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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
The sacred triumvirate of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven accounts for a crucial portion of what we call classical music, so there are plenty of reasons to program works by all three men on the same evening. There is also a risk of taking such material for granted, coasting on the familiarity of the structures and logical harmonic language. No worries about that, though, in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's serving of the three composers this week, since Nicholas McGegan is on the podium.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2014
The sacred triumvirate of Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven accounts for a crucial portion of what we call classical music, so there are plenty of reasons to program works by all three men on the same evening. There is also a risk of taking such material for granted, coasting on the familiarity of the structures and logical harmonic language. No worries about that, though, in the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's serving of the three composers this week, since Nicholas McGegan is on the podium.
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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
Annapolis Chorale music director J. Ernest Green closed the group's classical music season last weekend on a triumphant note with two performances of Joseph Haydn's "The Creation." Haydn's 1798 oratorio — scored for soprano, tenor and baritone soloists, chorus and orchestra — tells the story of the six days of creation. During the chorale's performance, it was given a powerful visual dimension through projected Hubble telescope images of Earth. Haydn and Hubble became a harmonious pairing, along with Renaissance masters Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, whose depictions of the creation of man joined hundreds of photos illustrating the infinite variety of human beauty.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2010
Annapolis Chorale music director J. Ernest Green closed the group's classical music season last weekend on a triumphant note with two performances of Joseph Haydn's "The Creation." Haydn's 1798 oratorio — scored for soprano, tenor and baritone soloists, chorus and orchestra — tells the story of the six days of creation. During the chorale's performance, it was given a powerful visual dimension through projected Hubble telescope images of Earth. Haydn and Hubble became a harmonious pairing, along with Renaissance masters Leonardo da Vinci and Michelangelo, whose depictions of the creation of man joined hundreds of photos illustrating the infinite variety of human beauty.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | April 15, 1994
The Naval Academy Glee Club's Spring Oratorio concert might appear to be the runt of the litter amid the visiting orchestras and opera companies on the academy's annual Distinguished Artists Series, but it never works out that way.In fact, the Requiems of Brahms and Mozart and Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana" have been among the highlights of recent seasons in these parts.This year's oratorio program, consisting of works by Sprenkle and Rachmaninoff, plus the magisterial "Lord Nelson" Mass of Haydn, may not have lived up to that admirable standard set in past years, but there was still much to enjoy.
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By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 22, 1994
The Peabody Opera Theatre gave a spirited presentation of "La Fedelta Premiata" on Friday, and should be commended for giving Baltimore a rare opportunity to experience this example of the neglected side of Haydn's creative output.Haydn always had a special place in his heart for this opera. Most authorities translate the title "Fidelity Rewarded," but Peabody decided on "The Perils of Fidelity." It was the inaugural work presented on Feb. 25, 1781, for a new opera house at the Esterhazy castle, where he was the court composer.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 24, 2007
With present-day reverberations of the Scopes trial never far from the national headlines, Haydn's pre-evolution-theory oratorio, The Creation, may give some listeners an extra kick. But this retelling of the six-day process described in Genesis doesn't ask anyone to take theological or political sides. It's just great music. Although one of the highest peaks in Haydn's output, The Creation doesn't turn up in concert all that often, making the Handel Choir of Baltimore's season-ending presentation of the piece Sunday most welcome.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 15, 2001
Annapolis and San Diego share the distinction of being the sailing capitals of their respective coasts. This weekend, they'll be sharing a conductor as well. Donald Barra, the founding music director of the San Diego Chamber Orchestra, will be in town Friday and Saturday evenings to guest-conduct the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra in a program of Mozart, Haydn, Kodaly and Corigliano. A product of Eastern institutions like Columbia University and the Eastman and Juilliard Schools of Music, Maestro Barra has become quite a musical presence in San Diego.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 27, 2000
The last concert composer Franz Joseph Haydn attended before his death took place in Vienna on March 27, 1808. The program consisted of a single work, Haydn's own oratorio, "The Creation," an extraordinary musical account he'd composed more than a decade earlier of the Book of Genesis. When conductor Antonio Salieri's chorus blazed in with that thumping C major chord at "And there was light" near the beginning of the piece, the enthusiastic audience immediately burst into applause. Haydn, a feeble 76-year-old with only a few months to live, pointed heavenward and said, "Not from me -- from there above comes everything."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 14, 2002
We don't hear much of Franz Joseph Haydn's oratorio The Seasons these days. That's a shame because while this musical collage of spring festivals, summer storms, autumnal hunts and cold, gloomy winter nights may not speak with the epic force of The Creation - the Austrian composer's supreme choral masterwork - The Seasons also exudes plenty of magic touches that only Haydn could provide. And in my book, that makes it worth hearing anytime a band of well-intentioned musicians gets together to pull it out of mothballs.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
All orchestras need to get back to their roots periodically, putting aside the big-gun Tchaikovsky and Mahler works and exploring the more intimately scaled world of Haydn. He was, after all, the "father of the symphony," the composer who created the mold and filled it more than 100 times. Haydn's symphonic works aren't played as regularly as they should be around here, which is one reason why the latest Baltimore Symphony Orchestra program is well worth catching. Another reason is that French conductor Louis Langr?
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | June 12, 2007
The National Symphony Orchestra wrapped up its 2006-2007 season with a concert that found both the ensemble and its music director, Leonard Slatkin, at the top of their game. As usual, Slatkin came up with a deft mix of repertoire - symphonies by Haydn (we could never get too much Haydn around here) and Mahler surrounded a premiere by American composer Mark Adamo. The latter's Four Angels, a concerto for harp and orchestra, was commissioned by the NSO for its longtime harpist, Dotian Levalier.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | April 24, 2007
With present-day reverberations of the Scopes trial never far from the national headlines, Haydn's pre-evolution-theory oratorio, The Creation, may give some listeners an extra kick. But this retelling of the six-day process described in Genesis doesn't ask anyone to take theological or political sides. It's just great music. Although one of the highest peaks in Haydn's output, The Creation doesn't turn up in concert all that often, making the Handel Choir of Baltimore's season-ending presentation of the piece Sunday most welcome.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 6, 2007
Reflections on war and peace, tragedy and hope have busied composers for centuries, leading to the creation of many a work that enjoys the label "timeless." The Baltimore Choral Arts Society's program Sunday afternoon at Goucher College explored two of those pieces, Haydn's Lord Nelson Mass and Bernstein's Chichester Psalms. There was also room for the local premiere of a composition that, while not in the same league, offered an eloquent reaction to the events of Sept. 11. The combination of repertoire and subject matter added up to an absorbing experience.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,sun music critic | February 13, 2007
If you're looking for something different to do on Valentine's Day, check out a Baltimore Chamber Orchestra concert devoted to one of the most famous composers you may never have heard of -- Ignace Joseph Pleyel. He barely registers on the public consciousness today, but this contemporary of Haydn's and Beethoven's enjoyed heady celebrity status, thanks to his tuneful, graceful compositions and some major business ventures. The music publishing house he founded in Paris in 1795 was a leader in its field for four decades.
NEWS
By EILEEN SOSKIN and EILEEN SOSKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 6, 2006
Along with your New Year's resolutions to exercise more and eat healthier, here's hoping you also have decided to give yourself the present of hearing live music more often. The first Candlelight Concert of 2006 offers an excellent opportunity to meet that resolution. The Cypress String Quartet performs string quartets by Haydn and Benjamin Lees, and is joined by guest violist Atar Arad for a performance of a late Brahms string quintet at 8 p.m. Saturday at Smith Theatre on the campus of Howard Community College.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 4, 2000
The real star of Saturday night's Haydn "Creation," performed by the Annapolis Chorale, wasn't conductor Ernest Green, his choir, or even his gorgeously adept solo soprano and bass. No, the true hero of the evening was Franz Joseph Haydn. And that's as it should be, for what a majestic, affirming, surpassingly tuneful account of the Book of Genesis he left us. Nearly all of what transpired under Green's baton proved admirable at the service of Haydn's greatest oratorio. His singers were nicely prepared, so that magnificent choruses such as "Awake the Harp," "Fulfilled at Last the Glorious Work" and the concluding "The Lord Is Great" rang out with authority and verve.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 9, 2005
The Handel Choir of Baltimore wrapped up its 70th anniversary season - and its first with artistic director Melinda O'Neal - sounding ready and able to try for 70 more. Saturday night's concert at Towson United Methodist Church reconfirmed that O'Neal's arrival has been a boon for the organization's musical health, which had been showing signs of strain in recent years. She started from scratch, re-auditioning, rather than grand-fathering in, previous singers and seeking new ones. Going for quality over quantity - the current roster is a little over 40, about half the size a few seasons ago - the director quickly built a good foundation for future development.
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