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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
Buzz Melton squinted across a South Baltimore field and liked what he saw: twisted metal, oozing chemicals, 20 moaning accident victims."The only thing we're missing are famine and locusts," Melton said with gusto.Yesterday morning, more than 200 of the region's fire, police and emergency medical workers tested their skills against Melton, the master of disaster, in their 13th annual hazardous materials drill.When it was over, Melton again liked what he saw."There are some places for improvement, but overall we're tickled with the results," said the senior environmental engineer for agricultural products manufacturer FMC Corp.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2013
Service on the Camden line will be disrupted Monday, MARC officials said, after a CSX freight train partially derailed in Southwest Baltimore on Sunday morning. Crews have cleared one of the tracks and the Camden line will be on a full service schedule with 15- to 30-minute delays, said Terry Owens, a Maryland Transit Administration spokesman. Passengers are encouraged to take the Penn line if they wish to avoid delays, and a shuttle will be available to take Camden line passengers to the Penn line.
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NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
Baltimore County police and fire crews responded Monday to a report of potentially hazardous materials in a rowhouse in the Parkville-Hillendale area. Officer Shawn Vinson, a spokesman for the police department, said that shortly after 5 p.m. officers began investigating a 911 report of a strong odor coming from the basement of a residence in the 8300 block of Ridgely Oak Road. Vinson said the county's bomb squad was called to the scene as a precaution. The incident was largely concluded by 8:30 p.m., with no one injured and no property damaged, according to Vinson and Capt.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
As smoke rose above Rosedale homes hours after a CSX train derailed and exploded May 28, many residents wondered what exactly was burning. Three of the railcars were transporting hazardous materials, and investigators believe it was sodium chlorate that exploded. Hazardous materials pass through American neighborhoods each day by train, and some advocates have been pushing for years to make it easier for people to know what those cars are carrying - and what effect they could have in a catastrophic accident.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2010
Consolidated Pharmaceutical Group and its owner agreed Monday to pay $250,000 in fines, never again own a business in Maryland and sell its long-dormant Brooklyn Park penicillin-making site as part of a plea to criminal charges stemming from abandoning the plant, where officials said acids and toxic chemicals were leaking. When the company ceased production in 1999, it "shut the door and just left," said Michelle Barnes, an assistant attorney general. But the plant still held more than 50,000 gallons of hazardous chemicals, including some that, under certain conditions, could have combined into deadly cyanide gas, she said, adding that "the danger to the community was significant."
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1995
Carroll County's Local Emergency Planning Committee is cataloging the locations of all hazardous materials stored in the county, including pesticides and other farm chemicals, on a new computer at the Emergency Operations Center, officials said yesterday.The information would be dispatched to emergency crews that respond to fires or hazardous materials incidents to alert them of danger before they arrive at a scene, committee members told Commissioner Richard T. Yates yesterday.Many of the hazardous materials locations have been listed with various county fire companies.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown | October 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives voted yesterday to require railroads to inform local authorities of the hazardous materials they carry through tunnels and to give them information about entrances and exits in case of emergency. Part of the Federal Railroad Safety Improvement Act of 2007, the requirements were written by Rep. Elijah E. Cummings in response to a 2001 fire caused by the derailment of a train carrying flammable liquid through a Baltimore tunnel. "The Howard Street Tunnel fire was a catastrophic eye-opener to the need for a safety overhaul of our nation's railway systems, particularly where tunnels and bridges are concerned," said the Baltimore Democrat, a member of the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | August 26, 1993
Carroll County will receive $7,578 in grants under the Hazardous Materials Transportation Uniform Safety Act for the training of hazardous materials technicians, firefighters and medic crews, it was announced this week.The county got most of the $9,200 it had requested to train hazardous materials teams to handle incidents such as two that occurred in Westminster on Friday.The grant was announced at the regular meeting of the Local Emergency Planning Committee on Monday by Chairman George Thomas.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | December 29, 1992
The Carroll County commissioners want more information before they will sign a grant request for materials and personnel for a group working to develop a hazardous-material response ++ unit in Carroll.The Local Emergency Planning Committee, which wants the money to purchase a computer and software and to hire a data-entry operator, needs the commissioners' approval to submit the $21,000 request to the state.This $21,000 is in addition to $5,000 already requested for the project by the county Emergency Operations Center in that agency's fiscal 1994 operating budget.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | August 26, 1994
Investigators from the Environmental Protection Agency, Maryland Department of the Environment and the attorney general's office yesterday combed an Anne Arundel highway construction site looking for hazardous materials that may be buried there.As of late yesterday, the search at the intersection of U.S. 50 and Interstate 97 just north of Annapolis had uncovered two 55-gallon barrels -- one containing a "grease-like" substance, said Liz Kalinowski, a spokeswoman for the State Highway Administration.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Just before midnight Wednesday, three words brought a stream of emergency crews and hazardous materials units to a wooded corner of Cecil County just north of Interstate 95: liquid sulfuric acid. A train operated by CSX Corp. derailed about 11:45 p.m., and initial reports said two cars contained the highly corrosive and environmentally dangerous substance. Luckily, officials said, the acid didn't leak, even though the cars containing it were off-kilter. "They were either sideways or just off the rail, but none are on their side," said CSX spokesman Bob Sullivan of the nine cars determined to have slipped off the tracks.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2012
Both spans of the Bay Bridge were closed for nearly two hours Tuesday during afternoon rush hour after a propane truck began leaking its contents on the westbound approach on Kent Island. Eastbound traffic backed up to St. Margarent's Road and westbound traffic was stalled as far east as Kent Narrows while emergency crews dealt with the situation. At one point, Maryland Transportation Authority officials urged motorists to seek alternate routes, including Delaware roads. The MdTA closed the bridges about 3:20 p.m., when a white tanker truck began venting a plume of white smoke near the intersection of westbound U.S. 50 and Route 8 in Stevensville.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | September 27, 2012
A hazardous materials crew was called to clean up a spill of automotive fluids into a small stream following a single vehicle accident north of Rocks State Park in northern Harford County Wednesday afternoon. A Honda Accord traveling north ran off Route 24 a few hundred feet north of Coen Road, flipping over and landing in the stream around 3:38 p.m., according to Rich Gardiner, a spokesman for the Harford Volunteer Fire & EMS Association. The driver, whose name and age were unavailable, was taken by ambulance to a regional trauma center, Gardiner said.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2012
Baltimore County police and fire crews responded Monday to a report of potentially hazardous materials in a rowhouse in the Parkville-Hillendale area. Officer Shawn Vinson, a spokesman for the police department, said that shortly after 5 p.m. officers began investigating a 911 report of a strong odor coming from the basement of a residence in the 8300 block of Ridgely Oak Road. Vinson said the county's bomb squad was called to the scene as a precaution. The incident was largely concluded by 8:30 p.m., with no one injured and no property damaged, according to Vinson and Capt.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Two people have died following the derailment of a CSX train carrying coal and traveling through Ellicott City around midnight Monday. The victims' identities have not been released as of 7 a.m. Tuesday. Frederick Road, which becomes Main Street in Ellicott City, was closed to traffic from Old Columbia Pike to Oella Avenue as a result of the accident. According to the Howard County police department, police and fire department crews received a report around midnight Tuesday that an eastbound CSX train had gone off the tracks.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
Household hazardous waste drop off for Baltimore residents resumed this weekend, after a winter hiatus. Oil-based paints, pesticides and herbicides, batteries, pool chemicals, drain cleaners and gasoline, among other hazardous materials, can be taken to the Department of Public Works' Northwest Citizens' Convenience Center, at 2840 Sisson St., on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The facility was also open Friday during the same hours for hazardous...
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
The chairman of the county's Local Emergency Planning Committee told the county commissioners yesterday that Carroll needs training and equipment for "first responders" to emergency hazardous materials calls.Chairman Mike Rehfeld cited the recent Lehigh Cement incident in Union Bridge in which six employees were overcome by fumes and the leaking of benzene fumes into the basement of a Manchester home as he asked the commissioners for money to accomplish the committee's planning and training goals.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
State prosecutors have begun a criminal investigation into possible environmental violations at a South Baltimore warehouse, after finding what is believed to be hazardous materials illegally stored at the site, authorities said yesterday. The investigation by the attorney general's environmental crimes unit began last week after residents complained that the warehouse owner had paid neighborhood children and young adults $10 to $60 a day to clean trash and chemical drums from the warehouse at 1700 Clarkson St. Inside the building, city and state investigators found liquids eating through unmarked metal barrels, oozing onto the floor and out a warehouse door, said Eric Augustus Banks, a compliance officer with the city Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho and Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
A woman poured bleach and Pine-Sol on a Walmart customer in southern Baltimore County, police said, in an incident that closed down the store for several hours Saturday and sent 19 to area hospitals. The suspect, Theresa Monique Jefferson, 33, followed another woman into the store and assaulted her, county police spokesman Shawn Vinson said in an email. She later turned herself in and was arrested. The two women knew each other and were involved in a continuing dispute, Vinson said.
NEWS
August 8, 2010
This time we got lucky. This time, when train cars carrying hazardous materials went off the tracks in the Howard Street tunnel Thursday morning, there was no leak — unlike the similar accident in 2001, when cars leaked materials including fluorosilicic acid. Back in 2001, CSX said it was not responsible for the Howard Street tunnel accident. The railroad blamed the city, saying a water main leak caused the derailment and the subsequent fire that burned in the tunnel for days.
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