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NEWS
December 30, 1990
The race to perfect a new, high-definition television system, all but ceded to the Japanese and Europeans, is wide open again. Guess who broke into the front ranks? Americans. The people conventional wisdom keeps consigning to the back bench in the technology wars to define economic competitiveness for the 21st century.Japanese industrialists, confident of their consumer electronics dominance, rushed to develop high-definition television, or HDTV. Their version, now in early market tests, uses receivers costing as much as automobiles, but that's likely to change quickly -- as soon as TV producers begin taking advantage of HDTV's vastly improved picture quality.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | November 29, 2012
This year's Black Friday became the backdrop not only for doorbuster HDTV sales but for protests from retail workers across the country. Workers at Walmart, Target, even Macy's, have decried  unfair wages and conditions. So which retailers are the best employers? Job search engine Indeed.com has come out with a list of the top 15 companies to work for in retail. Indeed based the rankings on reviews posted by current and former employees on Indeed's company pages. Here they are: 1. Apple 2. Disney Store 3. Coach 4. Costco 5. IKEA 6. Dressbarn 7. Halloween City 8. Champs Sports 9. REI 10. Nike 11. Vitamin World 12. Nordstrom 13. Sherwin Williams 14. Finish Line 15. Bath & Body Works  
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BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 23, 2006
If you're shopping for technology this holiday season, you may have reason to celebrate. Sony has released the hot PlayStation 3 (although it's in short supply). Nintendo has introduced its Wii game console (with a nifty 3D controller), and Microsoft has released its Zune digital music player to compete with Apple's iPod. But the real excitement this year is in high-definition television. HDTV sets can produce far more detailed pictures on larger screens than standard TVs. Thanks to competition and better manufacturing, the price of HD has fallen far more quickly than anyone expected.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,Hartford Courant | February 17, 2009
If the U.S. Department of Agriculture graded all of the single-box speakers awaiting an HDTV partner, it would surely certify the Zvox lineup organic. Zvox's latest home-theater system, the Z-Base 550, forgoes highly processed sound, uses a cabinet built from medium-density fiberboard (real wood!) instead of plastic and, like a strict organic grower, avoids costly additives like HDMI video and digital audio connections. Then it says, go ahead, place any HDTV (with stand) on it - up to 47 inches - and you've got a television base/speaker, a compact faux-surround system with tonally accurate sound and an astounding lack of modern technological trickery.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | February 14, 2008
In the minutes of our retirement community town meeting, I find that the property management committee is concerned about our having to change to HDTV in 2009. I'm pretty sure I've read in your column that HDTV and digital TV are two different things. Am I correct? - Anne Townes All HDTV is digital, but not all digital is HDTV. Here's how to think of it. Draw a big circle and label it digital. Then draw a smaller circle inside it and label it HDTV. HDTV is a subset, a part, of digital TV. Digital just means the signal is sent out in the language of computers into tiny hunks of information that are assembled at the other end. That conversion to digital means cleaner signals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jerri Stroud and Jerri Stroud,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 15, 2004
High-definition television used to be only for the wealthy - or the particular - TV viewer. No longer. HDTV sets are selling for as little as $550 for a 27-inch model or about $1,500 for the lowest-priced big-screen model, an informal check of retailers showed. Some high-end models cost $9,000 to $15,000 each. And HD programming, once a rarity, is available from cable, satellite and broadcast sources. "It's coming into the family rooms and the great rooms," said Tony Vieira, general manager of the Sound Room in Chesterfield, Mo., which specializes in high-end audio and video equipment.
BUSINESS
By Edmund L. Andrews and Edmund L. Andrews,New York Times News Service | November 18, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The Federal Communications Commission announced last week that it would begin to test six rival high-definition television systems in April, but the competition has been thrown into turmoil.Stunned in June by the surprise entry of an all-digital system proposed by General Instrument Corp., a maker of signal-scrambling equipment, three of the leading rivals are rushing to overhaul their proposals in time to meet the agency's deadlines.The last-minute efforts mark a significant upheaval in the race to develop a technical standard for high-definition television, or HDTV.
FEATURES
By Kevin Hunt and Kevin Hunt,Hartford (Conn.) Courant | July 28, 2007
Now that you've bought a big-screen HDTV, it's time to protect your investment. Summer's villainous lightning, power outages and heat-wave electricity drain aren't the only threats to your delicate electronics. Even an air conditioner's compressor switching on can upset the electrical flow to the rest of the house, potentially damaging or straining home-entertainment equipment. Interference from microwave ovens, hair dryers and window air conditioners can be just as bad. When you drop $1,000 or more on an HDTV or surround-sound system, there's no excuse to leave it unprotected.
BUSINESS
By Mike Himowitz and Mike Himowitz,Sun Columnist | November 30, 2006
I've never run across a new technology that caused more confusion than HDTV. The consumer electronics industry took a simple entertainment device that most of us understand and turned it into a monster with enough specifications, whereases and wherefors to stump a convention of rocket scientists. Hoping to get folks started, last week I offered suggestions for picking the right size set and deciding which HDTV technology is best for you. This time we'll talk about specifications - the geekspeak you need to know to make the right choice.
NEWS
By Linda Shrieves and Linda Shrieves,THE ORLANDO SENTINEL | March 14, 2004
Oscar night wowed Americans as the stars paraded down the red carpet in low-cut gowns, shimmering jewels and perfectly coifed hair. But a small minority of TV viewers got a glimpse of the other side of Hollywood. Those watching the Oscar telecast in high-definition television spotted Renee Zellweger's blotchy red marks underneath her makeup. They examined Jamie Lee Curtis' crow's-feet. And they marveled at Michael Douglas, who looked positively ancient next to his glamorous wife, Catherine Zeta-Jones.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,Hartford Courant | December 16, 2008
What's a budget-class HDTV? With prices sinking almost as fast as the Dow, sometimes it's hard to tell. Sharp spares the consumer any confusion with its LC-52SB55U, part of an entry-level LCD series positioned below the company's slick Aquos line. The first giveaway, after the plastic-fantastic bezel, is the screen size-to-price ratio: It's a 52-incher, originally $2,200, now closer to $1,700 but spotted for $1,200 during the Black Friday frenzy. When it was introduced late this summer, the average 52-inch set cost closer to $3,500.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED | June 12, 2008
I have an old DVD/VCR combo. I use it a lot to record programs that I want to watch at my convenience. Also I have a large collection of purchased tapes. I know I will no longer be able to record more tapes. But ... will I be able to play the tapes I have? - Alice Roider Yes, the VCR will continue to be able to play all your tapes that it ever could play. I just got a new PC, and it came with Vista. Is there any way I can "upgrade" to XP? My printer and several software programs react badly, and I can hardly ever find anything.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2008
So you're sitting around, totally bored with the same old PC, bored with word processing, bored with spreadsheets, bored with Web browsing, bored with music, bored with news, bored with grainy YouTube videos. Then you realize it's Sunday night, and it strikes you: What you really want to do is watch Desperate Housewives. On your computer. In HD. Well, for a hundred bucks, you can satisfy that high-definition craving with the Pinnacle PCTV HD Pro Stick. Plug this nifty little gadget into a USB port on your computer, hook up an antenna or cable feed to the other end and you're in business - HDTV in a window on your desktop, or full-screen if you prefer.
BUSINESS
By BILL HUSTED and BILL HUSTED,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | March 13, 2008
I've been following your advice about HDTV and am almost ready to make the leap and buy a new set. I'd like to hang it on the wall in my living room. Is that the sort of job I could do for myself? - Eric Ulbricht It depends on your skills, but it's sure not as simple has hanging a picture. So let me go over some of the issues involved and you can decide if it's a DIY job. First, keep in mind that a flat screen is rather delicate. Flexing the set as you manhandle it onto the wall is not a good idea.
BUSINESS
By Bill Husted and Bill Husted,The Atlanta Journal-Constitution | February 14, 2008
In the minutes of our retirement community town meeting, I find that the property management committee is concerned about our having to change to HDTV in 2009. I'm pretty sure I've read in your column that HDTV and digital TV are two different things. Am I correct? - Anne Townes All HDTV is digital, but not all digital is HDTV. Here's how to think of it. Draw a big circle and label it digital. Then draw a smaller circle inside it and label it HDTV. HDTV is a subset, a part, of digital TV. Digital just means the signal is sent out in the language of computers into tiny hunks of information that are assembled at the other end. That conversion to digital means cleaner signals.
FEATURES
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | December 4, 2007
Yolanda Vazquez watched a news broadcast on a high-definition television for the first time with mixed emotions. She was impressed by the way it rendered the anchors in such vivid detail. "It's amazing," she said, "like you're not in 3-D, but in 15-D." But awe gave way to self-conscious jitters once Vazquez, a reporter and anchor at Maryland Public Television, realized that her turn in front of an HD camera was coming. "You're really under the microscope," she said, "and if you've got a new pimple or a stray hair, it's obvious."
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL JAMES and MICHAEL JAMES,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2000
What if America had to throw out its TV sets -- all 250 million of them? It sounds farfetched but something like that could happen unless the federal government, broadcasters and television makers develop a master plan to move the country from the current broadcast system to a new one that provides High Definition Television signals. By law, the changeover is supposed to happen in 2006, when TV stations are to replace their current broadcasts and UHF frequencies they use now to the government.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2001
High Definition Television has a rocky path ahead of it before becoming a permanent fixture in the American living room, but you've got to give it some credit. It simply looks spectacular. Legislators, broadcasters, and budget-conscious consumers occasionally are blocking the road to HDTV's success, and many of them have legitimate concerns. Many television stations, for instance, feel the time isn't right for broadcast of HDTV signals because only a tiny percentage of American families have plopped down $3,000 or more for an HDTV system.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 8, 2007
From the questions I get this time of year, I can often tell what gadgets are going to be big sellers over the holidays. The winner in 2007 looks like HDTV, and with good reason. Prices of high-definition sets may not be in free fall, as they were a year ago, but they're still dropping. Lots of high-quality models in the 42-inch range are available for $1,000 or less. If retailers get really antsy about the economy, Black Friday sales could drive prices lower. That said, here are answers to the most frequent questions I get. What kind of HDTV should I buy?
FEATURES
By Kevin Hunt and Kevin Hunt,Hartford (Conn.) Courant | July 28, 2007
Now that you've bought a big-screen HDTV, it's time to protect your investment. Summer's villainous lightning, power outages and heat-wave electricity drain aren't the only threats to your delicate electronics. Even an air conditioner's compressor switching on can upset the electrical flow to the rest of the house, potentially damaging or straining home-entertainment equipment. Interference from microwave ovens, hair dryers and window air conditioners can be just as bad. When you drop $1,000 or more on an HDTV or surround-sound system, there's no excuse to leave it unprotected.
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