. And the pair of tables included in the matched set were usually large enough to accommodate books, magazines, a clock-radio and a glass of water, as well as a reading lamp.
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By RITA ST. CLAIR | October 27, 1991
Q: With another baby on the way, I want to move my young daughter into a currently unused room. But I'm perplexed about where to put the bed, which has 5-foot headboard posts. There's only one wall without openings, and it begins to slant about 3 feet above the floor. I'd like your advice on this problem and on the overall design of the room.A: The first thing to understand is that a bed doesn't always have to be placed against a wall. It can be pulled out a few feet. As the accompanying photo shows, that would be one simple solution to your dilemma.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 12, 1998
Many interior designers, myself included, will gladly reconfigure a bed whenever a style-conscious client requests it. Giving an old bed a new look can be a practical challenge as well as an opportunity to give form to a fantasy. That's why so many different designs -- from beds in the shapes of mythical swans to headboards that look like bookcases -- have been attempted at one time or another.The so-called Hollywood Bed of the 1930s ushered in one of the biggest changes in modern American bed design.
FEATURES
By Cindy Hoedel and Cindy Hoedel,McClatchy-Tribune | March 1, 2008
Is your bed a wallflower or a boudoir star? Ironically, the piece of furniture we lean on the most -- physically and emotionally -- gets the least amount of our attention and interior design resources. "As soon as you look in the room, you want the bed to be the focal point," said interior designer Danie Dunn, owner of Danie Dunn Designs in Kansas City, Mo. "People spend more money on their kitchen and don't even know how to cook. Your bedroom should be your most important priority." Sure, it's important that your bed fit the room and your body.
BUSINESS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | January 27, 2008
Today's design scene presents new challenges and rewards for non-professionals. That's because coordinated sets of furniture have all but vanished from the market, leaving it up to homeowners to put together their own furniture selections and room designs. The opportunities are exciting, but the practical considerations can be daunting. For example, many furniture shoppers probably wish for the return of the matching bed-and-night-tables combination. It eliminated the difficulty of finding a type of table that would go well with a particular style of bed. And the pair of tables included in the matched set were usually large enough to accommodate books, magazines, a clock-radio and a glass of water, as well as a reading lamp.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 12, 1998
Many interior designers, myself included, will gladly reconfigure a bed whenever a style-conscious client requests it. Giving an old bed a new look can be a practical challenge as well as an opportunity to give form to a fantasy. That's why so many different designs -- from beds in the shapes of mythical swans to headboards that look like bookcases -- have been attempted at one time or another.The so-called Hollywood Bed of the 1930s ushered in one of the biggest changes in modern American bed design.
NEWS
By Sally Buckler and Sally Buckler,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 1997
GIVE KIDS at Lisbon Elementary School some old trash, and they'll turn it into art.Under the leadership of art teacher Leonore Pisano, children at the school turned cast-off odds and ends into a 4-foot-tall, 7-foot-long dragon, which graces the lobby of the Lisbon Branch of Sandy Spring National Bank.Last year, for the fifth straight year, Pisano arranged for an artist-in-residence to spend time at the school.Supported by a matching grant from the Howard County Arts Council and the Lisbon Parent Teacher Association, Mary Opasik spent eight days at Lisbon.
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By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | October 2, 1994
If your favorite room could use a makeover, but a quick fix is all your budget allows, take heart. Design cosmetics, deftly applied, can be as dramatic as a room re-do. The best part is, they don't have to cost a bundle.To get your creative juices flowing, here are five ideas that will help spruce up almost any room in the house. None of these perk-ups involves moving or acquiring even a stitch of furniture, except for building on something you already have.Take the bedroom and its centerpiece, the bed. You don't need an elegant four-poster bed to make a room.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | January 26, 1993
PASADENA, Calif. -- Darryl Talley had a mouthful of stitches and a swollen lower lip, but when interviews began last night for Super Bowl XXVII, the veteran Buffalo Bills linebacker was ready to talk.The stitches and swollen lip were the result of an accident in the basement of Talley's Buffalo, N.Y., home."It wasn't a door," Talley said, refuting one report. "It was a headboard."Talley said he was moving a headboard to a storage closet in his basement when he brushed against a furnace pipe and burned his neck.
NEWS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 2, 1992
Bedrooms are often seen -- from a purely decorative standpoint -- as the dullest parts of the house. Or so it would seem from the letters I receive. Many readers ask for my advice on how they might enliven their bedrooms.Most of these letter-writers also mention that the size of their redecorating budget is as small as the room itself. At the same time, I'm often told of a need for greater storage space. So it can indeed be a challenge to reconcile these various issues, especially when the room must accommodate a king-size bed.The initial step toward a solution is to understand the proper order of priorities.
NEWS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 2, 1992
Bedrooms are often seen -- from a purely decorative standpoint -- as the dullest parts of the house. Or so it would seem from the letters I receive. Many readers ask for my advice on how they might enliven their bedrooms.Most of these letter-writers also mention that the size of their redecorating budget is as small as the room itself. At the same time, I'm often told of a need for greater storage space. So it can indeed be a challenge to reconcile these various issues, especially when the room must accommodate a king-size bed.The initial step toward a solution is to understand the proper order of priorities.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 1, 1992
Q: I've often seen iron furniture in the settings shown in design magazines. That has inspired me to redo my bedroom with a combination of wood and iron pieces. But now I wonder whether iron will make the room seem too stark and cold. What do you think?Also, how should I treat the rest of the space? I'd prefer a soft, contemporary look.A: First, a bit of history.Originally, iron furniture was used on stone, marble or tile floors. Its strong lines and firm texture go well with such hard surfaces.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair | March 22, 1992
Q: The space between two windows at either end of a long wall seems like a perfect place for me to put an oversized bed. I'm therefore thinking about buying such a piece -- probably something in a contemporary design. But I don't know what sort of treatment I should give to the wall. I'm especially concerned NTC about a possible clash between the headboard and the window coverings. What do you recommend?A: Symmetry should be your guiding principle, since the placement of the windows requires a balanced design.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 1, 1992
Q: I've often seen iron furniture in the settings shown in design magazines. That has inspired me to redo my bedroom with a combination of wood and iron pieces. But now I wonder whether iron will make the room seem too stark and cold. What do you think?Also, how should I treat the rest of the space? I'd prefer a soft, contemporary look.A: First, a bit of history.Originally, iron furniture was used on stone, marble or tile floors. Its strong lines and firm texture go well with such hard surfaces.
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