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By Audrey A. Cockrum and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Every fall, haunted attractions rise from the dead after a year-long rest. And each year, haunted houses, hayrides and trails find a new and creepier way to scare Marylanders. Don't want to spend an arm and a leg? Check out Kim's Krypt in Essex. Looking for a combination of fear-filled attractions and family-friendly amusements? Bring the family to Frightland in Delaware. Want to be so scared you'll be have nightmares until New Year's? Visit Terror Behind the Walls at Eastern State Penitentiary.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Audrey A. Cockrum and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Every fall, haunted attractions rise from the dead after a year-long rest. And each year, haunted houses, hayrides and trails find a new and creepier way to scare Marylanders. Don't want to spend an arm and a leg? Check out Kim's Krypt in Essex. Looking for a combination of fear-filled attractions and family-friendly amusements? Bring the family to Frightland in Delaware. Want to be so scared you'll be have nightmares until New Year's? Visit Terror Behind the Walls at Eastern State Penitentiary.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Six employees at an Essex haunted house were taken to a local hospital after they became sick from spilled formaldehyde Friday night, Baltimore County police said. The chemical was used in the display at Kim's Krypt Haunted Attraction on Eastern Boulevard, police said. Firefighters were called around 9:15 p.m. to clean up the spill. The haunted house was closed for the evening, police said. Nov. 3 is the attraction's last scheduled day for the season. jkanderson@baltsun.com
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
Jill and Allan Bennett have filled a 22,000-square foot building with a dark and creepy mix of bloody monsters and pitch-black mazes. But soon their popular haunted house, Bennett's Curse, will be homeless, as the property they lease in Jessup is slated for development. The grassy field where their white building holds giant vampire bats, menacing monsters and creepy grim reapers will eventually become part of a mixed-use development of townhouses, shops and offices. So even as they open this weekend for their fall season, the Bennetts are scouting for a new location to set up their fright show for next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
If running a haunted house is your career goal, it seems best to start young. And it doesn't hurt if you're a little twisted. Allan Bennett, who's spent a decade operating Bennett's Curse (which moved this year from Arundel Mills to Blob's Park in Jessup), insists he was 4 or 5 years old when he started scaring the neighborhood kids. Patrick Barberry, who's been creeping people out with Legends of the Fog in Aberdeen the past four years, was about 8 when a company rented out part of the family farm to set up a haunted hayride — planting a seed that would grow to horrific proportions once Barberry graduated from college in 2006 and decided to use part of the farm for similar grisly purposes.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 18, 1995
Bobbi McKinney loves the view from her 10th-floor apartment in the 700 block of Lexington St. She's loved it since she was the little 7-year-old girl who moved there when the building first opened in 1959.Staring out her window, she looks longingly toward South Baltimore, watching cars and vans and trucks snake their way along the several thoroughfares leading from the city."I can watch the city come to life from up here," she said. "I throw bread out to the sea gulls, and they catch it in midair.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
The hardest part, writing about a Haunted House?How do you spell a scream?There's AIYEEEEE, but that's more like what a bronco rider screeches just before being thrown off the bronco. There's ARGHHHH, but that's what Charlie Brown yells when Lucy pulls away the football. There's EEEEKKKK, which is what Little Miss Muffet exclaimed when the spider sat down beside her, so that's close.Still, it's not quite right. It doesn't quite capture the combination of surprise, fear and joy that's the benchmark of a good Halloween-style Haunted House.
NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 1997
RHYTHMIC sounds of clogging echoed through Mount Airy Elementary School yesterday morning as students were introduced to this form of American dance by Footworks Percussive Dance Ensemble.The professional dance group performed "Steps Around the World," in which students learned about the importance of the American melting pot and the unique forms of step dancing, clogging and tap.The artists performed a hambone dance and then taught the children how to make rhythms with their hands.Next, the audience stood and practiced basic foot rhythms used in clogging.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow | October 26, 1995
We like to scare ourselves silly, don't we? Here are some more opportunities to get weak in the knees around the area:Anne Arundel CountyHalloween Happenings, 7 p.m.-10 p.m. today through Halloween, Anne Arundel County Fairgrounds, off state Route 178 in Crownsville. Includes haunted barn and hayride. Admission $8 adults, kids 5 and under free; today only, reduced admission $7.Baltimore CityScary Tales at the Tower, readings of spooky stories, including Edgar Allan Poe's "The Tell Tale Heart," at 11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m. Saturday, Baltimore Shot Tower at the Baltimore City Life Museums, Front and Fayette streets.
NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,SUN STAFF | July 31, 1996
A month from now, the footsteps and shouts of hundreds of children will echo through the halls of North Glen Elementary School, and guidance counselor Millie DeSimone won't have much quiet time to get to know her charges.That's why she has invited children to visit her at school this summer, to read a favorite story, play a game, draw a picture, eat lunch or talk about problems or vacations. They can even bring friends."My thinking was that it would be good for them to come in to more or less establish a rapport with them, to talk to them, to let them know someone cares and to do some self-esteem building," said DeSimone.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
James L. Akers Jr., a retired financial analyst and businessman who collected and restored vintage arcade machines, died Wednesday of kidney cancer at his Ellicott City home. He was 73. The son of a dentist and a homemaker, James Lee Akers Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Regester Avenue in Stoneleigh. Herbert W. Dorsey grew up a few doors away, and they remained lifelong friends. "It was a neighborhood of boys, and we naturally gravitated to his home because Jim had a pool table," said Mr. Dorsey, a retired Public Health Service officer who lives in Bethesda.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Six employees at an Essex haunted house were taken to a local hospital after they became sick from spilled formaldehyde Friday night, Baltimore County police said. The chemical was used in the display at Kim's Krypt Haunted Attraction on Eastern Boulevard, police said. Firefighters were called around 9:15 p.m. to clean up the spill. The haunted house was closed for the evening, police said. Nov. 3 is the attraction's last scheduled day for the season. jkanderson@baltsun.com
TRAVEL
By Jake Fewster, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
The eerie sound of a pipe organ fills the air on Ocean City 's boardwalk as families, couples and solitary fans enter the seaside ride filled with severed heads, torture chambers and other ghoulish delights. Trimper's Haunted House is a vacation staple that has stood in the same location since 1964. But this boardwalk icon is far more than a nostalgic reminder of summers past. The house is an important part of the legacy of Bill Tracy, master of dark rides, those amusement park staples that ferry patrons through interiors where lighting, sound and creative displays are designed to amuse - or terrify.
EXPLORE
October 31, 2011
Every year the Finneran family of Eldersburg invites residents to view their haunted house display, at 6208 Longleaf Pine Road, Eldersburg, and ask that visitors bring canned goods to donate to Carroll County Food Sunday. It's the family's idea of helping the food bank while providing a frightfully good time for friends and neighbors. The display will be open for a special "graveyard walking tour" on Monday, Oct. 31, 6 to 9 p.m.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | October 3, 2011
When most people think of Halloween, images of pumpkins, witches and ghosts usually come to mind. Whether you like to be scared senseless in a haunted house, learn more about true ghost stories or prefer a simple hayride on the farm to pick out pumpkins, there is plenty of fun to be had in Harford County this fall for all ages. For the scariest Halloween fun, be sure to check out Legends of the Fog - Harford County's largest haunted attraction. Located on about 80 acres of Aldino Sod Farm in Aberdeen, Legends of the Fog is open on weekends in October through the first weekend in November.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2010
If running a haunted house is your career goal, it seems best to start young. And it doesn't hurt if you're a little twisted. Allan Bennett, who's spent a decade operating Bennett's Curse (which moved this year from Arundel Mills to Blob's Park in Jessup), insists he was 4 or 5 years old when he started scaring the neighborhood kids. Patrick Barberry, who's been creeping people out with Legends of the Fog in Aberdeen the past four years, was about 8 when a company rented out part of the family farm to set up a haunted hayride — planting a seed that would grow to horrific proportions once Barberry graduated from college in 2006 and decided to use part of the farm for similar grisly purposes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1995
"I love seeing the fright on their faces, especially the ones who come in real cocky with their buddies, trying to show they're not afraid -- then I'm there in their faces, raising my ax . . ."Yeow, and what a face to face!That's legendary hatchet murderess Lizzie Borden, whose features are a fright of frazzled black hair, streaking mascara and blood rivulets on her cheeks that run down beneath the collar of her tattered black dress.Actually, it's Neva Fleming, a mild-mannered emergency medical technician working in her first year of service at the Middle River Volunteer Ambulance Company -- usually helping people.
NEWS
By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 1995
OCTOBER IS the time to set things in order: take a class to energize your mind, organize your house with a fall cleanup or join a physical fitness program to rejuvenate your body.Right now, I'm rejuvenating my body and spirit on the beach at Pawleys Island, S.C. Isn't technology wonderful?Defeating perennial winnerOld Mill High School won round one of the high school math competition at Anne Arundel Community College, defeating the perennial winner, Severna Park High School. Glen Burnie and South River tied for third.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Peter.hermann@baltsun.com | October 27, 2009
The haunted house in Essex is billed as "The House of Screams," but it was the man portraying the Texas Chainsaw Massacre killer who ended up frightened, authorities say, when an off-duty Baltimore police officer pulled his gun and pointed it at the actor during a performance at Eastpoint Mall. Baltimore County officers arrested Southeastern District Sgt. Eric Michael Janik, 36, and charged him early Monday with first- and second-degree assault and reckless endangerment. He was released on $25,000 bail and was suspended by the Baltimore Police Department.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 27, 2009
The Haunting in Connecticut is part of the dreary tradition of "real-life" haunted-house movies, such as The Amityville Horror, instead of the livelier one of make-believe, such as The Innocents or The Haunting or the more recent The Orphanage. Why are the supposedly fact-based "boo movies" so much more plodding and heavy? Instead of milking ambiguity for suspense and terror, these movies proceed with (pardon the expression) dead certainty. If something looks like a ghost and moves like a ghost and smells like a ghost - it is, invariably, a ghost.
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