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NEWS
July 8, 1992
The Czech Republic has two-thirds of Czechoslovakia's people, three-fourths of its gross national product and four-fifths of its foreign investment. Unemployment is 3 percent there, and 11 percent in the Slovak Republic. Small wonder the Slovaks last month gave the most votes to a party committed to independence. And small wonder that the Czech Republic is better equipped for a separate future than is Slovakia.The Czechoslovakian parliament probably doomed federal Czechoslovakia. In a complicated process designed to provide veto power to each nationality, it rejected Vaclav Havel's continuation as president, against no opponent.
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July 24, 2013
Thomas and Christine Havel of Bel Air announce the engagement of their daughter, Nichole, to Justin Reigle, son of Raymond and Sharon Reigle of Bel Air. Havel and Reigle are 2001 graduates of Bel Air High School. Reigle is a graduate of Towson University and is a computer scientist for ATC at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Havel is a graduate of MICA and is the owner and operator of Pathways Massage in Cockeysville. The couple is planning a June 2014 wedding.
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NEWS
July 28, 1992
The departure of Vaclav Havel from the office of president of Czechoslovakia allows the parliaments of its two republics to concentrate on the terms of their dissolution. It is a sad exit. The world has not seen the last act of the playwright Mr. Havel as a politician, in all probability. But a revival would be on the smaller stage of the Czech Republic, without Slovakia. His theater always did play better in small, intimate houses.Czechoslovakia is not quite dead yet, but life support systems have been removed.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Special To The Sun | November 1, 2007
The Increased Difficulty of Concentration. No, that's not the title of a research paper on attention deficit disorder. The disorder that disrupts concentration in Vaclav Havel's 1968 play is social and political. Weighty as this may sound, Havel uses the structure of farce to tell his tale of a beleaguered social scientist participating in a decidedly odd study on individuality. If you go The Increased Difficulty of Concentration runs 8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St. Tickets are $20. Call 410-752-8558 or go to theatreproject.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | July 30, 1992
Czechoslovakia's end comes as no surprise. There was an artificiality to its creation that foretold a short history, although the Slovaks who have broken up the union are the more likely to suffer from its loss.The departure of Vaclav Havel from public life -- if this is permanent -- is perhaps more to be regretted, not because he was a great statesman, or had the time to demonstrate that he was such, but because he brought a quality of detachment and reflection to politics rare at any time, and rarest most of all today in East, Central and Balkan Europe, and the ex-Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2000
"Vaclav Havel: A Political Tragedy in Six Acts," by John Keane. Basic Books. 532 pages. $27.50. In the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet control, no heroes shine more brightly than Lech Walesa, the valiant electrician who came out of the Gdansk shipyards to lead Poland to freedom, and Vaclav Havel, the bourgeois writer of absurdist plays who made it from prison to the Czech presidency in the 1989 "Velvet Revolution." History will pair these two, and rightly so, even though Walesa receives only cursory mention in this first full-fledged biography of Havel.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | January 27, 1993
PRAGUE -- Less than one month after the demise of the Czechoslovak federation he sought to preserve, Vaclav Havel was elected president yesterday of one-half of it, the new Czech Republic.Mr. Havel, the former Czechoslovak president and a leader of the 1989 "Velvet Revolution" that overthrew communism here, was chosen by 109 of the 200 deputies of the Czech Parliament.Debate was interrupted when a bomb scare forced officials to clear the parliament's chambers for nearly an hour. No bomb was found.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 4, 1992
PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia -- Czechoslovakia's Parliament rejected yesterday the re-election of President Vaclav Havel, the father of the "Velvet Revolution" that overthrew Communist rule in this country in 1989.With Slovak deputies casting the decisive vote, Mr. Havel's defeat was widely viewed as another step toward the breakup of the 74-year-old union of Czechs and Slovaks."I am not suggesting that there is an absolute correlation between victory for Vaclav Havel and continuing the federation," said Vaclav Klaus, leader of the largest Czech party.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | June 23, 1992
CZECHOSLOVAKIA -- The saddest reading circulating through Europe and the United States this week may be Vaclav Havel's "I Have a Dream for Czechoslovakia" essay.The dream of the playwright-philosopher president for his splintering country is not in itself sad; it anticipates a sort of post-Communist Jeffersonian utopia.But the irony of his essay's appearance in Germany and the United States as Czechoslovakia breaks itself in two is poignant.The Czechs and the Slovaks, the major ethnic groups that make up his country, have in effect already rejected Mr. Havel's dream.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | February 2, 1993
PRAGUE -- Vaclav Havel is back at the helm of a new, downsized Czech Republic, but both man and country have changed profoundly since the heady days of Czechoslovakia's 1989 revolution.If Czechoslovakia brought the world the "Velvet Revolution" -- a nearly bloodless turnover of power that seemed to promise a new era of decency, honesty and prosperity for the country -- the new Czech Republic will likely be a far more prosaic affair.Czechs today are more interested in the nuts and bolts of economic reform than in the issues of human rights and culture that seem to matter most to Mr. Havel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2007
Havel play The lowdown -- The True Comedy Theatre Company will perform a new English translation of former Czech President Vaclav Havel's play The Increased Difficulty of Concentration. This play, about a social scientist's relationships with four women -- his wife, mistress, secretary and a colleague -- will be performed with original rock music. If you go -- The play runs through Nov. 4 at 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and 3 p.m. Sundays at the Theatre Project, 45 W. Preston St. Tickets are $10-$20.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman and Ellen Goodman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 29, 2003
BOSTON -- Uh oh, Arnold. What happened to the "Oprah" strategy? Wasn't that you sitting on Ms. Winfrey's sofa a couple of weeks ago talking about family? And weren't you the guy who bragged that he loved to shop for his wife? Weren't you test driving the newer, softer you to woo women voters all over the left coast? After all that effort, Arnold, it probably wasn't the best idea to tell Arianna Huffington, "I have a perfect part for you in `Terminator 4.'" I mean, even those who never saw Terminator 3 (or 2 or 1)
NEWS
February 7, 2003
A huge heart was hung atop the 1,000-year-old Prague Castle in November, and it beat in a great splash of red neon until Czech President Vaclav Havel left office Sunday. Jiri David, the artist who created the 56-foot-by-56-foot neon sculpture, installed it over the president's headquarters to celebrate the 13th anniversary of the Velvet Revolution in what was once Czechoslovakia. "A heart is a symbol of love, understanding and decency," Havel said when he switched on the heart, "and that was something that accompanied our Velvet Revolution."
NEWS
February 4, 2003
ON OCT. 27, 1989, the police in communist Czechoslovakia hauled in a red-headed, chain-smoking, truth-speaking playwright whom they viewed as a threat to the regime. Less than two months later, that playwright was elected president of what had by that time become an ex-communist country. "History has accelerated," Vaclav Havel told a joint session of the U.S. Congress that winter. Mr. Havel -- who entered office as a rumpled dissident, fond of rock music and of making himself intolerable to authority -- stepped down on Sunday.
NEWS
By Bruce I. Konviser and Bruce I. Konviser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2002
PRAGUE, Czech Republic -- Much has changed here since the halcyon days of November 1989, when a shaggy, chain-smoking dissident named Vaclav Havel, armed with little more than moral courage, took on the all-powerful Communist government. Astonishingly, the dissident prevailed. Havel engineered what became known as the Velvet Revolution, negotiating the Communists out of power and becoming the first pst-Communist president of what was then Czechoslovakia. After serving virtually all of the past 13 years as president, the often-ailing leader will retire in January when his term expires.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joseph R.L. Sterne and Joseph R.L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2000
"Vaclav Havel: A Political Tragedy in Six Acts," by John Keane. Basic Books. 532 pages. $27.50. In the liberation of Eastern Europe from Soviet control, no heroes shine more brightly than Lech Walesa, the valiant electrician who came out of the Gdansk shipyards to lead Poland to freedom, and Vaclav Havel, the bourgeois writer of absurdist plays who made it from prison to the Czech presidency in the 1989 "Velvet Revolution." History will pair these two, and rightly so, even though Walesa receives only cursory mention in this first full-fledged biography of Havel.
FEATURES
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 30, 1990
She slyly removes her glasses, tosses aside her schoolgirl innocence and then, mustering all her charms and blondness, Donna Rice implores the older gentleman to let her love him, feed his starving soul, bring his "failing heart back to life."But hold the tabloids. This is not Donna Rice, temptress.This is Donna Rice, actress.And this is not some flirty jeans commercial. This is serious.Donna's doing Havel.The former model, famed for her relationship with '88 presidential hopeful Gary Hart, has been studying theater in Northern Virginia for the last 1 1/2 years and now makes her theatrical debut in a community theater production of "Largo Desolato" by Czechoslovakian playwright and president Vaclav Havel.
NEWS
By Bruce I. Konviser and Bruce I. Konviser,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 18, 2002
PRAGUE, Czech Republic -- Much has changed here since the halcyon days of November 1989, when a shaggy, chain-smoking dissident named Vaclav Havel, armed with little more than moral courage, took on the all-powerful Communist government. Astonishingly, the dissident prevailed. Havel engineered what became known as the Velvet Revolution, negotiating the Communists out of power and becoming the first pst-Communist president of what was then Czechoslovakia. After serving virtually all of the past 13 years as president, the often-ailing leader will retire in January when his term expires.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | August 8, 1999
What is the artist's place in politics and society? Can art effect change? These are among the themes explored by the Potomac Theatre Project in two productions being presented in repertory at Olney Theatre Center -- "Stanley" and "Havel: The Passion of Thought."The plays, which run through Aug. 29, inaugurate Olney's new Mulitz-Gudelsky Family Theatre Lab.Based on the life of the late British artist Stanley Spencer, Pam Gems' "Stanley" had a brief Broadway run in 1997. Alan Wade portrays Spencer at Olney, under Cheryl Faraone's direction.
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne | November 22, 1998
WHEN Madeleine Albright visited her Czech homeland in 1990, she had her first chance to meet Vaclav Havel, the leader of his country's "Velvet Revolution," which ended more than 40 years of Communist oppression."
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