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By RICK MAESE | July 16, 2008
Anyone who thinks Brett Favre is indecisive and functionally foolish about retirement should have a talk with a boxer. Any boxer. Even after the alarm clock on his career starts buzzing, he's likely to either ignore it or hit snooze a few times and sleepwalk his way through fights. "I feel like I can do things now that I've never done before," former heavyweight champ and Baltimore native Hasim Rahman told me the other day. "I'm stronger, I'm wiser. I'm taking it to levels that I've never taken it before.
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Sports Digest | July 8, 2012
Major League Lacrosse Bayhawks fall victim to late comeback, lose at Charlotte, 13-12 The expansion Charlotte Hounds handed the visiting Chesapeake Bayhawks their first loss since May 12 on Saturday night, coming from behind to win, 13-12. Leading by three with just under six minutes to play, the Bayhawks (7-2), who remain in first place despite the setback, fell apart on the defensive end. The Hounds pulled to within 12-11 on back-to-back unassisted goals from Matt Danowski . Jeff Reynolds (Calvert Hall, Maryland)
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NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt, David Nitkin and Lem Satterfield and Laura Barnhardt, David Nitkin and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2001
Two days ago, Hasim "The Rock" Rahman was an unknown with a shot at the heavyweight boxing title. Today, a hamburger is named after him. Rahman's instant fame flows from a single punch that floored champion Lennox Lewis in a title fight that will go down in the annals of boxing as one of the biggest upsets ever -- a fight the fans in his hometown will never forget. "No one thought a Baltimore kid would become world champion," said Frank Mitsos, owner of Wahoos Sports Bar and Grill in Randallstown, which is naming a burger after Baltimore's first heavyweight champ.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | June 21, 2010
Washington DC Triathlon D.C. Mayor Fenty finishes 16th in inaugural competition Washington Mayor Adrian Fenty highlighted a field of more than 2,000 competitors Sunday in the inaugural Washington DC Triathlon, which featured Sprint and Olympic distance courses that wound through the city's monumental corridors before finishing along Pennsylvania Avenue. Competing in the Elite Olympic category, Fenty finished 16th in with a time of 2 hours, 19 minutes, 14 seconds.
FEATURES
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2001
When a bloodied Hasim "Rock" Rahman threw the big right hand that won him the heavyweight title Saturday, he did it in style, wearing black velvet HOBOs with red satin trim. Just like 20-1 underdog Rahman, HOBO, the Washington-based urban fashion line that opened a boutique in Baltimore a year ago, was largely obscure before last weekend. But both were suddenly famous in the fifth round, when Rahman knocked out defending champ Lennox Lewis while wearing trunks with the rhinestone logo - which stands for Helping Our Brothas Out. Since then, photos of Baltimore's overnight boxing sensation and the label he endorses have been splashed across the world.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2001
BIG BEAR CITY, Calif. - Adjusting to the altitude of 7,000 feet above sea level here can be like getting nailed by the punch that floored Lennox Lewis seven months ago in South Africa. The man who threw that big right hand, heavyweight champion Hasim Rahman of Baltimore, came to Big Bear to train for his rematch with Lewis. "This was a great decision to come here, to this setting, this altitude," Rahman said late last month. "I was prepared for Johannesburg, and I'm even better prepared for Lewis now."
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1998
Home-grown heavyweight contender Hasim Rahman is taking on a new image.The evidence can be seen all over town, with the boxer's visage gracing 17 billboards touting him as one of the leading challengers for Evander Holyfield's championship belt.Rahman (pronounced ROCK-mon) hopes to improve his standing tomorrow in Miami, where he tests his 29-0 record against rugged David Tua of New Zealand to determine who will be ranked No. 1 by the International Boxing Federation.Rahman's $300,000 purse for appearing in the 12-round bout will place him near the $1 million mark in career earnings.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2000
CAPITOL HEIGHTS - His ribs bruised from a brutal session with Baltimore heavyweight Hasim Rahman three days earlier, Mo Gray was the only one of four sparring partners to show up. But then Gray also begged out of last Thursday's workout. "Rock's hitting harder, he's slicker. Been banging on us pretty good," Gray said of Rahman. "You can't get in there with him anymore." So the 6-foot-3, 240-plus- pound Rahman inflicted five painful rounds upon his brother, Munir Ibn Cason, 24, who could no longer hide from big brother as he sometimes did as a child.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 30, 2002
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. - The billboards around this gambling city leave no doubt as to the marquee fighter in Saturday's heavyweight bout. Evander Holyfield is up front, and Hasim Rahman is very much in the background. Which is how it should be. Rahman may have more recently held the world title, but Holyfield is indisputably The Man. Among the top 10 highest-grossing, pay-per-view bouts of all time, Holyfield has fought in five. "The big-payday people are [Mike] Tyson, myself and Lennox Lewis.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2002
Standing on a podium and speaking into a microphone at the Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas, Baltimore boxer Hasim Rahman filled the room with his bravado. "I'm not looking for a decision. I'm looking to knock Lennox Lewis out again," Baltimore's first world heavyweight champion said on Nov. 15. But two days later, it was Rahman who went down. A right hand from Lewis swiveled Rahman's head, sending him to a fourth-round knockout loss and enabling Lewis to reclaim the heavyweight title he'd lost to Rahman in April 2001.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | May 19, 2010
Boxing Former heavyweight champion Hasim Rahman , a Baltimore native, will continue his comeback bid by fighting fellow American Shannon Miller next month. The bout is set for June 19 at the Niagara Falls (N.Y.) Conference Center and will be formally announced at a news conference today, promoter Nick Garone says. This will be the second fight for the 37-year-old Rahman (46-7-2) since he lost to Wladimir Klitschko in December 2008 in Germany. In his only fight since, Rahman stopped Clinton Boldridge in the first round in March.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | July 16, 2008
Anyone who thinks Brett Favre is indecisive and functionally foolish about retirement should have a talk with a boxer. Any boxer. Even after the alarm clock on his career starts buzzing, he's likely to either ignore it or hit snooze a few times and sleepwalk his way through fights. "I feel like I can do things now that I've never done before," former heavyweight champ and Baltimore native Hasim Rahman told me the other day. "I'm stronger, I'm wiser. I'm taking it to levels that I've never taken it before.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Sun reporter | April 28, 2007
Two amateur boxers with local ties will each take big steps in their careers this weekend, with one, Hasim Rahman Jr., 15, making his first move and the other, James Berry, 19, trying to continue on his way toward a berth in the 2008 Olympics. Hasim Jr., 6 feet 2, 200 pounds, whose football prowess once caught the eye of coaches at Gilman, is just half an inch shorter than his father, former two-time world heavyweight champion Hasim Rahman. Using fists nearly as massive as his dad's, the younger Rahman in his first fight will take on an opponent to be determined during an amateur event tonight at the Pikesville Armory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | August 24, 2006
A DAY AT HARBOR EAST For an afternoon filled with music and art, visit the Harbor East Fine Arts and Music Festival Saturday. The free outdoor festival showcases local and regional musical talent, including the Duhks, the Pale Stars, Judd and Maggie, and Rob Thorworth, as well as artists displaying and selling their works. Festival-goers can also watch street performers, visit the kids' arts and crafts area featuring activities from the Baltimore Museum of Art and Port Discovery, purchase food and more.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 14, 2006
LAS VEGAS -- When the final bell sounded, they were united in their anger. The emotions quickly evolved, though, and not long after, they were huddled together in the locker room. Hasim Rahman and his family shed tears. One of the most admirable things about Rahman has always been his devotion to his family. In fact, many attribute his first loss to Oleg Maskaev to his love for his daughter because he abandoned training camp to celebrate her first birthday. And no doubt, it's only a matter of time before people start scrutinizing his schedule leading up to Saturday's devastating defeat to Maskaev, probably with good reason.
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | August 12, 2006
LAS VEGAS -- Weighing in at a ripped 235 pounds Thursday, Hasim Rahman was told he looked like a bodybuilder heading into tonight's heavyweight title bout against Oleg Maskaev. "No, what I look like is what a heavyweight champ should look like," said Rahman, the Baltimore native who holds the World Boxing Council crown. "A bodybuilder is going to wish he could do what I'm going to do on Saturday night." Rahman needs a solid performance to maintain his hopes of a showdown with International Boxing Federation champ Wladimir Klitschko, if not to silence critics of what has been an up-and-down career.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
Even with a sparkling record in 2002, Kali Meehan still felt as if he was going nowhere as a professional boxer. "That was the fall of 2002. I wasn't getting any breaks in boxing. I was working two jobs -- security at night and a [garbage man] in the daytime -- and I've got three kids," said the 6-foot-5, 236-pound fighter from Australia. "People were offering everything, but I was getting nothing. I was sick of all the rubbish. So I walked away." The former rugby player spent the next year or so as a hired hand.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2002
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. - The fighter and the trainer agree: If Hasim Rahman is to defeat Evander Holyfield tomorrow night, he'll have to be both a boxer and a puncher, not exclusively one or the other. For if Rahman tries to play it safe by backing up, Holyfield will wade in and fire away at him. If Rahman tries to go for an early knockout, he could be the one who winds up on the canvas. "It's going to take plenty of heart and plenty of smarts," Rahman said. Said Rahman's trainer, Bouie Fisher: "Power is great, but speed and power are better."
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
BIG BEAR LAKE, Calif. -- As Hasim Rahman skipped rope to the beat of a rap tune blaring from a boombox, Brandon "Church" Johnson, a former rapper now part of Rahman's entourage, stood nearby shouting encouraging rhymes. "H-A-S-I-M." "Better than all of them." Heavyweight title fight Hasim Rahman (41-5-2, 33 KOs) vs. Oleg Maskaev (32-5, 25 KOs), tomorrow, approx. 11 p.m., Las Vegas
SPORTS
By LEM SATTERFIELD and LEM SATTERFIELD,SUN REPORTER | August 10, 2006
When heavyweight Oleg Maskaev met trainer Victor Valle Jr. nearly 3 1/2 years ago at Gleason's Gym in Brooklyn, N.Y., Maskaev was shadow-boxing and - it appeared - a shadow of the fighter he once was. "I was alone, just going through the motions," Maskaev said, recalling an 18-month period when, at the age of 33, he had gone 2-3 and was knocked out three times. WBC heavyweight title fight Hasim Rahman (41-5-2, 33 KOs) vs. Oleg Maskaev (32-5, 25 KOs), Saturday, approx. 11 p.m., Las Vegas
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