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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | December 18, 1994
The Maryland attorney general is investigating whether a Severn manufacturing company has illegally dumped or stored hazardous waste.The target of the probe that began just before Thanksgiving is Powercon Corp., which makes and exports industrial electrical switches."I can confirm that there is an investigation going on," said Elizabeth B. Volz, supervising attorney of the attorney general's environmental crimes unit. "We have had some allegations about some hazardous waste there."Investigators with the Maryland Department of the Environment have been at the site.
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NEWS
By Linda Burkins and For The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
In roller derby, a name says it all. The Hazard County Hellions, Harford County's only roller derby team, chose a name that seems wild and mischievous, a stark contrast to the responsible citizens who form the team. In this sport, theatrics are just as much a part of a match as athletics, and its players, no matter how shy or timid they seem by day, take on sassy, aggressive alter egos when they lace up their skates. Formed in 2013, the co-ed team is part of MADE (Modern Athletic Derby Endeavor)
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NEWS
April 16, 2003
Baltimore County will hold its spring Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday in the parking lot at the Maryland State Fairgrounds on York Road. Residents also can dispose of the materials at Eastern Sanitary Landfill, 6529 Days Cove Road in White Marsh, from April through October. The landfill is open from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Information: 410-887-3745.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Thomas D. McKewen, a materials recovery and waste management expert who was the founding director of Maryland Environmental Service, died June 13 of congestive heart failure at his home in Ashburn, Va. The former Towson resident was 86. "I had been hearing that he was a person with a lot of ability and had an understanding of the environmental work we were doing," said former Gov. Marvin J. Mandel, who appointed Mr. McKewen as director of the...
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1994
U.S. Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, 1st District Republican, will meet with a representative of the federal Environmental Protection Agency tomorrow to discuss hazardous materials management at Fort Meade.Mr. Gilchrest learned of what is happening at Fort Meade after being alerted by his constituents, said Kathy Hicks, who manages the congressman's Glen Burnie office.Last week, the Maryland Department of the Environment imposed a $10,000 fine on the military for improper hazardous waste management.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Kerry O'Rourke and Anne Haddad and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writers | February 3, 1991
While area residents await the state's decision on whether Lehigh Portland Cement Co. may burn waste carbon in its kilns, the company is applying for yet another permit.This one is for burning hazardouswaste solvents. Officials from the plant and the Maryland Departmentof the Environment say the materials may not be hazardous after theyare burned, depending on the particular substances.The company will save money by burning waste fuels and says that the high temperature of cement kilns -- about twice that of a regularincinerator -- makes them ideal for burning some kinds of waste as cleanly as they can be burned.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | July 1, 1991
Federal environmental agents today will begin cleaning up 44 drums of hazardous waste stashed away on a Brooklyn Park storage site.The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency declared the 14-acre dump on property owned by Drumco Inc. a "fire hazard" and a potential health threat in announcing the cleanup Friday.The action, under the EPA's Superfund program, comes less than a week after the site's owner was sentenced to jail for violating Maryland environmental laws. George Phillips Garratt III, a Carroll Countyresident who owns the steel drum recycling company, received a 90-day sentence for illegally dumping the barrels of waste in a trailer.
NEWS
April 22, 1994
County residents can get rid of chemicals or other hazardous materials they found during spring cleaning during the hazardous waste drop-off day tomorrow.Waste products, which should be in their original containers for easy identification, will be accepted from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Department of Public Works building on Harry S. Truman Parkway in Parole, or the Fire Department Headquarters on Veterans Highway in Millersville.Officials said to be prepared for a 15-minute wait. They will check your driver's license to verify that you are a county resident.
NEWS
February 16, 1993
New Windsor resident Linda Cunfer has been appointed to the state Controlled Hazardous Substances Task Force, which will develop a strategy for reduction, treatment, reuse and disposal of hazardous waste.Ms. Cunfer is board chairwoman of the New Windsor Community Action Project and a full-time political science student at Western Maryland College."Dealing with the growing problem of toxic and hazardous waste is a key element in a statewide waste management strategy," she said.Others on the 23-member board include government officials, representatives from the cement, manufacturing and incineration industries, researchers, and experts in environmental health.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | April 24, 1992
The Safety-Kleen Corp. apparently picked a bad time to propose building a hazardous-waste transfer facility in Odenton.With the possibility that nearby Millersville Landfill was leaking hazardous chemicals into well water, residents were not about to welcome more waste stored in their community.At a hearing Wednesday night, the people aimed their anger not just at company representatives, but at state and county officials who,they said, can't be trusted to regulate the industries."We are all on wells, not city water," Anna Deinlein, who lives a few hundred feet from the Mayfield Industrial Park, said Wednesday at a Maryland Department of the Environment hearing.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | May 18, 2014
The Maryland Natural Resources Police has issued a warning to boaters and anglers to avoid the Upper Potomac River, including its swollen creeks and streams, through Monday. The advisory, issued Friday and based on information received from the National Weather Service and the Maryland Emergency Management Agency, covers the river from Cumberland to Great Falls. It could be extended Monday afternoon, if necessary. The water levels pose a threat to non white-water vessels, tubers, anglers and other recreational users and are caused by wave action, water velocity and treacherous currents.
NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Baltimore City's Household Hazardous Waste collection events begin April 4 and will continue every month on the first Friday and immediately following Saturday through October, Public Works Director Rudolph S. Chow announced Monday. City residents can dispose of hazardous household materials, such as pesticides, herbicides, car and household batteries, drain cleaners, oil-based paint and gasoline, according to a department of public works press release. Asbestos, ammunition, fire extinguishers, industrial and medical wastes and radioactive materials will not be accepted.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2014
Baltimore County officials announced plans Friday to install sidewalks along a road segment in Middle River where residents have complained about pedestrian dangers. The county has set aside $70,000 to construct an 800-foot stretch of sidewalk with handicap ramps on Bowleys Quarters Road from the intersection of Holly Grove Road to Carroll Island Road, near a local shopping center. County Council Chairwoman Cathy Bevins, who represents that community, said she's been working with County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's office for the last few years to secure the sidewalks.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
Motorists on Maryland roads approaching a police or emergency vehicle stopped on the shoulder with lights flashing are required by law to move over to the next lane or slow down to avoid the possibility of hitting anyone standing nearby. It's a sensible measure designed to protect law-enforcement and emergency personnel from becoming victims of the very traffic problems they are attempting to solve. But if you happen to be a tow truck operator assisting a disabled vehicle under similar circumstances, well, that's another story: You can put up orange cones and flash your lights all you want but other drivers are under no obligation to slow down, let alone change lanes to avoid you. They can whip past at 65 mph inches from where you're standing, and it's all perfectly legal.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2014
We like to think of our home as a safe haven where we can rest, unwind and enjoy times with friends and family. But there's danger lurking where you least expect it. More than half a million Marylanders suffered injuries that required hospital treatment in 2010, the most recent year statistics are available. Although health officials don't keep count of where those people were hurt, doctors and rescue workers say many injuries happen at home. However, the good news is many home dangers can be avoided.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
A tanker truck carrying non-hazardous resin overturned onto a median on eastbound Route 50 near Bowie Monday evening, state police confirmed. The driver was extricated and taken to an area hospital by Prince George's County emergency medical workers, Maryland State Police Sgt. Jon Hill said. The extent of the driver's injuries was unclear. All eastbound lanes and the westbound high-occupancy vehicle lane were expected to be closed for hours until another truck could pick up the cargo and the overturned tanker could be righted.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1998
An accident involving three tractor-trailers on the Bay Bridge yesterday morning spilled fuel and hazardous waste on the roadway, causing a 2-mile traffic jam on eastbound U.S. 50 and sending three drivers to the hospital.Maryland Transportation Authority officials said the incident occurred at 11: 23 a.m. when a tanker truck ran into the back of a flatbed truck as it was slowing down on the bridge. The accident caused a chain reaction when a bread truck then ran into the first two vehicles, puncturing the tanker.
NEWS
February 20, 2014
Doesn't Baltimore care about the safety of its schoolchildren? The sidewalks around Baltimore Polytechnic Institute have still not been cleared of snow along Cold Spring Lane ( "Storm dumps biggest snowfall since 2010 on a day possibly among area's top 10 snowiest on record," Feb. 14). This forces students to disembark MTA buses into a very busy right lane of traffic. I had to stop my car and put my flashers on to encourage other drivers to slow down and allow the students to cross the street safely.
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