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By The Boston Globe | April 12, 2007
More than 600 new radio stations have come to America's airwaves in the past three years - and you probably haven't noticed. Fewer than a half-million Americans use a new technology called HD radio, which was invented by a Maryland company. It gives listeners a host of new options. But that may soon change, as HD radio sets are getting cheaper and broadcasters are launching an all-out campaign to draw listeners. "We're in the early stages of a major technological transition," said Robert J. Struble, president and chief executive of Ibiquity Digital Corp.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
CBS radio will launch a country music station in Baltimore at noon Friday, management announced today. The station, called New Country, will air at 106.1 FM on the dial. This is the second station in the market that CBS is now programming through an arrangement with Hope Christian, a religious programmer that holds the broadcasting license. In August 2011, CBS started programming 97.5 FM under the same kind of arrangement. WPOC (93.1 FM), with Laurie DeYoung, is the Baltimore station that has enjoyed much success with country music for a long time.
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BUSINESS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
The Federal Communications Commission gave its blessing yesterday to a digital radio technology for local broadcasters that promises highly improved sound for consumers and new revenue streams for broadcasters. The approval was welcome news for Columbia-based iBiquity Digital Radio Corp., which created the technology that allows broadcasters to transmit digital and analog signals simultaneously. Pending the release of the FCC's order, which could occur as early as today, broadcasters who have ordered and installed the digital equipment could begin broadcasting digitally next week, but iBiquity had planned for broadcasters in six markets to begin using the technology later in the fall.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,Hartford Courant | November 11, 2008
Welcome to the real world, HD Radio. Extra programming and the no-hiss digital transmission haven't persuaded enough people to pay premium prices, sometimes $400 or more, for a new HD Radio receiver. But now HD Radio prices are starting to look like good old analog-radio prices. Coby, whose low-cost MP3 players and portable DVD players dangle from drugstore displays, is the unlikely source of the first portable HD radio receiver, the shockingly good HDR-700 ($149), and the brushed-aluminum HDR-650 ($99)
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | January 10, 2008
To a tech lover, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is sort of like a four-day long Christmas morning - but better. Thousands of exhibitors trot out their biggest and best in new technology toys, promising a year full of product releases, and possible pipe dreams - from 150-inch TVs to driverless cars. And Maryland's small delegation (17 local organizations and companies were there in all) held its own on the coolness factor, with Hunt Valley-based TESSCO Technologies' diamond-encrusted iPhone case and Towson University's role in making radio accessible to hearing-impaired people.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 4, 2008
New technology that will allow for closed-captioning of radio broadcasts for the deaf and hard-of-hearing will get an election night tryout at Towson University tonight. About 50 invited guests will be able to read National Public Radio's election-night broadcast during the demonstration, which will take place in a room at Johnny Unitas Stadium on the Towson campus. Their comments and suggestions will be used to fine-tune the technology, which will allow people with HD Radios to read broadcasts within moments of being aired.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2004
In what's been described as the biggest leap for radio since the introduction of FM, the first high-definition radio receivers going on sale this week will bring listeners CD-quality sound and on-demand weather, traffic and news. Kenwood USA sold its first black box digital receiver Monday in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where KZIA-FM Z102.9 radio station broadcasts digitally. Several manufacturers from Delphi to Panasonic are unveiling new HD radio receivers - some of which will go on sale this year - at this week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2007
Now they want you to replace your radios. The consumer electronics and broadcasting industries - the same types pushing us to replace our trusty analog TVs with whizz-bang digital sets before all broadcasts go digital in 2009 - are busy deploying a new radio technology called "HD Digital." The cheapest new digital receiver will set you back at least a hundred bucks, and better ones go for $200 to $600. But they're more than worth it, advocates say. "As far as radio broadcasting goes, I think this is the most significant advance since [Edwin]
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
CBS radio will launch a country music station in Baltimore at noon Friday, management announced today. The station, called New Country, will air at 106.1 FM on the dial. This is the second station in the market that CBS is now programming through an arrangement with Hope Christian, a religious programmer that holds the broadcasting license. In August 2011, CBS started programming 97.5 FM under the same kind of arrangement. WPOC (93.1 FM), with Laurie DeYoung, is the Baltimore station that has enjoyed much success with country music for a long time.
NEWS
By KEVIN HUNT and KEVIN HUNT,Hartford Courant | November 11, 2008
Welcome to the real world, HD Radio. Extra programming and the no-hiss digital transmission haven't persuaded enough people to pay premium prices, sometimes $400 or more, for a new HD Radio receiver. But now HD Radio prices are starting to look like good old analog-radio prices. Coby, whose low-cost MP3 players and portable DVD players dangle from drugstore displays, is the unlikely source of the first portable HD radio receiver, the shockingly good HDR-700 ($149), and the brushed-aluminum HDR-650 ($99)
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | November 4, 2008
New technology that will allow for closed-captioning of radio broadcasts for the deaf and hard-of-hearing will get an election night tryout at Towson University tonight. About 50 invited guests will be able to read National Public Radio's election-night broadcast during the demonstration, which will take place in a room at Johnny Unitas Stadium on the Towson campus. Their comments and suggestions will be used to fine-tune the technology, which will allow people with HD Radios to read broadcasts within moments of being aired.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | January 10, 2008
To a tech lover, the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas is sort of like a four-day long Christmas morning - but better. Thousands of exhibitors trot out their biggest and best in new technology toys, promising a year full of product releases, and possible pipe dreams - from 150-inch TVs to driverless cars. And Maryland's small delegation (17 local organizations and companies were there in all) held its own on the coolness factor, with Hunt Valley-based TESSCO Technologies' diamond-encrusted iPhone case and Towson University's role in making radio accessible to hearing-impaired people.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2007
Now they want you to replace your radios. The consumer electronics and broadcasting industries - the same types pushing us to replace our trusty analog TVs with whizz-bang digital sets before all broadcasts go digital in 2009 - are busy deploying a new radio technology called "HD Digital." The cheapest new digital receiver will set you back at least a hundred bucks, and better ones go for $200 to $600. But they're more than worth it, advocates say. "As far as radio broadcasting goes, I think this is the most significant advance since [Edwin]
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | April 12, 2007
More than 600 new radio stations have come to America's airwaves in the past three years - and you probably haven't noticed. Fewer than a half-million Americans use a new technology called HD radio, which was invented by a Maryland company. It gives listeners a host of new options. But that may soon change, as HD radio sets are getting cheaper and broadcasters are launching an all-out campaign to draw listeners. "We're in the early stages of a major technological transition," said Robert J. Struble, president and chief executive of Ibiquity Digital Corp.
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2004
In what's been described as the biggest leap for radio since the introduction of FM, the first high-definition radio receivers going on sale this week will bring listeners CD-quality sound and on-demand weather, traffic and news. Kenwood USA sold its first black box digital receiver Monday in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, where KZIA-FM Z102.9 radio station broadcasts digitally. Several manufacturers from Delphi to Panasonic are unveiling new HD radio receivers - some of which will go on sale this year - at this week's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas.
BUSINESS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2002
The Federal Communications Commission gave its blessing yesterday to a digital radio technology for local broadcasters that promises highly improved sound for consumers and new revenue streams for broadcasters. The approval was welcome news for Columbia-based iBiquity Digital Radio Corp., which created the technology that allows broadcasters to transmit digital and analog signals simultaneously. Pending the release of the FCC's order, which could occur as early as today, broadcasters who have ordered and installed the digital equipment could begin broadcasting digitally next week, but iBiquity had planned for broadcasters in six markets to begin using the technology later in the fall.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | September 2, 2008
More stations, playing different kinds of music, with better sound. HD Radio, offering all those features, sounded like a natural. But five years after its introduction, digital radio, even with all its technological bells and whistles, is still struggling to gain a foothold in the American marketplace. "We're where we'd like to be, but we'd like to make it go quicker," says Bob Struble, president and chief executive officer of Columbia-based Ibiquity Digital, which developed and licenses the HD Radio technology.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christopher Boyd and Christopher Boyd,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 26, 2004
Sofyan Alif fiddled with the buttons of a colorful car stereo at Circuit City recently, doing research for his next big purchase. The recent high school graduate wants a radio packed with features. He's flexible, with one exception: It must be ready to receive digital satellite radio. "About 75 percent of my friends have satellite sets," Alif said. "No matter what you want to listen to, you can find it. And there aren't any of those stupid commercials to interrupt the music." Satellite radio's audience is mushrooming.
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