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NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | April 28, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. John Glenn chided a colleagu yesterday for "delaying tactics" aimed at preventing passage of the Hatch Act reform bill."I think this is just delay for delay's sake," said a visibly annoyed Mr. Glenn, D-Ohio.He was referring to a letter yesterday morning from Delaware Republican Sen. William Roth.The letter requested another hearing on reform legislation that would allow federal workers to participate in some political activities.This bill has been argued "ad nauseam" in committee and on the floor of both chambers for several years, said Mr. Glenn, who chairs the Governmental Affairs Committee, which is handling the bill.
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NEWS
January 29, 2013
The lawyers of Anne Arundel County Executive John Leopold concede that he used poor judgment ("Leopold not guilty on one misconduct count," Jan. 25). The same could be said of embezzlers, identity thieves and other convicted criminals. The use of public employees for personal tasks by an elected official is no less a theft than any other white collar crime and should be treated as such in the courts. At the very least, Mr. Leopold should be fined and required to reimburse the taxpayers for the time of county employees in his protection detail and any other public employees used to conduct political activities - such as distributing his campaign signage and driving him around while he tore down his opponents' signs while on the public clock!
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NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | August 2, 1993
Washington. -- To President Clinton's criticism of Congress as dilatory and indecisive, a reasonable response is: Would that it were. Congress is decisively ''reforming'' the Hatch Act, and this is part of a pattern of Congress acting boldly concerning what it cares about most. And what is that? Read on.The New Deal radically quickened the permeation of life by politics, expanding federal power and the potential for abuse thereof. The 1938 elections produced a Congress made more conservative by the electorate's repudiation of Roosevelt's desire to ''pack'' (by expanding)
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2013
Even as Congress and the White House appeared to be at a standoff over the fiscal cliff last month, lawmakers and the president were able to agree on at least one thing: an update of the Hatch Act. The 1939 law prohibits federal employees and certain state and local workers from engaging in partisan political activity on the taxpayer's dime. Violators typically have faced two types of penalties - both severe. Congress passed bipartisan legislation in December that broadened the range of penalties and loosened the rules so that most state and local government workers - including those in the District of Columbia - can run for partisan elective office.
NEWS
By Adrien Seybert and Adrien Seybert,States News Service | March 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The Senate is poised to eliminate barriers preventing an estimated 3 million federal workers from fully exercising their political freedoms.Congress prohibited workers from engaging in partisan political activities when the Hatch Act was enacted in 1939. The statute grew out of fear that selecting public servants on the basis of their political affiliation rather than merit was undermining the development of the professional civil service.The Senate Governmental Affairs Committee yesterday approved the measure that would allow federal employees to actively participate in political campaigns during their hours away from work.
NEWS
By Ned Martel and Ned Martel,States News Service The New York Times contributed to this article | July 14, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Senate began yesterday its attempt to change the Hatch Act, a 54-year-old law that restricts the activities of federal workers in political campaigns.But the floor debate on the bill, which could stretch into next week, could attract amendments on two controversial issues that have no connection to Hatch Act change.Two Republican senators are rumored to be planning to introduce amendments that would preserve the ban on gays in the military and renew a patent for an insignia that includes a Confederate flag.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times Nelson Schwartz of the Washington Bureau contributed to this article | September 22, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Relaxing a law that has been in effect for more than 50 years, the House gave final congressional approval yesterday to a bill that would allow most federal employees to take part in partisan politics on their own time.With some exceptions, federal employees would be permitted to hold office in a political party, be a delegate to a party nominating convention or take an active role in running a political campaign.Even under the revisions to the 1939 Hatch Act, however, federal employees would not be permitted to run for office in partisan elections or raise political funds from the general public.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 8, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Another victim of the gridlock of split responsibility between a Republican president and a Democratic Congress appears certain to be broken in light of the overwhelming House vote to revise the Hatch Act.With a Democrat in the White House for the first time in 12 years, the long fight to repeal the law barring most political participation by federal employees is expected to sail through the Senate and be signed by President Clinton later this...
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green and David Nitkin and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2005
Maryland commuter rail chief Phillip D. Bissett is considering how to respond to a legal opinion on whether his campaign for Anne Arundel county executive puts him in violation of a law prohibiting political activity by government employees who oversee federal funds. Bissett received an opinion "within the past day" from the U.S. Office of Special Counsel, which administers the federal Hatch Act, a ban on political activity by some government workers, his campaign manager, Diane M. Rey, said yesterday.
NEWS
June 11, 2006
Livesay accused of conflict of interest The Hatch Act is a provision of federal law that prohibits those who apply for and supervise federal funds from seeking office in a partisan election. Wayne Livesay filed to run for Howard County Council on Feb. 22 and then actively campaigned for the seat while Chief of Police. As such, I believe from that moment Mr. Livesay was in violation of the Hatch Act. The Sun reported, "According to the opinion [by the U.S. Office of Special Counsel], Livesay's signature on current federal grant applications and his supervision of their implementation means he is covered by the Hatch Act."
NEWS
By Melissa Harris | March 23, 2007
Workers reminded to keep politics out of the office With presidential primary campaigns gaining steam, the office responsible for keeping political activity out of the federal workplace is warning employees that e-mails for or against a candidate are prohibited while on the job. Last week, Special Counsel Scott Bloch rescinded a 2002 advisory opinion stating that the Hatch Act did not prohibit "water-cooler"-type exchanges of opinion e-mailed among co-workers,...
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS | June 23, 2006
This week, a three-member board responsible for keeping the civil service free of political activity revived complaints against two former Social Security Administration employees who, during the 2004 presidential campaign, forwarded e-mails while at work revealing their allegiances. The question is how far federal workers can go in expressing their views during work hours and on government computers. It also questions whether those expressions meet the definition of "electronic leafleting" or "electioneering," which are banned under the Hatch Act. The two employees worked in the Social Security regional office in Kansas City, Mo. The first e-mail, from Leslye Sims, who now works for the Federal Aviation Administration, was titled "FW: Fwd: Fw: Why I am Supporting John Kerry for President?"
NEWS
June 11, 2006
Livesay accused of conflict of interest The Hatch Act is a provision of federal law that prohibits those who apply for and supervise federal funds from seeking office in a partisan election. Wayne Livesay filed to run for Howard County Council on Feb. 22 and then actively campaigned for the seat while Chief of Police. As such, I believe from that moment Mr. Livesay was in violation of the Hatch Act. The Sun reported, "According to the opinion [by the U.S. Office of Special Counsel], Livesay's signature on current federal grant applications and his supervision of their implementation means he is covered by the Hatch Act."
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON and LARRY CARSON,SUN REPORTER | May 20, 2006
Howard County's longest-serving police chief, Wayne Livesay, will retire May 31 after more than eight years in command to devote himself full time to running for County Council, he said yesterday -- the same day he received a legal opinion saying he would have to resign to avoid violating federal law. "I was up all night last night, because I knew today was coming. It's been a rough couple days [emotionally]. This has been my life," he said. Livesay, 54, who joined the Howard force more than 34 years ago, said he had decided on his last day months ago but announced it shortly after receiving word from the U.S. Office of Special Counsel that he must resign by June 2 or be in violation of the Hatch Act, which bars political activity by federal employees.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2005
USUALLY, WHEN reporters call an aspiring politician with just $400 in the war chest, the candidate is eager to slam the opposing party and boast about his professional contacts - that is, unless the candidate is a federal employee. Gilbert Renaut, 58, a community leader and lawyer at the Department of Energy, is running for mayor of Annapolis - as an independent. And his day job is certainly cramping his campaign style. When reached at work, Renaut could not take the call. The Hatch Act prohibits him from campaigning on government time.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 5, 2005
Gregory V. Nourse, an assistant superintendent for the Anne Arundel County school system, said yesterday that he plans to run for county executive next year. Nourse, 56, joins state Del. John R. Leopold and former state Del. Phillip D. Bissett as Republicans expected to run for the seat now held by Democrat Janet S. Owens, who cannot run for a third term because of term limits. At least three Democrats are also considering bids. Nourse said he will file as a candidate with the state next week.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 5, 2005
Gregory V. Nourse, an assistant superintendent for the Anne Arundel County school system, said yesterday that he plans to run for county executive next year. Nourse, 56, joins state Del. John R. Leopold and former state Del. Phillip D. Bissett as Republicans expected to run for the seat now held by Democrat Janet S. Owens, who cannot run for a third term because of term limits. At least three Democrats are also considering bids. Nourse said he will file as a candidate with the state next week.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 21, 2005
Ehrlich administration official Dilip Paliath's run for the state Senate does not violate a law prohibiting partisan electioneering by state government employees who administer federal funds, according to an advisory opinion the candidate released yesterday. Paliath, who is counsel to the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention, requested the opinion after another official in Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s administration, Phillip D. Bissett, resigned as commuter rail chief so that his campaign for Anne Arundel County executive would not run afoul of the federal Hatch Act. Erica N. Stern, an attorney in the Hatch Act Unit of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel, wrote June 8 that because Paliath's job duties deal with state legislative and policy issues - not the federal grants the crime control office administers - the Hatch Act doesn't apply to him. Paliath is seeking the Republican nomination in the Towson-area 42nd District, which is represented by Sen. James Brochin, a Democrat.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 21, 2005
Ehrlich administration official Dilip Paliath's run for the state Senate does not violate a law prohibiting partisan electioneering by state government employees who administer federal funds, according to an advisory opinion the candidate released yesterday. Paliath, who is counsel to the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention, requested the opinion after another official in Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s administration, Phillip D. Bissett, resigned as commuter rail chief so that his campaign for Anne Arundel County executive would not run afoul of the federal Hatch Act. Erica N. Stern, an attorney in the Hatch Act Unit of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel, wrote June 8 that because Paliath's job duties deal with state legislative and policy issues - not the federal grants the crime control office administers - the Hatch Act doesn't apply to him. Paliath is seeking the Republican nomination in the Towson-area 42nd District, which is represented by Sen. James Brochin, a Democrat.
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