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By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | June 8, 1994
In one of the biggest pollution penalties ever levied in Maryland, a New Jersey-based company was fined $120,000 yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court for illegally disposing of hazardous waste in the Curtis Bay area.Harris Structural Steel Co. Inc. of Piscataway, N.J., pleaded guilty to two counts of illegal transportation and disposal of hazardous waste. Maryland State police had seized 21 drums during a 1992 raid at the company's truck terminal near Benhill Road and Curtis Avenue.Acting on an anonymous tip, state police assigned to the attorney general's Environmental Crimes Unit saw a tractor-trailer arrive and dump a load of wood chips and drums.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Thomas D. McKewen, a materials recovery and waste management expert who was the founding director of Maryland Environmental Service, died June 13 of congestive heart failure at his home in Ashburn, Va. The former Towson resident was 86. "I had been hearing that he was a person with a lot of ability and had an understanding of the environmental work we were doing," said former Gov. Marvin J. Mandel, who appointed Mr. McKewen as director of the...
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FEATURES
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
A Baltimore man was sentenced to 18 months in jail after pleading guilty Monday in circuit court to illegally dumping hazardous waste in an empty city lot, Attorney General Douglas Gansler said. Richard Kevin Fox Jr., 40, admitted that a year ago he hauled two, 55-gallon drums filled with wastewater from a brick-washing job to a lot in the 1800 block of S. Monroe St. and left them. A city code enforcement investigator was able to trace the truck back to Fox, who admitted he accepted money from a contractor to dispose of the drums.
NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Baltimore City's Household Hazardous Waste collection events begin April 4 and will continue every month on the first Friday and immediately following Saturday through October, Public Works Director Rudolph S. Chow announced Monday. City residents can dispose of hazardous household materials, such as pesticides, herbicides, car and household batteries, drain cleaners, oil-based paint and gasoline, according to a department of public works press release. Asbestos, ammunition, fire extinguishers, industrial and medical wastes and radioactive materials will not be accepted.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Two companies have agreed to pay a $5,000 penalty for hazardous-waste violations at an East Baltimore metal plating facility, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Wednesday. EPA cited American Plating Service, Inc., which operates the business in the 4000 block of East Monument St., and Monument Street Properties LLC, which owns the site. Alleged violations included improper storage and failure to provide and document worker training. Among the wastes at issue were electroplating sludges, a liquid containing cyanide and ignitable residues, according to EPA. The companies agreed to take corrective actions, the agency said, including monitoring for any hazardous release from the facility.
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From The Aegis | May 8, 2012
The Local Emergency Planning Committee, in cooperation with Harford County Office of Recycling, is offering Harford County residents the opportunity to safely dispose of their household hazardous waste products such as oil-based paints, cleaning products, bleach, pool chemicals, herbicides, pesticides and mercury thermometers The hazardous waste collection will be Saturday, May 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Harford Waste Disposal Center Mulch...
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
Household hazardous waste drop off for Baltimore residents resumed this weekend, after a winter hiatus. Oil-based paints, pesticides and herbicides, batteries, pool chemicals, drain cleaners and gasoline, among other hazardous materials, can be taken to the Department of Public Works' Northwest Citizens' Convenience Center, at 2840 Sisson St., on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The facility was also open Friday during the same hours for hazardous...
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2011
Baltimore officials are considering ways to continue to offer household hazardous waste collection after some people waited in their idling cars for more than an hour to drop off items such as oil-based paint, antifreeze and oven cleaner on Saturday. About 1,800 vehicles passed through the collection site at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute within six hours, according to the city Department of Public Works — three times the highest level from previous events. The DPW used to offer two-day hazardous waste collection events twice a year, but held none last year.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
Gail Pickering of Baltimore put some gasoline aside last winter when her snow plow broke down. Months later she tried giving it away but found out it was too old to use. Pickering finally parted with the petrol on Saturday, dropping it off at the city Department of Public Works household hazardous waste drop-0ff at Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. The event began around 8:30 and by about three hours later more than 220 cars had lined up to drop off such items as household cleaners, automobile oils and wood treatments.
NEWS
October 18, 1993
Superfund has been a superfailure in 13 years of trying to clean up the nation's toxic legacy from decades of criminal and negligent disposal of hazardous waste.Some $15 billion has been spent on Superfund projects, but only about 100 polluted sites out of 1,300 on the list have actually been treated or cleaned up. Most of the cleaning up has been done by lawyers and administrators, who have taken three-quarters of the money spent.While steadfastly insisting that "the polluter pays," Superfund has never had the resources or the personnel to collect from every polluter.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Two companies have agreed to pay a $5,000 penalty for hazardous-waste violations at an East Baltimore metal plating facility, the Environmental Protection Agency announced Wednesday. EPA cited American Plating Service, Inc., which operates the business in the 4000 block of East Monument St., and Monument Street Properties LLC, which owns the site. Alleged violations included improper storage and failure to provide and document worker training. Among the wastes at issue were electroplating sludges, a liquid containing cyanide and ignitable residues, according to EPA. The companies agreed to take corrective actions, the agency said, including monitoring for any hazardous release from the facility.
FEATURES
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
A Baltimore man was sentenced to 18 months in jail after pleading guilty Monday in circuit court to illegally dumping hazardous waste in an empty city lot, Attorney General Douglas Gansler said. Richard Kevin Fox Jr., 40, admitted that a year ago he hauled two, 55-gallon drums filled with wastewater from a brick-washing job to a lot in the 1800 block of S. Monroe St. and left them. A city code enforcement investigator was able to trace the truck back to Fox, who admitted he accepted money from a contractor to dispose of the drums.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 23, 2013
Coming early next month will be a chance for Harford County residents to get rid of certain hazardous household products that they may not have figured out how to get rid of safely. On Saturday, May 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., the Local Emergency Planning Committee, in cooperation with Harford County Office of Recycling, is offering Harford County residents the opportunity to safely dispose of their household hazardous waste products, such as oil-based paints, cleaning products, bleach, pool chemicals, herbicides, pesticides and mercury thermometers.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Baltimore County residents can get rid of hazardous household materials at a collection event in Halethorpe on Sunday. The event is scheduled for 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Western Acceptance Facility at 3310 Transway Road. Acceptable items include: household paints; lawn, garden, household and swimming pool chemicals; automotive fluids; cleaning solvents; rechargeable batteries; medicines; mercury thermometers and thermostats; fluorescent light bulbs; fireworks and ammunition. Trash will not be accepted.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2012
The owner of a Laurel dry-cleaning business has pleaded guilty to improperly disposing of cleaning solvents near Millersville, Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler announced Friday. Mehret Sium, owner of Discount Dry Cleaners LLLC, entered guilty pleas Aug. 31 in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to charges of illegal disposal of hazardous wastes and failure to follow hazardous-waste transportation requirements, according to court records. The case stems from a tip received in March, when the Maryland Department of the Environment's hazardous response team found 18 drums of dry cleaning solvent waste on the side of Dicus Mill Road in Anne Arundel County.
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From The Aegis | May 8, 2012
The Local Emergency Planning Committee, in cooperation with Harford County Office of Recycling, is offering Harford County residents the opportunity to safely dispose of their household hazardous waste products such as oil-based paints, cleaning products, bleach, pool chemicals, herbicides, pesticides and mercury thermometers The hazardous waste collection will be Saturday, May 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Harford Waste Disposal Center Mulch...
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,Sun Reporter | April 27, 2007
Baltimore residents can get rid of hazardous waste this weekend at the Polytechnic Institute parking lot. The drop-off will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Residents can get rid of items including bleach, pesticides, herbicides, car and household batteries, propane tanks, drain cleaner, gasoline and pool chemicals. Polytechnic Institute is at 1400 W. Cold Spring Lane. Proof of city residency, which could be a driver's license or telephone or tax bill, is required.
BUSINESS
By Grant Ferrier | February 25, 1991
Profit margins can be skinny, costs steep, paperwork a headache and liabilities hair-raising. Yet the highly fragmented and volatile market for hazardous waste transportation has attracted players of all sizes and from at least four industries.Those determined to stay in business for the long haul are pursuing a variety of strategies to compete for the 10 million tons of hazardous waste shipped off site each year. Some will have a harder road to travel than others.Perhaps the biggest challenges face commercial carriers, the myriad transportation companies that have either chosen to haul hazardous waste exclusively or more often as an adjunct to other freight.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
Household hazardous waste drop off for Baltimore residents resumed this weekend, after a winter hiatus. Oil-based paints, pesticides and herbicides, batteries, pool chemicals, drain cleaners and gasoline, among other hazardous materials, can be taken to the Department of Public Works' Northwest Citizens' Convenience Center, at 2840 Sisson St., on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The facility was also open Friday during the same hours for hazardous...
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
Baltimore city residents' next opportunity to leave household hazardous waste at the Northwest Citizen Convenience Center on Sisson Street will come between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Dec. 2 and 3. The center's regular dropoff days would have been held the last Friday and Saturday of November, but that event was postponed because of a mandatory furlough day for city employees on Nov. 25. The center, at 2840 Sisson St. in Remington, will accept hazardous...
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