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NEWS
May 24, 2010
Joe Bartenfelder, a farmer and Baltimore County councilman who is running for county executive, grows hay for his daughter's horses on the bulk of a plot that he leases from Baltimore City — not even a cash crop for this hard-working farm family that shows up every single weekend of the year at Baltimore's local farmers markets. ("City to raise county councilman's rent," May 21.) He may be growing hay, but he's not the one making it. That old expression refers to those who take advantage of favorable circumstances.
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NEWS
By Tim Swift and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
A barn was destroyed after it caught fire Sunday in Ellicott City, the Howard County Fire Department said. The 60-by-30-foot hay barn was in the 10600 block of Clarksville Pike. The roof had collapsed by the time firefighters arrived, the department said. Authorities closed Route 108 in both directions between Centennial Lane and Cedar Lane because of the fire. timswift@baltsun.com
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EXPLORE
January 2, 2013
The Moxleys at McCoy Farms put up this snowman, made from wrapped bales of hay, in the 2800 block of Forge Hill Road in Bel Air. It is about 17 feet tall.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
Cory McCray spent his 18th birthday in a Baltimore jail cell. Antonio Hayes was raised by his grandmother when his mother's drug addiction got too bad. Brooke Lierman grew up in the affluent suburbs of Montgomery County, the daughter of a renowned political family. The three 30-somethings from disparate backgrounds are the new faces of Baltimore politics. Lierman, 35, was the top voter-getter in Southeast Baltimore's 46th District in last month's Democratic primary. Hayes, 36, took in more votes that any sitting delegate in West Baltimore's 40th District — ultimately ousting incumbent Shawn Z. Tarrant.
NEWS
September 15, 1991
The Cooperative Extension Service University of Maryland System is warning horse owners of a shortage of hay due to the current drought.The price of good quality alfalfa hay, one of the primary feeds for horses, is rising, and cheaper, lower-quality hay with a higher percentage of added concentrates may have to be used as a substitute.Backyard horse owners should consider locking in a price now fromhay growers, and building extra storage for hay.BEWARE NITRATE-POISONED PLANTSNitrate-poisoned forage feed plants, including corn, may be the result of the drought currently besieging the county.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | May 28, 1995
Havre de Grace. -- It had been a perfect spring day, and I was racing the shadows as I hurried to finish baling the hay from the first field we've cut this year.Some people often bale on into the evening, but I don't like to do that. Once the sun is gone the hay seems to pick up moisture from the air, and then it doesn't keep as well. On this afternoon, though, I figured I had just about enough daylight left to get the job done.There had been several interruptions already. First the tires on some of the wagons, which have been sitting idle since last fall, were low, and I had to get the compressor and reinflate them.
EXPLORE
May 22, 2013
An article in the May 24, 1913, edition of The Argus reported the damage to an area farm due to an early morning fire. A large barrack on the Wilton Farm, Wilkens avenue and Maiden Choice road, George J. Zaiser , owner, was destroyed by fire early Saturday morning, together with 13 head of sheep, 40 tons of hay, several tons of baled straw and a lot of farming implements. The loss will reach about $1,500, covered by insurance. The barking of their collie dog aroused Mr. Zaiser and his family.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 28, 1996
Hay Let's Dance, winner of the Wide Country Stakes this spring, heads a field of fillies in today's $30,000-added Office Queen Stakes at Pimlico over the 1 1/16-mile distance.Chief contention is expected to come from Dance For Jan, the leading money-earner with $99,077. Hay Let's Dance is to be ridden by James Johnston, and Mario Verge will pilot Dance For Jan.Pub Date: 7/28/96
SPORTS
By Roch Eric Kubatko and Roch Eric Kubatko,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
North County High School softball coach Sue Fitchett doesn't know which element was most responsible for her team's win over No. 1 Chesapeake yesterday -- Karen Hay's pitching or her players' long memories.Hay threw a three-hit shutout to lead the second-ranked Knights over the host Cougars, 2-0, in a rain-soaked game that provided some redemption for last year's season-ending loss to Chesapeake.In that game, North County built an early 4-0 lead, only to lose, 5-4, and end up without a playoff berth.
NEWS
By Steven Kivinski and Steven Kivinski,Staff writer | May 9, 1991
It was business as usual yesterday for North County's Karen Hay.The junior windmiller struck out 11 and hurled the 14th no-hitter of her still young career, as she led the Knights to a 3-0 victory over visiting Severna Park."
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Whatever else can be said about "Sean Saves the World," the Sean Hayes vehicle which premieres Thursday night on NBC, know that the sitcom doesn't treat sexuality with kid gloves. Take the explanation divorced gay dad Sean (played by out "Will & Grace" vet Hayes) gives his teenage daughter Ellie (Samantha Isler) when she asks -- in a convenient piece of pilot episode exposition -- how she came to be conceived. "Gay," Hayes says matter of factly. "Tried not to be. Was. Was again. Was one more time, because it was not unpleasant.
EXPLORE
May 22, 2013
An article in the May 24, 1913, edition of The Argus reported the damage to an area farm due to an early morning fire. A large barrack on the Wilton Farm, Wilkens avenue and Maiden Choice road, George J. Zaiser , owner, was destroyed by fire early Saturday morning, together with 13 head of sheep, 40 tons of hay, several tons of baled straw and a lot of farming implements. The loss will reach about $1,500, covered by insurance. The barking of their collie dog aroused Mr. Zaiser and his family.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2013
As the television networks announced their fall schedules during this week's upfronts, news was pretty mixed for TV's LGBT characters. The good news first: Former "Will & Grace" star Sean Hayes is returning to NBC with a new sitcom bound to touch on gay issues. In "Sean Saves the World," the openly gay Hayes stars as a divorced gay dad raising a teenage daughter (Sami Isler) with the aid of his overbearing mother (Linda Lavin). Judging by the trailer , the show will tread on conventional multi-camera sitcom ground, especially with that pushy laugh track.
EXPLORE
April 9, 2013
Needlework expert Kathleen Franetovich will be at Hays House Museum in Bel Air from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, April 14 to talk about schoolgirl samplers, decorative needlework created by young girls in Early America. For more than 120 years in Maryland, from the mid-18th to the mid-19th centuries, needlework was considered an indispensable subject in a young girl's education. Girls as young as 6 labored over their samplers as a means of teaching them the rudiments of reading and writing.
EXPLORE
February 13, 2013
The Hays-Heighe House at Harford Community College will host Emancipation and Its Legacies, a national traveling exhibition on display through Feb. 25. In conjunction with the exhibit, the Hays-Heighe House is sponsoring free programs and other events for the public. Developed by the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History in partnership with the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center, Emancipation and Its Legacies marks the sesquicentennial of President Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation.
EXPLORE
February 11, 2013
Members of the Country Garden Club of Harford County decorated Hays House for the holidays.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | June 1, 1997
HAVRE DE GRACE -- Darn kids. Don't want to do any work. Parents just as bad. Sit around waiting for government handouts. And as for the government . . . And so he harrumphed to himself, somewhat incoherently, as the tractor rumbled on and on through the diminishing afternoon.It was lovely clear weather, with a breeze stirring the windrows and helping the hay to dry, and the light had an almost Septembery feel to it. The surface of the pond sparkled, the cattle looked pretty against the green pastures, and the farm seemed a picture-book place.
NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | January 14, 1994
A large barn in the Upperco area containing 10 tons of hay and more than a dozen pieces of farm equipment burned to the ground in a three-alarm fire Wednesday night.The fire was discovered about 8 p.m. by Bruce Davidson, son of farm owner I. Watson Davidson, as he walked out of a garage next to his house, about 500 yards from the barn in the 1100 block of Emory Church Road.Bruce Davidson operates the Davidson Christmas Tree Farm, where hundreds of people cut their own tree during the holiday season.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2013
Charles L. Hayes, former secretary and senior vice president of Monumental Life Insurance Co., died Feb. 3 of cancer at the Brookshire Hospice in Hillsborough, N.C. The former Towson resident was 85. Charles Lawton Hayes was born and raised in Cherryville, N.C., where he graduated in 1944 from Lowell High School. After serving in the Navy during the waning days of World War II, Mr. Hayes enrolled at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he was a member of Phi Beta Kappa and earned a bachelor's degree in business in 1949.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
Chris Hayes, an editor at large of The Nation and host of the talk show bearing his name on MSNBC, was raised in a working-class neighborhood but attended some of the most exclusive schools on the planet. "I grew up in the Bronx," says the affable, 33-year-old anchor of "Up With Chris Hayes. " "My mother was the daughter of an Italian deli owner. But I'm also hugely a product of the meritocracy, and for that reason I have my own affection for it. " Both experiences provided fodder for his much-discussed first book, "Twilight of the Elites: America after Meritocracy.
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