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By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
A Halethorpe man whom police said struck another man in the head 24 times with a hatchet was convicted in Baltimore County Circuit Court Thursday night, according to the state's attorney's office. After a four-day trial, a jury found Larry Eugene Horton, 38, guilty in the death of Ryan Wesley Jackson, 18, whose body was found in Brooklyn Oct. 15. Horton's attorney, Donald C. Wright, said "we're disappointed by the verdict. " Horton had claimed he was acting in self-defense when he said Jackson, who sold him crack cocaine, was there to collect a drug debt.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
A Lansdowne man was sentenced to life without parole in Baltimore County Circuit Court Monday for killing another man by striking him 24 times with a hatchet, according to the state's attorney's office. Larry Eugene Horton, 37 was found guilty in February of killing Ryan Wesley Jackson on Oct. 12, 2011. His sentence was handed down by Judge Jan Marshall Alexander Police said Horton killed Jackson inside his rented home on Rambo Court in Lansdowne before taking Jackson's body to the city.
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NEWS
April 25, 2005
On April 20, 2005, PASTOR DAVID LEE HATCHET, survived by beloved wife Jackie Bostic, two sons Pastor Corey D. Hatchet Sr. and David L. Hatchet, one daughter De'Nika D. Hatchet, two daughters-in-law, Tonya and Tamika Hatchet, five grandchildren and a host of other family and friends. Family will receive friends Monday 6 to 8 P.M. at the Wylie Funeral Home, P.A., of Baltimore County, 9200 LIberty Rd. Services will be held Tuesday at Greater New Hope Baptist Church, 2720 W. North Avenue, 11 A.M. Funeral 11:30 A.M. Interment following.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
A Halethorpe man whom police said struck another man in the head 24 times with a hatchet was convicted in Baltimore County Circuit Court Thursday night, according to the state's attorney's office. After a four-day trial, a jury found Larry Eugene Horton, 38, guilty in the death of Ryan Wesley Jackson, 18, whose body was found in Brooklyn Oct. 15. Horton's attorney, Donald C. Wright, said "we're disappointed by the verdict. " Horton had claimed he was acting in self-defense when he said Jackson, who sold him crack cocaine, was there to collect a drug debt.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
A Lansdowne man was sentenced to life without parole in Baltimore County Circuit Court Monday for killing another man by striking him 24 times with a hatchet, according to the state's attorney's office. Larry Eugene Horton, 37 was found guilty in February of killing Ryan Wesley Jackson on Oct. 12, 2011. His sentence was handed down by Judge Jan Marshall Alexander Police said Horton killed Jackson inside his rented home on Rambo Court in Lansdowne before taking Jackson's body to the city.
NEWS
May 27, 1992
During his four years as chairman of the Tennessee Valley Authority, Marvin T. Runyon Jr. earned the nickname "Carvin' Marvin" for hacking away at the federally owned electric utility's vast bureaucracy. By the time he was finished, 14,000 of TVA's 35,000 workers had been discharged. Now that the 70-year-old Mr. Runyon has been named postmaster general, does the same fate await the U.S. Postal Service?Mr. Runyon may not be the postal hatchet man that some fear. For one thing, the groundwork has already been laid for a gradual downsizing of the huge postal bureaucracy (work force: 750,000)
EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
It appears that much of the skepticism with the Symphony Woods Inner Arbor plan, brought to light by Columbia resident Michael McCall and introduced by CA, is more about process and hurt feelings than the actual plan. Utilizing a theme creatively embracing the arts, the Inner Arbor plan is a big concept in a town where development is based on careful small steps often kept in check by a vocal minority. While issues may be within some facets of the new plan as currently envisioned, the largeness of the concept has created the conversation needed.  Much of that opinion however appears to be about the process, CA and prior plans instead of this plan's potential to help invigorate a downtown currently ill-defined by a large mall and a sleepy lakefront.  One has to wonder how this plan would be received if it were championed and submitted by another organization. Is much of the gnashing of teeth more to do with opinions of CA and the process?
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1994
A homeless man with a hatchet critically injured another man yesterday during an argument in front of Lexington Market, then led police on a foot chase before he was arrested, authorities said.The victim, Donald Adams, 32, of the 700 block of Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. suffered a deep wound to his left jaw and throat in the 8 a.m. attack, police said.He was listed in critical condition yesterday at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center.From the market, in the 200 block of N. Eutaw St., police chased the suspect east on Lexington Street, south on Howard Street and east on Marion Street, a streetbehind the Greyhound bus station, where he was arrested.
NEWS
By Jay Merwinand William B. Talbott and Jay Merwinand William B. Talbott,Evening Sun Staff | October 3, 1990
A woman who was charged with using a hatchet to nearly sever a man's hand was released from jail last night after posting $15,000 bail, police said.Police said no trial date has been set for Geraldine Jackson, 44, of the 1700 block of W. Lanvale St., who was arrested yesterday afternoon and charged with assault with intent to maim and assault with a deadly weapon.Jackson, police said, used a hatchet to attempt to hack off the arm of a man she believed had sexually molested her granddaughter, 5. The injured man was identified by police as Wardell Leverette, 47, of the 1900 block of N. Bentalou St. He was in serious condition today at University of Maryland Medical Center with a severe cut to his left wrist and other cuts to his left shoulder and left cheek.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | July 6, 1994
A man with a hatchet critically injured another man today during an argument in front of the Lexington Market in the 200 block of North Eutaw Street, then, still holding the weapon, led police on a foot chase along three city streets before being arrested, authorities said.The victim, whose identity police had not been able to establish by late morning, suffered a deep wound to the right side of his neck and a bruise to his head in the 8 a.m. attack, police said. He was taken by ambulance to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was listed in critical condition.
EXPLORE
February 4, 2013
It appears that much of the skepticism with the Symphony Woods Inner Arbor plan, brought to light by Columbia resident Michael McCall and introduced by CA, is more about process and hurt feelings than the actual plan. Utilizing a theme creatively embracing the arts, the Inner Arbor plan is a big concept in a town where development is based on careful small steps often kept in check by a vocal minority. While issues may be within some facets of the new plan as currently envisioned, the largeness of the concept has created the conversation needed.  Much of that opinion however appears to be about the process, CA and prior plans instead of this plan's potential to help invigorate a downtown currently ill-defined by a large mall and a sleepy lakefront.  One has to wonder how this plan would be received if it were championed and submitted by another organization. Is much of the gnashing of teeth more to do with opinions of CA and the process?
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
Davey Johnson hadn't owned a home in more than a decade. But soon after being hired by the Orioles in 1995, he defied baseball managers' conventional logic by buying - rather than renting - a ranch house on the north side of Loch Raven Reservoir. It was the sort of decision he would never make in a game - allowing his heart to triumph over his head - but Johnson was as smitten with the Orioles franchise from his playing days as he was with the Baltimore County property, which had a pool, a stream and plenty of rustic charm.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
I see Susan Reimer was in good form Monday in her hatchet job on Newt Gingrich ("Family-values blackmail in Iowa," Dec. 19). While asserting that Mr. Gingrich, a Republican candidate for the presidency, "committed adultery during his first two marriages," she failed to mention that two fairly recent Democratic presidents were guilty of that same offense. She also seemed to be critical of those opposed to having men and women in the military "sleeping under the same roof.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
A 37-year-old Lansdowne man was arrested Wednesday in Alabama and charged in the death of an 18-year-old in Baltimore County, county police said Thursday. Larry Horton faces charges of first-degree murder in the killing of Ryan Wesley Jackson, who police say was killed with a hatchet and found in a remote, wooded area of Curtis Bay on Saturday afternoon. Jackson had last been seen Oct. 12, when he told his girlfriend that he was going to a home in the 700 block of Rambo Court.
NEWS
October 4, 2010
The Sun does everything it can to demonize, denigrate, misrepresent or in many cases conveniently (for The Sun) ignore those of us who proudly proclaim ourselves Conservatives. Your recent editorial ("One nation," Oct. 2) is a good example of this proclivity on the part of The Sun to do a hatchet job on people opposed to The Sun's radical agenda. Among the many "bad mouth" references to the tea party in the Oct. 2 editorial are such words and phrases as: "...the tea party's fat-cat corporate sponsors.
NEWS
September 27, 2010
Uh oh, another hate-filled hatchet job on a female Republican politician by Sun columnist Susan Reimer ("Please, no more flaky female candidates," Sept. 27). Actually, she spewed her venom on two such ladies, Christine O'Donnell and Sarah Palin, for whom she seems to have a visceral hatred. In a Sept. 2, 2008 column ("A woman — but why this woman?") Ms. Reimer characterized Ms. Palin as an "utterly unqualified woman," which is akin to what she wrote about Ms. O'Donnell in her recent column: "Please God. Not another ditz with baggage and a loopy belief system.
NEWS
June 26, 1995
Some might consider the ceremonial burying of the hatchet at Lehigh Portland Cement Co.'s Union Bridge plant a week ago a bit contrived. However, if the plant's management and employees can turn a symbolic act into one of substance and meaning, Carroll County residents may witness a complete turnabout in Lehigh's past decade of nasty labor relations.Last Monday's mock funeral is actually in keeping with an international growth in ritual "meaculpas." In early April, 800 German Christians traveled to the Netherlands and apologized for the World War II invasion.
NEWS
June 15, 2000
An interview with Tom Neary, young-adult contact person at the Savage branch of the Howard County Library and a leader of the Go Girl Book Club. Go Girl is a reading group for girls ages 10 to 13 and their mothers. Children's librarian Susan Maranto is also a leader of the group. What book are members reading this month? We're reading "Hatchet" by Gary Paulson. Which books have members liked? I think "A Wrinkle in Time" by Madeleine L'Engle was their favorite one so far. There were a lot of unusual characters.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2010
Thirty-four years after he was shot by Baltimore police for swinging a hatchet at an officer, a 62-year-old city man has died as a result of his wounds, according to police and the medical examiner's office. Police said James Cornelius Watkins died March 12 at Northwest Hospital Center from sepsis. He had been paralyzed and held at a care facility since he was shot Dec. 3, 1975, after escaping from a prison work crew and committing a home invasion. According to reports from the time, he lunged at an officer and was shot in the chest.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Liz Bowie and Timothy B. Wheeler and Liz Bowie,SUN REPORTERS | February 5, 2008
Gov. Martin O'Malley abruptly abandoned his effort to force out state schools Superintendent Nancy S. Grasmick yesterday, appearing with her at the State House to announce that they had agreed to bury their differences and work together on education policy. Sitting down beside Grasmick to face reporters, O'Malley said he had asked legislative leaders not to pursue a bill that would have effectively nullified the State Board of Education's recent renewal of her contract. Some legislative leaders said last week that it was unclear whether there was sufficient support in the General Assembly for an effort to force Grasmick out, suggesting that even if O'Malley succeeded in replacing her, he probably would have had to use a great deal of political capital to do so. Grasmick also agreed yesterday to pursue several of O'Malley's educational priorities that she had not previously embraced.
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