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Head Lice

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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 23, 2001
Q. I've had head lice for weeks and have tried RID, Nix and Vaseline to get rid of them. The lice disappear for about two days and then return. I'm single, so I do the best I can to remove the nits myself. Please help! How common is it to have resistant head lice? A. No one knows how prevalent resistant lice are, but a Harvard study showed that this is a real problem in some parts of the United States. For resistant lice, suffocation with Vaseline works, although the nits must still be removed.
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NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2009
Today we will explore the condition known as "News Scalp," a severe form of itching on the dome region of the skull brought on by reading disturbing insect stories in the daily paper. Apparently, bedbugs are on the rise in Baltimore. Scratch, scratch. Maybe you are like me, and when you finish reading a story like this, you go immediately to the Web to do some research. There you will find truly disgusting visuals that amplify the common bedbug to the point where it has a King-Kong-esque quality.
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NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | August 8, 1999
Q. I am a medical student in London, now visiting the States on holiday. I read your column about head lice and want to suggest a possible solution. In between leaving secondary school and starting medical school, I worked for a year in a boys' boarding school in England. We had many "lice attacks" and found that the most effective way to eliminate them was to use a very fine lice comb with plenty of hair conditioner. Put the conditioner in the hair and then pull the comb through the hair, carefully cleaning it after each stroke.
FEATURES
By Kristen Kridel | January 10, 2008
Lice salons: lousy idea or necessity? Perched in a hairdresser's chair, 9-year-old Grace Lasky raised her eyebrows as a woman slicked one of the salon's specialty products through her long, straight hair. No, Grace wasn't getting her hair styled in the swank Chicago boutique. The woman pulling a fine-toothed comb through the girl's hair was looking for nits, the eggs laid by lice and a recurring annoyance for the third-grader. "It sort of feels itchy," Grace said. Experts don't agree on the usefulness of delousing salons, but that hasn't stopped them from multiplying.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 12, 1997
To parents recoiling from the discovery of lice on their child's scalp, the latest word from the medical front offers little comfort.Ordinary head lice may be turning into "super lice," developing immunity to over-the-counter treatments that are parents' chief weapon.The California Department of Health Services warned in a 1996 report that there is "circumstantial evidence" of increased head lice resistance. This could explain why some public health officials are seeing a sharp rise in lice outbreaks.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
Give credit to Denise Murphy, a Baltimore day-care provider and mother of three children. She courageously stepped forward and admitted this startling news: Children under her care had a problem with head lice last winter.That admission isn't really startling considering 8 million people, mostly children, bring home these wingless, bloodsucking, six-legged parasites each year.For those children -- and their parents -- head lice are an unpleasant fact of life. Yet there is still an undeniable stigma surrounding lice and paranoia about discussing it."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 21, 1999
Confirming the suspicions of many frustrated parents, Harvard University public health experts have proven that pesky head lice have grown resistant to chemical treatment.A new study shows about a 90 percent survival rate among a population of 209 lice plucked from the heads of U.S. kids and placed inside petri dishes containing the chemical permethrin, the active ingredient in Nix, the leading treatment for louse infestations.All children in the study had been treated previously with the chemical.
FEATURES
By Lesly Borge and Lesly Borge,Contributing Writer | October 4, 1998
Is there anything more annoying than finding out that you or your child has head lice? How about not finding a safe and effective treatment? Well, there may be an answer to your problems.What's being touted as the first electronic head-lice remover is now being sold in the United States. In Maryland, the Frederick County Health Department, Roland Park Country School and the Hebrew Academy of Greater Washington in Silver Springs are trying it.Robi Comb is a head lice treatment, using no pesticides, in the form of an electronic comb, introduced by ARR HealthTechnologies.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | September 24, 1991
Parents at George Cromwell Elementary in Ferndale want to know why.Why are head lice examinations being left up to parents?Why must students take chorus lessons on their own time?Why is so much time being spent preparing students for the Maryland SchoolPerformance Program?And couldn't money for that program be better used elsewhere?They hope to get some answers tonight. A Back toSchool forum set for 7 p.m. as a chance to meet teachers is evolvinginto a forum for parents' complaints.The school's Parent TeacherAssociation is collecting a petition asking those questions.
FEATURES
By Kristen Kridel | January 10, 2008
Lice salons: lousy idea or necessity? Perched in a hairdresser's chair, 9-year-old Grace Lasky raised her eyebrows as a woman slicked one of the salon's specialty products through her long, straight hair. No, Grace wasn't getting her hair styled in the swank Chicago boutique. The woman pulling a fine-toothed comb through the girl's hair was looking for nits, the eggs laid by lice and a recurring annoyance for the third-grader. "It sort of feels itchy," Grace said. Experts don't agree on the usefulness of delousing salons, but that hasn't stopped them from multiplying.
NEWS
By Regina Nuzzo and Regina Nuzzo,Los Angeles Times | December 22, 2006
In the war against head lice, we face an enemy that is fast and plentiful, with nimble armies that can evolve and outwit standard weaponry. Will we ever take the lead in this scalp-biting, nit-picking arms race? Recently, experts from around the world gathered in Buenos Aires, Argentina, to swap battle tactics at the Third International Congress on Phthiraptera, the group of 3,000 species of wingless parasitic insects that includes Pediculus capitis, bane of parents and school nurses across the land.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
After riding silently on our scalps for thousands of years, human head lice have finally begun to speak. Genetic evidence teased from the DNA of Pediculus humanus suggests that modern man caught one variety of the itchy pest during an encounter with one of our archaic cousins - possibly Homo erectus, who died out in Asia a short time later, at least 25,000 years ago. Scientists say the findings are the first evidence of direct contact between our own...
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | September 23, 2001
Q. I've had head lice for weeks and have tried RID, Nix and Vaseline to get rid of them. The lice disappear for about two days and then return. I'm single, so I do the best I can to remove the nits myself. Please help! How common is it to have resistant head lice? A. No one knows how prevalent resistant lice are, but a Harvard study showed that this is a real problem in some parts of the United States. For resistant lice, suffocation with Vaseline works, although the nits must still be removed.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 21, 1999
Confirming the suspicions of many frustrated parents, Harvard University public health experts have proven that pesky head lice have grown resistant to chemical treatment.A new study shows about a 90 percent survival rate among a population of 209 lice plucked from the heads of U.S. kids and placed inside petri dishes containing the chemical permethrin, the active ingredient in Nix, the leading treatment for louse infestations.All children in the study had been treated previously with the chemical.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun | August 8, 1999
Q. I am a medical student in London, now visiting the States on holiday. I read your column about head lice and want to suggest a possible solution. In between leaving secondary school and starting medical school, I worked for a year in a boys' boarding school in England. We had many "lice attacks" and found that the most effective way to eliminate them was to use a very fine lice comb with plenty of hair conditioner. Put the conditioner in the hair and then pull the comb through the hair, carefully cleaning it after each stroke.
FEATURES
By Lesly Borge and Lesly Borge,Contributing Writer | October 4, 1998
Is there anything more annoying than finding out that you or your child has head lice? How about not finding a safe and effective treatment? Well, there may be an answer to your problems.What's being touted as the first electronic head-lice remover is now being sold in the United States. In Maryland, the Frederick County Health Department, Roland Park Country School and the Hebrew Academy of Greater Washington in Silver Springs are trying it.Robi Comb is a head lice treatment, using no pesticides, in the form of an electronic comb, introduced by ARR HealthTechnologies.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2004
After riding silently on our scalps for thousands of years, human head lice have finally begun to speak. Genetic evidence teased from the DNA of Pediculus humanus suggests that modern man caught one variety of the itchy pest during an encounter with one of our archaic cousins - possibly Homo erectus, who died out in Asia a short time later, at least 25,000 years ago. Scientists say the findings are the first evidence of direct contact between our own...
NEWS
January 30, 1998
THE PROBLEM IS EVIDENT throughout the nation: Increasing numbers of students are being infested with six-legged lice and their rice-shaped eggs. They are becoming harder to kill, experts say. "It's the time of year for it," reports Donna Mullenax, nurse at Harman Elementary School, near Baltimore-Washington International Airport.Shirley Albert, nurse at Baltimore County's Riderwood Elementary, concurs: "Typically in the past, you would send the children home and they would come back free of lice.
NEWS
January 30, 1998
THE PROBLEM IS EVIDENT throughout the nation: Increasing numbers of students are being infested with six-legged lice and their rice-shaped eggs. They are becoming harder to kill, experts say. "It's the time of year for it," reports Donna Mullenax, nurse at Harman Elementary School, near Baltimore-Washington International Airport.Shirley Albert, nurse at Baltimore County's Riderwood Elementary, concurs: "Typically in the past, you would send the children home and they would come back free of lice.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1998
It's wintertime at Harman Elementary School, and the nurse knows it by the amount of nitpicking going on. Literally.In recent months, the heads of hundreds of Anne Arundel County students have been infested with six-legged lice and their rice-shaped eggs, called nits, which experts say have become harder to kill in the past year."
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