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NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 19, 1994
TOKYO -- The technology revolution Japan has done so much to spawn is finally being used to reach the country's leader.Beginning a week ago, anyone wanting to get through to the new prime minister, Tsutomu Hata, can send a fax to 8133-581-3883.This may seem a petty move compared to the long-standing use of letters and faxes to reach elected officials in the United States. One can even send an E-Mail message to the President Clinton's computer mail box.But in Japan, letters to politicians tend to end up in the garbage, while the high-tech communication methods that Japan sells abroad are ignored at home.
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NEWS
June 29, 1994
In good times, Japan does not need political leadership. The civil service makes everything work. But Japan is in economic crisis, trying to get out of recession and regain prosperity so Japanese can buy imports and mute American criticism. Japan is facing a run by world money managers from a weak dollar into a stronger yen, making Japanese products expensive to export. Unless action is taken and confidence regained, Japan's recovery will halt. For that, the Japanese do need a government.
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NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | June 24, 1993
TOKYO -- Remember the agriculture minister who said Japan couldn't import more U.S. beef because "Japanese have longer intestines than Americans" and find the stuff hard to digest?Don't laugh.Yesterday, the author of that much-ridiculed 1987 remark became the head of Japan's fastest-rising new political party.He says he wants to "reform" Japan's politics, give the country's long-suffering consumers a better break and take a bolder role in world affairs.Since leading the rebellion that brought down Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's government in a no-confidence vote last Friday, former Finance Minister Tsutomu Hata, 57, has become the heavy favorite for prime minister if a coalition government ends 38 years of rule by the Liberal Democratic Party in next month's parliamentary election.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | June 26, 1994
TOKYO -- Within hours of the sudden resignation of Japan's government yesterday, political factions began maneuvering to gain control.But with no group holding a decisive hand and deep-seated animosities spread throughout parliament, there was little certainty about who might emerge on top or how long the process might take. The formal business of choosing a leader will begin tomorrow and end -- whenever.In the meantime, there appears to be little interest or will on the part of the Japanese politicians to confront the problems facing the country.
BUSINESS
By Tak Kumakura and Tak Kumakura,Bloomberg Business News | August 19, 1992
TOKYO -- Japanese Finance Minister Tsutomu Hata said yesterday that his ministry will discourage banks from selling stocks to generate cash, allow financial institutions to raise dividend payout ratios and take other small steps to support Japan's plunging financial markets.Analysts said the government appeared to recognize the severity of the current market crisis but added that the measures announced yesterday were insufficient to save the market from further declines. The benchmark Nikkei 225 stock average fell 4.15 percent yesterday to a six-year low of 14,309.
NEWS
May 1, 1994
The United States is unlikely to get help from Japan in pressing North Korea to abandon the quest for nuclear weaponry. Washington cannot realistically expect agreement soon on measures to end Japan's huge trade surplus with the U.S.Either of these would require a Japanese government strong enough to fend off domestic pressures and civil service inertia against doing any such thing. The government formed with the former foreign minister, Tsutomu Hata, as prime minister is the weakest imaginable, subject to journalistic and political ridicule from birth.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | June 25, 1994
TOKYO -- The third Japanese government in less than a year fell this morning, resigning minutes before almost certainrejection in a parliamentary no-confidence vote.The abrupt end to the 2-month-old administration of Tsutomu Hata merely continued the chaos that has characterized Japanese politics since last summer.The collapse comes as a potential crisis lurks just a few hundred miles away in Korea that, were it to erupt, would require numerous political decisions by the Japanese government -- including changes in law to permit full assistance for U.S. military operations.
NEWS
By Sam Jameson and Sam Jameson,Los Angeles Times | August 4, 1993
TOKYO -- Japan's next government should clearly apologize for World War II and "inform our children what their forefathers did in the past," Tsutomu Hata, who is expected to become the country's deputy prime minister, said yesterday.Such action is needed, he said, to end constant foreign demands for apologies and continuing suspicion that Japan is bent on seeking military dominance again in Asia.Mr. Hata, 57, is a leading figure in the eight-party coalition that is expected to begin governing Japan when Parliament elects a prime minister tomorrow.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 8, 1994
TOKYO -- A former Imperial Army officer who served a little more than a week as Japan's justice minister was dismissed yesterday, three days after he provoked protests throughout Asia by declaring that one of the biggest massacres of World War II, the "Rape of Nanking," was a "fabrication."Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata asked the justice minister, Shigeto Nagano, for his resignation as Japan tried to quell growing outrage all over Asia over the remarks."The bad effects caused in neighboring countries has reached a worrisome stage," Mr. Hata reportedly said, according to Japanese news accounts.
NEWS
June 29, 1994
In good times, Japan does not need political leadership. The civil service makes everything work. But Japan is in economic crisis, trying to get out of recession and regain prosperity so Japanese can buy imports and mute American criticism. Japan is facing a run by world money managers from a weak dollar into a stronger yen, making Japanese products expensive to export. Unless action is taken and confidence regained, Japan's recovery will halt. For that, the Japanese do need a government.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | June 25, 1994
TOKYO -- The third Japanese government in less than a year fell this morning, resigning minutes before almost certainrejection in a parliamentary no-confidence vote.The abrupt end to the 2-month-old administration of Tsutomu Hata merely continued the chaos that has characterized Japanese politics since last summer.The collapse comes as a potential crisis lurks just a few hundred miles away in Korea that, were it to erupt, would require numerous political decisions by the Japanese government -- including changes in law to permit full assistance for U.S. military operations.
BUSINESS
By Los Angeles Times | May 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Against the troubling backdrop of a still-growing U.S. trade deficit with Japan, U.S. and Japanese representatives broke three months of near silence yesterday and resumed efforts to negotiate greater access to Japanese markets.Monthly figures from the Commerce Department showed the overall U.S. trade deficit narrowed greatly in March, by 18.5 percent, to $7.46 billion. But the imbalance with Japan grew by 25.4 percent, to its third highest monthly level, $5.8 billion.As the report was being released, emissaries from the new Japanese government of Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata were sitting down in the offices of the U.S. Trade Representative, trying to re-establish the talks that were broken off Feb. 11 when U.S. and Japanese officials were unable to agree on a plan to open the Japanese market in four crucial economic sectors.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 19, 1994
TOKYO -- The technology revolution Japan has done so much to spawn is finally being used to reach the country's leader.Beginning a week ago, anyone wanting to get through to the new prime minister, Tsutomu Hata, can send a fax to 8133-581-3883.This may seem a petty move compared to the long-standing use of letters and faxes to reach elected officials in the United States. One can even send an E-Mail message to the President Clinton's computer mail box.But in Japan, letters to politicians tend to end up in the garbage, while the high-tech communication methods that Japan sells abroad are ignored at home.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 8, 1994
TOKYO -- A former Imperial Army officer who served a little more than a week as Japan's justice minister was dismissed yesterday, three days after he provoked protests throughout Asia by declaring that one of the biggest massacres of World War II, the "Rape of Nanking," was a "fabrication."Prime Minister Tsutomu Hata asked the justice minister, Shigeto Nagano, for his resignation as Japan tried to quell growing outrage all over Asia over the remarks."The bad effects caused in neighboring countries has reached a worrisome stage," Mr. Hata reportedly said, according to Japanese news accounts.
NEWS
May 1, 1994
The United States is unlikely to get help from Japan in pressing North Korea to abandon the quest for nuclear weaponry. Washington cannot realistically expect agreement soon on measures to end Japan's huge trade surplus with the U.S.Either of these would require a Japanese government strong enough to fend off domestic pressures and civil service inertia against doing any such thing. The government formed with the former foreign minister, Tsutomu Hata, as prime minister is the weakest imaginable, subject to journalistic and political ridicule from birth.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 29, 1994
TOKYO -- After a long and chaotic gestation, a new Japanese government emerged yesterday -- opposed by many, lacking sufficient internal support, but nonetheless finally alive.Japan's version of the White House, the Prime Minister's Residence, has been empty since early April, when Morihiro Hosokawa announced his resignation. In recent days, as the imbroglio of constituting an administration deepened, reporters actually pitched tents outside the residence, adding to the circus-like atmosphere that has transformed traditionally dull Japanese politics into national fascination and entertainment.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | June 23, 1993
TOKYO -- Rebellion among Japan's governing Liberal Democrats spread to the parliament's upper house yesterday, as eight members of that chamber joined 35 lower house representatives in a mass resignation from the splintering party.Yesterday's resignations brought to 53 the number of members of the Diet, Japan's parliament, who have formally left the LDP since last Friday, when former Finance Minister Tsutomu Hata led rebel LDP members in joining opposition parties to pull off a vote of no confidence in Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's Cabinet.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 20, 1994
TOKYO -- A complex, two-week struggle for the leadership of Japan appeared at an end yesterday, with support coalescing for the ultimate inside candidate, Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Tsutomu Hata.Unless some last-minute hitch arises, the interregnum that began April 8 when Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa announced his resignation amid scandal and government gridlock should end tomorrow with a government made up almost entirely of the current cast, except for the prime minister.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | April 20, 1994
TOKYO -- A complex, two-week struggle for the leadership of Japan appeared at an end yesterday, with support coalescing for the ultimate inside candidate, Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Tsutomu Hata.Unless some last-minute hitch arises, the interregnum that began April 8 when Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa announced his resignation amid scandal and government gridlock should end tomorrow with a government made up almost entirely of the current cast, except for the prime minister.
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