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By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,New York Times | February 5, 1992
PARIS -- Caught between the glories of its past and the uncertainties of its future, the haute couture industry has been presenting a fragmented image in the showings of its spring and summer collections this week.Forgetting that fashion is based on change, some couturiers are reliving their past successes and others are marching in place, while a few are showing eccentric clothes.Discussions are going on at every level as to whether the rules for acceptance to the Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne should be changed, as if that will solve everything.
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By Laura Vozzella | laura.vozzella@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 3, 2010
Just like Hollywood actors and actresses of a certain age, popcorn has had a little work done. A little nip here, a little tuck there, and pretty soon Orville Redenbacher is looking like George Clooney. The classic movie theater treat, a natural for Oscar parties this weekend, has gotten so glammed up that it is making cameos on menus in high-end restaurants. Cooked in duck fat and adorned with truffle oil and truffle sea salt at a North Baltimore bistro. Spiced up with sriracha and tossed into a spinach salad in a Canton eatery.
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By Mark McDonald and Mark McDonald,Dallas Morning News | February 26, 1992
PARIS -- First came the tuxedos, wave after wave of them, squadrons of models marching to the brink of the stage of the Opera Bastille.Then came the satins, iridescent and ablaze. Then the pastels, the Russian peasant dresses, the see-throughs, the Braques and the Matisses, a white wedding dress, capes, embroideries, hundreds of models on the stage, wearing the whole history of the house of Yves Saint Laurent.Then came Yves Saint Laurent himself, fat, unsteady, trembling with nervousness, blinking incredulously at the standing ovation from the crowd of 2,800 that had assembled to celebrate his 30 years of haute couture.
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By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2008
Yves Saint Laurent, the French fashion designer who created a bold new dress code for women during the feminist revolution of the 1970s and helped launch the era of the celebrity designer with his jet-set lifestyle, died yesterday at 71. He died at his Paris home after a long illness, Pierre Berge, his longtime friend and business partner, told the Associated Press. From the start of his career at 21, when he replaced his mentor, Christian Dior, as chief designer of the couture house of Dior in Paris, he crafted a modern look for women that set a new standard.
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By Mary Rourke and Mary Rourke,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2008
Yves Saint Laurent, the French fashion designer who created a bold new dress code for women during the feminist revolution of the 1970s and helped launch the era of the celebrity designer with his jet-set lifestyle, died yesterday at 71. He died at his Paris home after a long illness, Pierre Berge, his longtime friend and business partner, told the Associated Press. From the start of his career at 21, when he replaced his mentor, Christian Dior, as chief designer of the couture house of Dior in Paris, he crafted a modern look for women that set a new standard.
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By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | July 25, 1999
A plane ticket to Paris in July: $821.Four nights at the Hotel Ritz: $3,040.Sunglasses to look cool in the front row: $150.Being able to see the fall/ winter fashion collections from your favorite easy chair: priceless.This Thursday, fashion fans can get an insider's tour of haute couture with "Paris Fashion Collections," which airs at 9 p.m. on ABC (Channel 2). With fashion industry veteran Isabella Rossellini as host, the program will showcase the collections of 25 of the world's top design houses, including Dior, Chanel, Versace and Lacroix.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser | August 22, 1992
Nan Duskin casts a wider netNan Duskin is getting into middle-class values. The new owners of the haute couture clothing store at Cross Keys say the Baltimore store is going to be a lot less haute in the future.The rich and fashionable will still be able to buy $3,000 Chanel dresses and $190 Hermes men's shirts, but they might have to rub elbows with commoners who won't pay more than $70 for a pair of shorts from Ralph Lauren.President Marilyn Cooper, who, along with Chairman Lou Marks, bought the Nan Duskin chain last month, also promised the Baltimore store no longer will be a "stepchild" to the chain's two Philadephia boutiques.
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By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2006
Vincent Licari knelt down next to an elegant black dress draped over a mannequin and gathered a swath of material. "This is some of the finest Italian-made silk in the world," he said, holding the luxurious fabric up to the light. "Look at the edge. It looks like velvet and it doesn't fray, even when you rub it." He walked across the room at his Fallston home to an exquisite gown with a decollete neckline and hand-sewn spangled beads. "This material is incredible," said Licari, almost mesmerized by the fabric as he grasped it lightly.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | January 13, 1996
In "The Taming of the Shrew," the hero and heroine, Petruchio and Katharine, get married quickly -- only days after they've met. At Center Stage, director Jackson Phippin has taken his cue from the brevity of that courtship.He has staged hios modernized Shakespearean comedy with such rip-roaring pacing that the whole kit and caboodle --which includes not one, not two, but three weddings -- is wrapped up in a lickety-split hour and 50 minutes. And a fun hour and 50 minutes it is.The tone is set in the opening minutes, in which sound designer Mark Bennett introduces the play with a Neapolitan mandolin rendition of the theme from "The Godfather."
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 3, 2007
Some time back, we broke the news that Demi Moore was hard at work trying to produce, direct and star in a feature film about Coco Chanel's life. But Demi, who looks as if she could still interpret Chanel's early years, has finally given up on this dream. Financing is difficult under any circumstances, but there are now three - count 'em three - biopics in the works on Coco. One will star Audrey Tautou. Then there's William Friedkin's version of Chanel, to star Marina Hands. And writer/director Daniele Thompson also has definite plans to bring the fashion genius to life onscreen.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 3, 2007
Some time back, we broke the news that Demi Moore was hard at work trying to produce, direct and star in a feature film about Coco Chanel's life. But Demi, who looks as if she could still interpret Chanel's early years, has finally given up on this dream. Financing is difficult under any circumstances, but there are now three - count 'em three - biopics in the works on Coco. One will star Audrey Tautou. Then there's William Friedkin's version of Chanel, to star Marina Hands. And writer/director Daniele Thompson also has definite plans to bring the fashion genius to life onscreen.
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By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun reporter | July 25, 2007
They say French women don't get fat, but if Baltimore actress-comedian Mo'Nique has her way, they'll soon get F.A.T. The third season of the plus-size beauty competition, Mo'Nique's F.A.T. Chance, is set in Paris, the fashion and beauty capital of the world. On TV Mo'Nique's F.A.T. Chance: Paris airs at 8 p.m. Saturday on Oxygen.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | July 2, 2006
In the movie The Devil Wears Prada, viewers watch as our heroine Anne Hathaway goes from a style-less blah to a stylish beauty with clothes, shoes and accessories any woman would swoon for. Chanel jackets. Gucci skirts. Giuseppe Zanotti pumps. Christian Louboutin calf-high boots. But Hathaway's Andy Sachs has help -- in a big way. She's able to borrow the latest, most coveted designer clothes from the storage closet of a fictional, glossy fashion magazine. Most of us aren't quite that lucky.
NEWS
By CASSANDRA A. FORTIN and CASSANDRA A. FORTIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 8, 2006
Vincent Licari knelt down next to an elegant black dress draped over a mannequin and gathered a swath of material. "This is some of the finest Italian-made silk in the world," he said, holding the luxurious fabric up to the light. "Look at the edge. It looks like velvet and it doesn't fray, even when you rub it." He walked across the room at his Fallston home to an exquisite gown with a decollete neckline and hand-sewn spangled beads. "This material is incredible," said Licari, almost mesmerized by the fabric as he grasped it lightly.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 14, 2004
A FI Silver Theatre in Silver Spring celebrates the 50th anniversary of Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window with a weeklong engagement beginning with two showings today (6:40 p.m. and 9:10 p.m.). It's more than one of Hitchcock's greatest comedies of terrors. Set in a Greenwich Village apartment and its adjoining courtyards, this urban variation on the backyard-murder story is a once-over-lightly satire of the quality of modern life and a once-over-thoroughly exploration of the allure of voyeurism.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | May 4, 2003
For more than 40 years, Oscar de la Renta has been in the business of making women fall in love. He doesn't rely on flowers, candlelight dinners or the myriad other methods of romantic trickery. Instead, he's called on a glorious silk brocade jacket, a cape of warm cashmere or a fairytale evening gown with fluttering ostrich feathers to help him win the hearts of countless women. When designing, he says, he anticipates the moment that a woman meets a beautiful dress. "I always say, 'Creating clothes is like falling in love,' " de la Renta says during a recent visit to Saks Fifth Avenue in Chevy Chase.
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By TAMARA IKENBERG and TAMARA IKENBERG,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2000
Kate Betts is reinventing Harper's Bazaar for a generation more attuned to cable TV than Christian Dior. Under the new editor-in-chief, the 132-year-old magazine is less about expenses and exclusion, and all about edge and inclusion. No garden party snottiness, no isolated runway-speak, no obscure designer name-dropping. February's Bazaar is the first to fully show off Betts' redesign. You'll find pieces from "Sex and the City" author Candace Bushnell, an essay by "American Psycho" prodigy Bret Easton Ellis, and cheeky charts and features that cooly combine Hollywood and haute couture.
NEWS
By Tina Cassidy and Tina Cassidy,THE BOSTON GLOBE | April 6, 2003
Alice Roi's personal taste ranges from long underwear from Wal-Mart to togs from Chanel. That yawning gap between the mundane and the fabulous, and the street and the runway, is where 27-year-old Roi, one of a handful of fresh-faced New York-based designers catapulting into the fashion business, seems most comfortable, having grown up in a city where poverty and wealth coexist on a grand scale. And the clothes she creates -- as well as the ones she wears -- have the same quirky split personality that is spurring celebrities and major retailers to embrace her collections.
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