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September 12, 2006
Joseph Ward Sener, a retired Legg Mason executive and avid wildfowl hunter, died of stroke complications Sept. 4 at his Church Hill home. The former Roland Park resident was 80. A Baltimore native raised in Homeland, he was a 1944 graduate of Boys' Latin School and attained the rank of sergeant while serving in the Army Air Forces during the final days of World War II. After graduating from Haverford College in 1950, he became a trainee broker for...
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NEWS
May 30, 2014
There has been much tsk-tsking this college graduation season about students protesting their administration-chosen commencement speakers ( "It's speech season on campus - and it's notable for ones not given," May 21). The finger-waggers seem to take one of two positions: 1) We weren't rude like that in our day; or 2) Leftist faculty have corrupted the values we tried to give our children and done away with free speech. Set aside for the moment the question of how effective 18 years of parental influence could have been if it can be wiped out by a couple of hours a week with a college faculty member.
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NEWS
September 13, 2006
Joseph Ward Sener Jr., a retired Legg Mason executive and avid wildfowl hunter, died of complications from a stroke Sept. 4 at his Church Hill home. The former Roland Park resident was 80. A Baltimore native raised in Homeland, he was a 1944 graduate of Boys' Latin School and attained the rank of sergeant while serving in the Army Air Forces during the final days of World War II. After graduating from Haverford College in 1950, he became a trainee broker for John C. Legg Co., a predecessor of Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc. He was elected a general partner of the firm in 1961 and later managed the company's investment banking department.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 21, 2014
It is the season for graduations and graduation speeches, most of which dissolve into the sunshine, remembered by no one, but particularly not the happy graduates. That is changing. The season is now memorable for the speeches that are not given, the speakers having been driven off by student activists. Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice withdrew from her scheduled appearance at Rutgers after students protested her acquiescence to President George W. Bush during the war in Iraq.
NEWS
November 2, 2011
The death of former Evening Sun editorial writer Jim Bready will be marked, as it should be, by appreciative memories of a journalist who captured with near perfect pitch the quirkiness of the city he loved. It should also be noted that Haverford College - his alma mater, and mine - lost a devoted and loving son. He adored Haverford. (Not that he shared all of the teachings of the Society of Friends. The Breadys' storied Christmas party, which was for many a vigorous celebration of the death of Prohibition, was proof of that.)
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
HAVERFORD, Pa. -- After playing most of the summer with the U.S. Under-19 women's lacrosse team, Emily Fenwick sometimes wishes she would come home to play her senior year at Roland Park."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Edward H. "Ham" Welbourn Jr., a retired insurance executive and World War II veteran, died April 29 of complications from dementia at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 98. The son of Edward H. Welbourn, who owned Rennous Kleinle Brush Manufacturers in Catonsville, and Emma Dawson Welbourn, a homemaker, Edward Hambleton Welbourn was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. After graduating in 1934 from the Gilman School, Mr. Welbourn enrolled at Haverford College, where he was a government major and earned a bachelor's degree in 1938.
NEWS
May 30, 2014
There has been much tsk-tsking this college graduation season about students protesting their administration-chosen commencement speakers ( "It's speech season on campus - and it's notable for ones not given," May 21). The finger-waggers seem to take one of two positions: 1) We weren't rude like that in our day; or 2) Leftist faculty have corrupted the values we tried to give our children and done away with free speech. Set aside for the moment the question of how effective 18 years of parental influence could have been if it can be wiped out by a couple of hours a week with a college faculty member.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | January 15, 1995
I know you probably have a lot on your mind already, but you should be aware that 90 percent of the universe is missing.At least that's what astronomers are claiming. I personally wouldn't know. My only exposure to the universe was an astronomy course I took in my sophomore year at Haverford College (motto: "We Never Heard of You, Either"), and the only astronomical principle I learned was that, because of the rotation of the Earth about its axis, astronomy class started way too early in the morning to actually attend in person.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Edward Trail Mathias, a retired banker and longtime denizen of Bolton Hill, died June 17 from complications of a stroke at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 85. The son of Charles McCurdy Mathias, a lawyer, and Theresa Mcelfresh Trail Mathias, a homemaker, Edward Trail Mathias — he never used his first name — was born in Baltimore and raised in the family home on Court Square in Frederick. He graduated from Frederick High School in 1943, and took an additional year of high school studies at the Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., from which he graduated in 1944.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2013
Edward Trail Mathias, a retired banker and longtime denizen of Bolton Hill, died June 17 from complications of a stroke at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 85. The son of Charles McCurdy Mathias, a lawyer, and Theresa Mcelfresh Trail Mathias, a homemaker, Edward Trail Mathias — he never used his first name — was born in Baltimore and raised in the family home on Court Square in Frederick. He graduated from Frederick High School in 1943, and took an additional year of high school studies at the Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va., from which he graduated in 1944.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
Edward H. "Ham" Welbourn Jr., a retired insurance executive and World War II veteran, died April 29 of complications from dementia at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. He was 98. The son of Edward H. Welbourn, who owned Rennous Kleinle Brush Manufacturers in Catonsville, and Emma Dawson Welbourn, a homemaker, Edward Hambleton Welbourn was born in Baltimore and raised in Catonsville. After graduating in 1934 from the Gilman School, Mr. Welbourn enrolled at Haverford College, where he was a government major and earned a bachelor's degree in 1938.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
Christopher Van Hollen Sr., a retired Foreign Service officer and ambassador to Sri Lanka, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Jan. 30 at the Washington Home and Hospice. The former Baltimore resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised in Cedarcroft, he was the grandson of George Henry Van Hollen, a seafood packer and owner of the Atlantic Packing Co. The family also developed the Cedarcroft section of North Baltimore and lent its name to Hollen Road. His father, Donald Van Hollen, was a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee who later worked at the family's seafood business.
NEWS
November 2, 2011
The death of former Evening Sun editorial writer Jim Bready will be marked, as it should be, by appreciative memories of a journalist who captured with near perfect pitch the quirkiness of the city he loved. It should also be noted that Haverford College - his alma mater, and mine - lost a devoted and loving son. He adored Haverford. (Not that he shared all of the teachings of the Society of Friends. The Breadys' storied Christmas party, which was for many a vigorous celebration of the death of Prohibition, was proof of that.)
NEWS
September 13, 2006
Joseph Ward Sener Jr., a retired Legg Mason executive and avid wildfowl hunter, died of complications from a stroke Sept. 4 at his Church Hill home. The former Roland Park resident was 80. A Baltimore native raised in Homeland, he was a 1944 graduate of Boys' Latin School and attained the rank of sergeant while serving in the Army Air Forces during the final days of World War II. After graduating from Haverford College in 1950, he became a trainee broker for John C. Legg Co., a predecessor of Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc. He was elected a general partner of the firm in 1961 and later managed the company's investment banking department.
NEWS
September 12, 2006
Joseph Ward Sener, a retired Legg Mason executive and avid wildfowl hunter, died of stroke complications Sept. 4 at his Church Hill home. The former Roland Park resident was 80. A Baltimore native raised in Homeland, he was a 1944 graduate of Boys' Latin School and attained the rank of sergeant while serving in the Army Air Forces during the final days of World War II. After graduating from Haverford College in 1950, he became a trainee broker for...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
Christopher Van Hollen Sr., a retired Foreign Service officer and ambassador to Sri Lanka, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Jan. 30 at the Washington Home and Hospice. The former Baltimore resident was 90. Born in Baltimore and raised in Cedarcroft, he was the grandson of George Henry Van Hollen, a seafood packer and owner of the Atlantic Packing Co. The family also developed the Cedarcroft section of North Baltimore and lent its name to Hollen Road. His father, Donald Van Hollen, was a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee who later worked at the family's seafood business.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 21, 2014
It is the season for graduations and graduation speeches, most of which dissolve into the sunshine, remembered by no one, but particularly not the happy graduates. That is changing. The season is now memorable for the speeches that are not given, the speakers having been driven off by student activists. Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice withdrew from her scheduled appearance at Rutgers after students protested her acquiescence to President George W. Bush during the war in Iraq.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,Sun Staff Writer | August 11, 1995
HAVERFORD, Pa. -- After playing most of the summer with the U.S. Under-19 women's lacrosse team, Emily Fenwick sometimes wishes she would come home to play her senior year at Roland Park."
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY | January 15, 1995
I know you probably have a lot on your mind already, but you should be aware that 90 percent of the universe is missing.At least that's what astronomers are claiming. I personally wouldn't know. My only exposure to the universe was an astronomy course I took in my sophomore year at Haverford College (motto: "We Never Heard of You, Either"), and the only astronomical principle I learned was that, because of the rotation of the Earth about its axis, astronomy class started way too early in the morning to actually attend in person.
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