Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHead Start Program
IN THE NEWS

Head Start Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Over the past decade, multiple studies have confirmed that spending on high-quality early childhood education is a wise investment and a successful hedge against poverty. Children who attend Head Start, America's comprehensive early childhood education program for poor children, are better prepared to start kindergarten, less likely to be referred to special education programs and more likely to graduate from high school. They are also less likely to be incarcerated as adults and more likely to be successful, contributing members of society.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Changes to Baltimore's Head Start this fall will provide longer days and an extended school year for hundreds of children in its care, a move intended to help low-income parents free up time for work and boost the youngsters' development. Under a federal pilot initiative that gives the city more local control over the early education program, Head Start also will shift its focus to younger children by serving more of them, transferring many older children to pre-K programs in city schools.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
Four-year-old Hylah Haynes had an hourlong car ride each day this past school year to get to her Head Start program in Ellicott City. Franora Gray said the ride was worth it. "The program has so much," Gray said, noting that her daughter has received instruction in Spanish before even starting school. Gray spoke before County Executive Ken Ulman, Councilwoman Courtney Watson of Ellicott City and members of the county's General Assembly delegation at an event last month held by the faith-based group People Acting Together in Howard, or PATH, urging them to allocate money to move two Head Start classrooms from Ellicott City to Columbia's Long Reach village.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
Dr. Robert E. Cooke, a retired Johns Hopkins pediatrician-in-chief who was a founder of the Head Start children's program and a presidential medical adviser, died of heart disease Feb. 2 at his Oak Bluffs home on Martha's Vineyard, Mass. The former North Roland Park resident was 93. "We have lost a true visionary, whose acumen, passion and dedication have influenced generations of pediatricians and changed the lives of millions of children," said Dr. Paul B. Rothman, dean of the medical faculty and chief executive officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
Nearly 30 years later, these words still haunt Tim King: "It's raining, Timothy!"But it wasn't water pelting the second-grader as he ran home from school in rural Auburn, Ala. It was a shower of rocks -- thrown by white classmates.Today, Mr. King credits a variety of factors for giving him the courage to return to Cary Woods Elementary School: His mother's steadfast belief in desegregation. His love of learning. And a brand new social program called Head Start.As the federal preschool program celebrates its 30th birthday in Baltimore today with a parade at War Memorial Plaza, success stories like Mr. King's abound.
NEWS
By Ellen J. Silberman and Ellen J. Silberman,States News Service | December 2, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Three months ago, the young, HIV-infected mother was living on the street and using drugs. Today, she has a home and is about to return to school to become a nurse's aide.The Baltimore City Head Start Program guided her through that transition, and it will also help pay for her education. Because of that kind of work, the federal government honored the program yesterday as part of National AIDS Awareness Day."That's what we're all about, helping families," said Clare Siegel, coordinator of the Baltimore City Head Start Program's HIV project.
NEWS
By Cynthia Kammann and Cynthia Kammann,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 16, 1998
THE NORTH county office of the Head Start program, in the Lloyd Keaser Community Center on Belle Grove Road in Pumphrey, is accepting applications for the 1998-1999 school year. The preschool program offers morning and afternoon sessions Monday through Thursday from September through June.The program, using two classrooms in what was a school building before it became a community center seven years ago, took 68 children into preschool last year.Transportation to and from day care is provided, as are snacks and meals.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 31, 2004
The director of the Ashland Head Start program in Gardenville was indicted this month on charges that she stole $335,777 from the organization over a four-year period. A Baltimore grand jury indicted Audrey Marie James, 49, on Dec. 15, charging that she had diverted money into an unauthorized bank account from June 30, 2000, to July 21 of this year. During that time, she ran the Head Start program in the 5400 block of Belair Road. Head Start is a federally funded program for preschool children from low-income families.
NEWS
July 4, 1993
25 Years Ago (Week of June 23-29, 1968):* It was announced this week that Howard County, the first county in the state of Maryland to organize a Head Start program, was in danger of being the first county to drop the program. The county was considering withdrawing support from the Community Action Council, through which the federal funds for the Head Start Program were channeled. The Board of County Commissioners was, however, considering financing Head Start with county funds.* About 37 Howard countians went by bus to Washington, D.C., to participate in Solidarity Day in support of the Poor People's Campaign.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | June 21, 1993
The occasion had all the pomp and circumstance of any graduation -- parents clutching cameras and camcorders, trying to get close to the graduates; distinguished guests waiting to be recognized; graduates in caps and gowns beaming with pride as they lined up to get their diplomas.The only difference was that these graduates, clad in bright pink and blue gowns, stood about 4 feet tall and had their names taped to their chairs, just so there would be no mix-ups in the seating.During an hourlong ceremony Friday morning, about 150 parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings and friends crowded into the Lloyd Keaser Community Center in Pumphrey to celebrate the first graduating class of the center's Head Start program.
NEWS
January 18, 2013
Over the past decade, multiple studies have confirmed that spending on high-quality early childhood education is a wise investment and a successful hedge against poverty. Children who attend Head Start, America's comprehensive early childhood education program for poor children, are better prepared to start kindergarten, less likely to be referred to special education programs and more likely to graduate from high school. They are also less likely to be incarcerated as adults and more likely to be successful, contributing members of society.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2012
Four-year-old Hylah Haynes had an hourlong car ride each day this past school year to get to her Head Start program in Ellicott City. Franora Gray said the ride was worth it. "The program has so much," Gray said, noting that her daughter has received instruction in Spanish before even starting school. Gray spoke before County Executive Ken Ulman, Councilwoman Courtney Watson of Ellicott City and members of the county's General Assembly delegation at an event last month held by the faith-based group People Acting Together in Howard, or PATH, urging them to allocate money to move two Head Start classrooms from Ellicott City to Columbia's Long Reach village.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2011
Just a few years ago, Menita Parson says, she was soft-spoken and shy, the kind of person who would not have dared to address a room full of strangers. But as the mother of two girls who have gone through St. Jerome's Head Start program — and a third who is still there — Parson is ready to speak up. "Head Start is an indispensable part of my life," she said during a news conference Friday at the South Baltimore school, an event held to draw attention to proposed federal budget cuts that could cut more than $1 billion from Head Start nationwide and directly affect the preschool program's efforts at St. Jerome and other neighborhood schools.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2010
Howard County's summer Head Start program for children about to begin kindergarten is fighting to keep operating despite major cuts in state funding. Bita Dayhoff, director of the county's Community Action Council, the private nonprofit group that runs the preschool program, said the state's budget problems have led to reductions of more than half the $103,000 in state money the program received in fiscal 2009. That amount dropped to $55,000 in fiscal 2010 and fell again to $44,000 in the fiscal year that began Thursday, she said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | September 23, 2007
Mary E. Robinson, a Head Start teacher and administrator who later served on the Baltimore City school board, died Thursday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Sinai Hospital. The Ashburton resident was 76. Born Mary Elizabeth Coleman in Memphis, Tenn., she earned a bachelor's degree in music at the University of Evansville in Evansville, Ind., an education degree from what is now Coppin State University and a master's degree from Morgan State University. She also had a deep soprano voice and served as director of a Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church choir for 13 years, family members said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 31, 2004
The director of the Ashland Head Start program in Gardenville was indicted this month on charges that she stole $335,777 from the organization over a four-year period. A Baltimore grand jury indicted Audrey Marie James, 49, on Dec. 15, charging that she had diverted money into an unauthorized bank account from June 30, 2000, to July 21 of this year. During that time, she ran the Head Start program in the 5400 block of Belair Road. Head Start is a federally funded program for preschool children from low-income families.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Sun Staff Writer | December 6, 1994
The group of 3- and 4-year-olds solemnly rolled their sleeves up to their armpits, taking seriously their teacher's warning that the fabric paint would not wash out of their clothes if they were careless.The children were using sponges dipped in the paint to print designs on a tablecloth, getting the room ready for an open house scheduled for 10 a.m. tomorrow to launch the new Head Start center at Meade Village.It is the sixth such center in Anne Arundel County.Seventeen children attend the Meade Village program, which is designed to get preschoolers from low-income families ready to enter school.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Mary Gail Hare contributed to this article | January 29, 1997
After running the Head Start program in Carroll County for more than 30 years, county school officials are dropping out.But schools will continue to offer classroom space if another agency will take over the duties of running the federally funded program, said Gregory Eckles, director of secondary education and acting director of curriculum and staff development."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
Dressed in a bright blue T-shirt with a skateboarder on the front, long red shorts and white sneakers, Kevin Burgess, 5, removed a baby doll from a bin, put her in a toy highchair and pretended to feed her yellow letters from a bowl - all under the close supervision of a little girl dressed in bright pink. Nearby, children waited patiently to help mix batter for pancakes, while others made spiders by pushing pipe cleaners through soft Styrofoam packing peanuts before gluing them to art paper adorned with glitter.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2004
Dressed in a bright blue T-shirt with a skateboarder on the front, long red shorts and white sneakers, Kevin Burgess, 5, removed a baby doll from a bin, put her in a toy highchair and pretended to feed her yellow letters from a bowl - all under the close supervision of a little girl dressed in bright pink. Nearby, children waited patiently to help mix batter for pancakes, while others made spiders by pushing pipe cleaners through soft Styrofoam packing peanuts before gluing them to art paper adorned with glitter.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.