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NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
Encouraged by their preliminary success at raising blue crabs in the laboratory, a group of Maryland and Virginia scientists plans an experimental release of hatchery-raised crabs in Chesapeake Bay tributaries as early as this summer. The scientists hope to find out whether rivers and creeks that don't seem to have many crabs can support them. If the test with about 40,000 young crabs works, it could be a first step toward trying to supplement the bay's hard-pressed crab population through captive breeding.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 4, 2008
Albert Powell raised a big, fat rainbow trout. Charlie Gougeon put that fish in the Little Gunpowder River. Chris Shaw reeled it in. His dad, Robert, enjoyed a nice trout dinner. How's that for chain of custody? It's not often in telling the story of a noteworthy catch - and I've passed along a bunch to you - that one can say with a great degree of certainty how a specific fish arrived at the end of a particular hook and then to a single plate. So, indulge me this one time. Because this is not only a story of how Shaw acquired his bragging rights, but also a story of the extraordinary work done by the biologists and field staff at the Maryland Fisheries Service.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,sun reporter | March 13, 2007
CAMBRIDGE -- Gov. Martin O'Malley spent yesterday afternoon peering into tanks filled with spawning oysters, part of an effort to learn what the state can do to help bring back the struggling species. O'Malley led an entourage of suit-clad politicians through the concrete corridors at the University of Maryland's Horn Point hatchery, all the way asking the scientists who work there why the Chesapeake Bay's native oyster population became so scarce and how they can be revived. It was Oysters 101, Horn Point-style, with hatchery manager Donald W. "Mutt" Meritt leading the tour and offering frank assessments of the oysters' health.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | May 7, 2007
In a basement laboratory tucked amid the tourist attractions of Baltimore's Inner Harbor, two Israeli-born scientists are unlocking the mysteries of the Chesapeake Bay blue crab. Over the past five years, Yonathan Zohar and Odi Zmora have spent most of their waking hours poring over tanks filled with the snapping crustaceans and their tiny offspring at a University of Maryland lab on Pratt Street. They feed the crabs homemade algae tailored to their life stage. The researchers control the water temperature, light and salinity, and document the crustaceans' every move as they shed their shells, mate and reproduce.
NEWS
July 7, 2001
LEARNING more about the Chesapeake Bay's blue crab ought to be a goal that everyone supports. So, federal money for a project to hatch the crustaceans in the laboratory and release them in the bay for closer study shouldn't be controversial. It is so only because of unrealistic dreams that lab-grown blue crabs can replenish and restore the declining natural fishery of the bay. And that feeds resistance to limits on crab harvesting that are needed now to protect the future of this vital resource.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 15, 2000
The Queen Anne's County Board of Appeals has rejected a Baltimore County trash company's application to operate a rubble fill in a 58-acre soybean field south of Millington and uphill from Unicorn Lake, the only warm-water fish hatchery on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | March 23, 2007
ACCIDENT -- Mark Harmon remembers the first hint of something funny with the trout at the state's Bear Creek hatchery in Western Maryland. The fish were swimming in circles. "You ever see a puppy chasing its tail? That's what they looked like," said Harmon, the hatchery's assistant manager. As it turns out, the fishes' spines and skulls were being deformed by a deadly parasite called Myxobolus cerebralis. The microscopic species causes an infection known as "whirling disease" that has decimated trout populations in Colorado, Montana and other Western states.
SPORTS
February 18, 1993
HATCHERY DONATIONThe Maryland Charter Boat Association has donated a new hatchery tank trailer for use by the Department of NaturalResources Tidewater Administration.The trailer will accommodate both circular and rectangular tanks, which will be used to transport striped bass fingerlings and brood stock to natal waters and stocking sites.tight budgetary times, when expenses such as vehicles are being cut, the presentation of a new hatchery tank trailer from the Charter Boat Association comes as a welcome addition to the fisheries stocking program," DNR Secretary Torrey C. Brown said earlier this week.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | July 10, 1994
Maryland's stocking of largemouth bass in tidal waters this year was directed toward upper bay tributaries and rivers on the Eastern Shore, with some 260,000 fingerlings raised and released this spring.The Department of Natural Resources uses its Unicorn Lake Fish Hatchery in Queen Anne's County to spawn adult bass taken from tidal waters, then allows the newborns to develop in a sympathetic environment."Fish hatcheries are needed to provide more bass for tidal waters," said DNR Secretary Torrey C. Brown, "because many more young bass are able to survive in the hatchery ponds than in the wild."
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | May 4, 2008
Albert Powell raised a big, fat rainbow trout. Charlie Gougeon put that fish in the Little Gunpowder River. Chris Shaw reeled it in. His dad, Robert, enjoyed a nice trout dinner. How's that for chain of custody? It's not often in telling the story of a noteworthy catch - and I've passed along a bunch to you - that one can say with a great degree of certainty how a specific fish arrived at the end of a particular hook and then to a single plate. So, indulge me this one time. Because this is not only a story of how Shaw acquired his bragging rights, but also a story of the extraordinary work done by the biologists and field staff at the Maryland Fisheries Service.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | March 23, 2007
ACCIDENT -- Mark Harmon remembers the first hint of something funny with the trout at the state's Bear Creek hatchery in Western Maryland. The fish were swimming in circles. "You ever see a puppy chasing its tail? That's what they looked like," said Harmon, the hatchery's assistant manager. As it turns out, the fishes' spines and skulls were being deformed by a deadly parasite called Myxobolus cerebralis. The microscopic species causes an infection known as "whirling disease" that has decimated trout populations in Colorado, Montana and other Western states.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,sun reporter | March 13, 2007
CAMBRIDGE -- Gov. Martin O'Malley spent yesterday afternoon peering into tanks filled with spawning oysters, part of an effort to learn what the state can do to help bring back the struggling species. O'Malley led an entourage of suit-clad politicians through the concrete corridors at the University of Maryland's Horn Point hatchery, all the way asking the scientists who work there why the Chesapeake Bay's native oyster population became so scarce and how they can be revived. It was Oysters 101, Horn Point-style, with hatchery manager Donald W. "Mutt" Meritt leading the tour and offering frank assessments of the oysters' health.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | February 15, 2007
A parasite that deforms the spines and skulls of trout - making them swim in circles often until they die - has infected 80,000 fish in two hatcheries in Western Maryland, state officials said yesterday. The "whirling disease," which has devastated trout populations in Western states, has also been found downstream from the two Maryland hatcheries, in the North Branch of the Potomac River, said Bob Lunsford, director of freshwater fisheries for Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
The earthy growl of the big tank truck that creeps along back roads beckons Maryland's 56,000 trout fishermen the way the cheery jingle of an ice cream truck calls to kids. Sloshing around in the tank's cold recesses are springtime treats: dark, glistening brown trout; silver, speckled rainbows; and a sunflower-yellow variety that makes the surrounding water glitter. In an annual ritual that precedes the opening of trout season March 25, hundreds of thousands of plump, wiggling fish raised in hatcheries are being trucked to streams and lakes around the state and turned loose.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 3, 2005
NO DISRESPECT to those fishing for them this spring, but hatchery trout are inferior to wild trout. It's not that wild trout taste better or look prettier (both true) or that wild trout are bigger than hatchery trout (usually not true). For me, it's what the wild trout represents that makes it superior. It represents something precious in this overdeveloped, polluted and trash-strewn world, a bit of paradise regained. Wild trout represent victory, hatchery trout defeat. And, when it comes to preserving or restoring natural resources, we should be more about achieving victory than conceding defeat.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2002
REPLENISHING nature" was the headline on a recent Washington newspaper article. The article - how researchers are releasing hatchery-raised blue crabs into the bay - probably sounded a hopeful note to most readers. My first thought was more like, "Uh-oh, here we go again." "If [hatcheries] worked for the rockfish, I figured it was worth checking to see if it could be done with crabs," the article quoted Del. C. Richard D'Amato, an Anne Arundel County Democrat, as saying. The fact is, hatcheries didn't work for the rockfish.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 3, 2005
NO DISRESPECT to those fishing for them this spring, but hatchery trout are inferior to wild trout. It's not that wild trout taste better or look prettier (both true) or that wild trout are bigger than hatchery trout (usually not true). For me, it's what the wild trout represents that makes it superior. It represents something precious in this overdeveloped, polluted and trash-strewn world, a bit of paradise regained. Wild trout represent victory, hatchery trout defeat. And, when it comes to preserving or restoring natural resources, we should be more about achieving victory than conceding defeat.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | May 30, 1999
Last week, as he completed the last few days of a 35-year career with the Department of Natural Resources, Ben Florence was recalling his early days with the Fisheries Service."
FEATURES
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2002
CLARIFICATION An article in the Today section yesterday said the organization in charge of the work at a crab biology project at the Inner Harbor has an affiliation with the University of Maryland. It should have been identified as a project at the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute. Introducing the cultivated crustacean: well-bred, well-nourished, well-mannered; tender to its mate, a gentleman among its fellows. Reared in the most exquisite soup. Housed in high-rise apartments.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2002
Encouraged by their preliminary success at raising blue crabs in the laboratory, a group of Maryland and Virginia scientists plans an experimental release of hatchery-raised crabs in Chesapeake Bay tributaries as early as this summer. The scientists hope to find out whether rivers and creeks that don't seem to have many crabs can support them. If the test with about 40,000 young crabs works, it could be a first step toward trying to supplement the bay's hard-pressed crab population through captive breeding.
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