Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHead And Neck
IN THE NEWS

Head And Neck

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Police and the state medical examiner have determined that a Towson University student who died over the weekend fell into a glass door and suffered head and neck injuries that killed her. Julia Margaret Ratnaraj, 18, of Sewell, N.J., had been drinking before the incident, people who were with her at the time told police. Her death was an accident, police said Thursday. Shortly before midnight Saturday, police responded to a call for an overdose at an apartment in the 300 block of E. Joppa Road.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
Police and the state medical examiner have determined that a Towson University student who died over the weekend fell into a glass door and suffered head and neck injuries that killed her. Julia Margaret Ratnaraj, 18, of Sewell, N.J., had been drinking before the incident, people who were with her at the time told police. Her death was an accident, police said Thursday. Shortly before midnight Saturday, police responded to a call for an overdose at an apartment in the 300 block of E. Joppa Road.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | January 17, 2008
Joe Moffett wishes the spit test was available four years ago, before the tumor near the base of his tongue put him through months of radiation treatments, chemotherapy and surgery -- plus the hassle of taking nourishment through a feeding tube inserted at Johns Hopkins Hospital. "Having a test out there, I could have avoided a whole lot. But still, I thank the good Lord I'm alive, and I'm excited about this test. It could help a lot of people," said Moffett, 69, a retired Army pilot from Dillon, S.C. Researchers at Hopkins published findings this month showing they are close to developing a mouth rinse that can detect head and neck cancer such as Moffett's.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
ESPN analyst Mark Dixon has added sideline reporter and play-by-play caller to his list of titles. He patrolled the sideline of No. 5 Johns Hopkins' 15-6 rout of Siena on Friday and will provide analysis for the Moe's Southwest Grill Classic doubleheader in Jacksonville on Sunday involving No. 10 Denver against No. 18 Penn State and No. 15 Ohio State against Jacksonville. The former Blue Jays midfielder, who can be followed on Twitter at @DixonLacrosse, discussed his thoughts on the pace of play, Duke's loss to Denver and one team that's not getting enough attention.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2006
Still looking "groggy" at the Ravens' headquarters yesterday, Steve McNair is expected to recover from head and neck injuries by the time the Ravens return from their bye week. And when McNair suits up again, it will be as the Ravens' starting quarterback. Ravens@Saints Oct. 29, 1 p.m., Ch. 13, 1090 AM
NEWS
August 29, 1995
Man is charged in beating of wifeA Linthicum man was arrested Sunday and charged with battering his wife during an argument, county police said.A woman told police that her husband had thrown a television remote control at her and then punched her several times on the back of the head and the neck. The husband then pushed her into an oak banister and wall before she ran away and drove to the emergency room of North Arundel Hospital, police said.The woman was treated for a sprained right wrist and multiple bruises on her left arm, head and neck, police said.
NEWS
March 24, 2007
Two Baltimore men were each sentenced yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to 10 years in prison for conspiracy to commit first-degree murder for their roles in the 2005 killing of 35-year-old Antwon Torain. Farrakhan Jenkins, 22, of the 700 block of N. Payson St. and Tavon Coleman, 20, of the 500 block of N. Brice St. pleaded guilty Jan. 30, according to the Baltimore state's attorney's office. Prosecutors said that on Nov. 27, 2005, Torain had asked Jenkins, Coleman and Joshua Mills for help getting into his locked car on Payson Street.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2003
At times yesterday, Bridget Wallace seemed remorseful for embezzling nearly $200,000 from the American Head and Neck Society and betraying the trust of her supervisor, Dr. Wayne Koch. "I'd like to apologize to Dr. Koch, No. 1," Wallace said through tears in Baltimore Circuit Court before being sentenced. "It was very wrong. God knows it was just so wrong, and once I got into it, I just didn't know how to stop." Other times, she made excuses. "I have been a victim of financial difficulties since my father passed away over 24 years ago," said Wallace, 44, of the 500 block of Radnor Ave. in North Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | April 3, 2008
About 40,000 cases of oral cancer are diagnosed in the U.S. each year. Caught early, many oral cancers are considered by doctors to be curable. But the key is early diagnosis, says Dr. Christine G. Gourin, associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and director of the Clinical Research Program in Head and Neck Cancer. To help publicize the warning signs of this disease, the third week of this month has been named oral, head and neck cancer awareness week, she says.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | March 16, 1995
Three decades after a surgeon general's report linked smoking to human cancers, researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine have traced one of the genetic pathways by which tobacco does its harm.Scientists studying people with head and neck cancer found that tobacco damages a gene, known as p53, that works as a natural brake against a developing cancer. Without this repair mechanism, malignant cells can multiply and flourish into full-blown tumors.Although the mutation has been blamed for many cancers, the research by Dr. David Sidransky and colleagues at Hopkins is the first time the genetic defect has been tied specifically to tobacco smoke in a large number of human patients.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | November 21, 2012
I think Ted Cottrell , who ruled on Ed Reed's appeal yesterday, got it right when he overturned the original one-game suspension and instead handed out a $50,000 fine to the Ravens' safety. I watched all three hits that the NFL cited in punishing Reed and the only one that I thought was really blatant was the one on the New England Patriots' Deion Branch earlier this season. I'm not saying that he shouldn't have been penalized on the other two - the hit on Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Emmanuel Sanders Sunday night and the one on New Orleans Saints quarter Drew Brees in 2010 - but I just didn't think they were egregious enough to warrant contributing to a suspension.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
Dr. Duane Anthony Sewell, a highly regarded head and neck surgeon and researcher who was also a member of the faculty of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, died Nov. 26 of gastric cancer at his Mount Washington home. Dr. Sewell was 44. "I can't think of anybody who better exemplified what it means to be a physician than Duane Sewell. He combined excellent surgical and research skills, and making his patients extraordinarily comfortable," said Dr. Kevin Cullen, director of the University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | April 3, 2008
About 40,000 cases of oral cancer are diagnosed in the U.S. each year. Caught early, many oral cancers are considered by doctors to be curable. But the key is early diagnosis, says Dr. Christine G. Gourin, associate professor in the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and director of the Clinical Research Program in Head and Neck Cancer. To help publicize the warning signs of this disease, the third week of this month has been named oral, head and neck cancer awareness week, she says.
FEATURES
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | January 17, 2008
Joe Moffett wishes the spit test was available four years ago, before the tumor near the base of his tongue put him through months of radiation treatments, chemotherapy and surgery -- plus the hassle of taking nourishment through a feeding tube inserted at Johns Hopkins Hospital. "Having a test out there, I could have avoided a whole lot. But still, I thank the good Lord I'm alive, and I'm excited about this test. It could help a lot of people," said Moffett, 69, a retired Army pilot from Dillon, S.C. Researchers at Hopkins published findings this month showing they are close to developing a mouth rinse that can detect head and neck cancer such as Moffett's.
NEWS
March 24, 2007
Two Baltimore men were each sentenced yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court to 10 years in prison for conspiracy to commit first-degree murder for their roles in the 2005 killing of 35-year-old Antwon Torain. Farrakhan Jenkins, 22, of the 700 block of N. Payson St. and Tavon Coleman, 20, of the 500 block of N. Brice St. pleaded guilty Jan. 30, according to the Baltimore state's attorney's office. Prosecutors said that on Nov. 27, 2005, Torain had asked Jenkins, Coleman and Joshua Mills for help getting into his locked car on Payson Street.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2006
Still looking "groggy" at the Ravens' headquarters yesterday, Steve McNair is expected to recover from head and neck injuries by the time the Ravens return from their bye week. And when McNair suits up again, it will be as the Ravens' starting quarterback. Ravens@Saints Oct. 29, 1 p.m., Ch. 13, 1090 AM
NEWS
April 18, 2006
On Saturday April 15, 2006, LUCILLE E. (nee Heiland) of Reisterstown, beloved wife of the late John Howard Whittingham; devoted mother of Diana Lynn Martin and husband Drew; dear sister of William T. Heiland Jr., and wife Carolyn; dearest sister-in-law of Elsie Zimmerman, Olive and Samuel Gassaway and Dorothy Whittingham. Also survived by several nieces and a nephew and Sabine Liebenhenz. Friends may call at the Burrier-Queen Funeral Home & Crematory P.A., 1212 W. Old Liberty Rd., Winfield (beside South Carroll High School)
NEWS
May 17, 2006
On May 12, 2006, JONATHAN BRETT LODEN, 33, after a courageously fought two and a half year battle against head and neck cancer; cherished son of Timothy and Laurel; beloved brother of Bryan and sister-in-law, Erica; devoted uncle to niece, Brooke; loving grandson of Gloria Schuman and Gloria Loden. Also survived by many dear friends and other family members. Family will receive friends Tuesday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west beltway exit 14)
NEWS
May 17, 2006
On May 12, 2006, JONATHAN BRETT LODEN, 33, after a courageously fought two and a half year battle against head and neck cancer; cherished son of Timothy and Laurel; beloved brother of Bryan and sister-in-law, Erica; devoted uncle to niece, Brooke; loving grandson of Gloria Schuman and Gloria Loden. Also survived by many dear friends and other family members. Family will receive friends Tuesday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. at STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west beltway exit 14)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.