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NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | July 5, 1992
A few small haulers say their loss of business to Haden Trash Removal won't ruin them or drive up prices to remaining customers.Five Carroll cities and towns decided recently to get a volume discount by giving one hauler all their business -- Haden Trash Removal of Glyndon, which submitted the lowest bid."This isn't going to put us under," said Dixie Hughes of Hughes Trash Removal. "We're going to keep going. It's just a matter of sitting back and reorganizing.""We're still picking up commercial [businesses]
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EXPLORE
October 6, 2011
Maybe a waste transfer station is warranted in the Joppa area where Harford County government is proposing one, or maybe such an operation should be left to someone else to devise. Envisioned for the old Coleman Plecker's World of Golf site on Route 7 near the Route 152 intersection, a waste transfer station could well turn out to be an eyesore at such a spot. The roads in the area are well traveled and the property in question, which the county purchased for $2.9 million, is hardly secluded.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
The Carroll commissioners decided yesterday to reward the lone regular user of the county's septic-waste treatment facility, a hauler who is operating on an expired county Health Department permit.The commissioners agreed that when the septic system of a county-owned building needs to be pumped out, they will steer the business to A. Roy Fringer and Son, Westminster.Commissioner Donald I. Dell proposed that the county government give "consideration" in its business to the hauler who is "the only one using the facility."
EXPLORE
September 25, 2011
Although this year's community clean-up Sept. 10 was two months later than usual, it was another success because of dozens of volunteers. They contributed time and energy, some anonymously. We express a big thank you to all. We filled seven roll-off large metal outdoor trash containers, besides recycling approximately 100 pounds of aluminum, 80 gallons of paint and 30 used tires. First and foremost, I want to thank Councilman Tom Quirk, (and staff members) Pete Kriscumas and Kathy Engers, who not only returned us to Baltimore County's community clean-up program, but came out and got dirty with the rest of us. I also thank Al Nalley, Betty Cain, Harriet Pittman, Phil Schaefer, Frank Shiloh, Lloyd and Cathi Anderson and Telik Johnson.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | December 15, 1991
County Council members refused to vote on a proposed trash recyclingplan Tuesday, saying they want another month to think about a proposed fee haulers would pay to dump trash to be landfilled or burned.The recycling proposal is part of Harford's plan to reduce the wastestream going to landfills. That plan is due to be submitted to the state Department of the Environment Jan. 1."The citizens of Harford County have not had a chance to fully comment on the plan, and the market prices for recycled materials are down," said Robert S. Wagner, R-District E.Wagner's motion to ask the state for an extension until Feb. 4 to submit the plan passed thecouncil, 4-3.Before the vote, Larry Klimovitz, director of administration, warned council members that the county could face stiff penalties for missing the deadline.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
The county commissioners, who balked at spending $40,000 to $50,000 for scales to weigh septic tank wastes for treatment, think they've found a cheaper alternative.The county government has had a septic waste treatment facility ready to open since March at the Westminster sewage treatment plant. But start-up was delayed while the commissioners and staff discussed how to measure the wastes brought in by private haulers. Haulers will be assessed a 9-cent-per-gallon fee.A proposal to scrap the scales in favor of a fee based on septic tank sizes won quick endorsement last week from Commissioners Donald I. Dell and Elmer C. Lippy.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
To keep pace with the costs of trash disposal, the Carroll County commissioners approved yesterday increases in the fees charged at the Northern Landfill. Haulers will pay $54 per ton, an increase of $3. Individual cars will see a 50-cent increase, to $4.50, to dispose of trash. Tipping fees, paid by trash haulers and residents who take refuse to the county's landfill on Route 140 near Westminster, pay the bulk of solid-waste operating costs. The county last increased the fees in 2002.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | March 23, 1998
Subsidiaries of the nation's two largest refuse haulers are competing with a small local company to provide trash service to Taneytown residents.The haulers are Waste Management of Maryland -- Baltimore, a subsidiary of Waste Management Inc. of Oak Brook, Ill., the largest trash hauling company in the United States, and the local subsidiary of Browning-Ferris Industries of Houston, the nation's second-largest refuse hauler. BFI is the city's current trash collector.The companies are competing against Hughes Trash Removal of Hampstead, a family-owned business with five principals and 20 employees, for a three- to five-year contract to serve 1,500 residential customers.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2000
Baltimore failed to collect at least $3.3 million in trash dumping fees last year, much of it because of abuses by small haulers, including dozens from out of state, according to an audit report released yesterday. The audit, by City Comptroller Joan M. Pratt's office, found that small haulers - those using trucks under 7,000 pounds - dumped twice as much trash at the city's Quarantine Road Landfill as was allowed under their permits. The small haulers - those that pay $5 a load, instead of the $60 a ton charged to contract haulers - often exceeded the three-quarters of a ton allowed under the $5 permit, auditors found.
NEWS
December 8, 1992
County government officials hope to set a date this week to open the frequently delayed septic waste treatment facility at the Westminster sewage treatment plant.County planner Helen M. Spinelli said the county commissioners are expected to sign a resolution this week that will cover operating rules for the facility.MA She said notices will be sent to private septic waste haulerswhen an opening date is set.The facility will be operated by city waste water treatment employees. The county government will pay Westminster's costs and then bill private haulers a fee based on usage.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | May 13, 2009
When Gov. Martin O'Malley announced his support for legalized gambling not long after his election, he did so on a Glyndon stud farm beside Tim Porter, whose struggling horse transportation business was extolled as the kind of small business that slots revenues would help preserve. Slot-machine parlors are finally on their way to Maryland, but they won't be Porter's salvation. In March, he declared bankruptcy, losing his 20-year-old business, a Westminster home and modest dreams of economic self-sufficiency.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,Sun reporter | September 28, 2007
The city Health Department has been hit with numerous complaints from Mount Vernon residents who say they are being awakened as early as 4 a.m. by noisy trash trucks operated by a private firm. Angry residents of the historic district have made phone calls and sent e-mail demanding that the city crack down on the trash hauler, Waste Management Inc. City law calls for trash collection in residential areas to occur between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m. Trash collection can take place in business, commercial and industrial areas any time as long as the site is not within 100 feet of a residential structure.
NEWS
by a sun reporter | September 18, 2007
A federal judge sentenced the owner of a waste-hauling firm yesterday to five years of probation and ordered him to pay $55,700 in restitution after abandoning eight trailers full of material containing asbestos on a Severn parking lot. Terrance Yates, 43, of Pasadena, Calif., pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt to falsifying Environmental Protection Agency documents verifying that he had properly dumped the material in an approved site in Pennsylvania, said Marcia Murphy, a spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney's office.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | August 29, 2007
A Harford County legislator is calling for a review of the practice of allowing companies to spread treated sludge from wastewater treatment plants on state-owned parkland. Del. Barry Glassman said he plans to introduce a measure in next year's General Assembly session to establish a task force that would look at leases between the Department of Natural Resources and haulers. "We want to ... review the entire lease process," said Glassman, a Republican who represents District 35A. "The final recommendation could lead to a change in the policy or discontinue it."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 22, 2004
Tired of nightly noise from big trash trucks and clanging metal trash containers at fast-food restaurants and shopping centers, residents of Elkridge and Marriottsville gave up trying to get the attention of commercial trash haulers in favor of a group with much more finely attuned ears - their elected County Council. About two dozen residents came to the council's monthly public hearing in Ellicott City last night to support a bill that would restrict trash haulers' hours to 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. for businesses within 500 feet of a residence.
NEWS
June 13, 2004
A U.S. SUPREME COURT ruling last week is causing some to raise the ominous - but questionable - prospect of thousands of Mexican long-haul trucks belching emissions as they lurch hazardously down U.S. byways. The ruling clears the way for U.S. and Mexican trucks, under the North America Free Trade Agreement, to carry loads into each other's nations - ending one of the last major barriers to fulfilling NAFTA. Trans-border trucking was to begin in the 1990s, but it was held up by the Clinton administration and then by the lawsuit that rode on environmental and safety fears about the older, less-regulated and more-polluting Mexican truck fleet.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | April 21, 1993
Westminster septic hauler Ted Fringer has been the lonely guy at the Westminster Waste Water Treatment Plant, but he may have company soon.Mr. Fringer has been the only Carroll hauler to regularly dump septic waste at a treatment facility that opened in January.Yesterday, the Carroll commissioners voted unanimously to lower the fee to dump at the plant from 9 cents a gallon to 4 cents a gallon, to encourage more haulers to use it."I fought for this," said Mr. Fringer, whose family has operated Fringer Septic Cleaning for three generations.
NEWS
October 10, 1994
Maintaining the current method of trash collection in Carroll County serves the interest of the haulers at the expense of the public. The time has come for the county commissioners to decide whether they will continue to allow small garbage haulers to dictate the county's solid waste collection policy.The evidence is undeniable -- people who don't live in the five Carroll municipalities that have a contract with Waste Management Inc. or in Sykesville, which collects it own trash, pay at least twice as much for their weekly collection.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2004
To keep pace with the costs of trash disposal, the Carroll County commissioners approved yesterday increases in the fees charged at the Northern Landfill. Haulers will pay $54 per ton, an increase of $3. Individual cars will see a 50-cent increase, to $4.50, to dispose of trash. Tipping fees, paid by trash haulers and residents who take refuse to the county's landfill on Route 140 near Westminster, pay the bulk of solid-waste operating costs. The county last increased the fees in 2002.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
Mayor Martin O'Malley's administration defended the operations of the Quarantine Road Landfill yesterday after a city audit released this week criticized the dump for lax fiscal oversight that left cash collections open to theft. The Department of Audits' report said landfill operators ignored its warnings about how cash is handled and that the dump has lost revenues because it has not been charging appropriate fees to small haulers. In addition, the audit criticized the Department of Public Works for waiving such "tipping fees" for certain government agencies that used the South Baltimore landfill.
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