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By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
Stephen G. Bloom, a San Francisco-based journalist who had seen it all and had enough, chucked it in the early '90s and moved his family to Iowa, home of the Hawkeyes and lots of corn, but precious little of his beloved Jewish culture. "You can get bagels in Iowa," says the University of Iowa journalism professor. "But they taste more like unsweetened doughnuts." He was feeling very much like a stranger in a strange land when he stumbled upon a magazine article about a sect of Hasidic Jews called the Lubavitchers, who in 1987 moved from the Crown Heights neighborhood in Brooklyn to a tiny Iowa town called Postville to start a kosher slaughterhouse.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 30, 2002
WASHINGTON -- I just found out Ben is Jewish. Though truth is, I always suspected he was. Granted, the evidence was inconclusive, nothing that would hold up in court. Still, there was that name, Benjamin Jacob Grimm,which invokes not one, but two, Jewish patriarchs. Then, there was the fact that he was from Manhattan's Lower East Side, to which so many Jewish immigrants came fresh from Ellis Island. And finally, there was just something about him, something in his pugnacity, fatalism and humor, that struck me as characteristically Jewish.
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NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | July 26, 1993
New York--LET'S ALL put Crown Heights behind us -- certainly, but not now, not yet.To walk away from Crown Heights now, with its real meaning and the real offense of New York City's government still unstated and unexamined, would make it more likely that some other riot, some other pogrom, against some other group would be committed somewhere in America. There can be hope after Crown Heights -- but, as always, only when reality is faced.We are told Crown Heights is a matter of Mayor David Dinkins's incompetence.
FEATURES
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
Stephen G. Bloom, a San Francisco-based journalist who had seen it all and had enough, chucked it in the early '90s and moved his family to Iowa, home of the Hawkeyes and lots of corn, but precious little of his beloved Jewish culture. "You can get bagels in Iowa," says the University of Iowa journalism professor. "But they taste more like unsweetened doughnuts." He was feeling very much like a stranger in a strange land when he stumbled upon a magazine article about a sect of Hasidic Jews called the Lubavitchers, who in 1987 moved from the Crown Heights neighborhood in Brooklyn to a tiny Iowa town called Postville to start a kosher slaughterhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 17, 1992
If I were a rich man, I wouldn't have had to see "A Stranger Among Us." Lord, I ask You: Would it have mattered so much?You go to a mystery with cops and guns and murders, set on the mean streets of New York City, good dirty fun, but "Fiddler on the Roof" keeps breaking out. It's "Lethal Shiksa."Melanie Griffith plays a tough New York police detective who, after shooting a fleeing suspect, is sent not to jail but to Brooklyn to investigate a missing person in the close-knit, mysterious Hasidic community.
NEWS
August 22, 1991
A few years ago author Tom Wolfe struck a chord with his satirical novel "Bonfire of the Vanities," about the social forces set in motion by a fatal traffic accident involving a white motorist and a black teen-ager. Now life may be imitating art as New Yorkers struggle to come to grips with the aftermath of two days of rioting touched off by a real-life incident eerily reminiscent of the one described in Wolfe's fictional yarn.The trouble began Monday when a car in the motorcade of a Hasidic grand rabbi struck and killed a black 7-year-old and seriously injured another in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON and GARLAND L. THOMPSON,Garland L. Thompson writes editorials for The Sun | August 24, 1991
A tragedy like the death of 7-year-old Gavin Cato in Brooklyn,N.Y., is a sad event. Sadder still is the inter-communal brawl that came after, a name-calling, finger-pointing, bottle-throwing racial clash to make ex-Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke proud.What happened in Brooklyn is a failure of community, and its lessons for the rest of us are troubling. The hot-headed group that confronted and slew Yankel Rosenbaum, a rabbinical student who had not even seen the accident, can only be described as a mob. What started out as protests by blacks demanding the arrest of the driver who killed Gavin turned into an outbreak of racial animosity to shame the nation.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 28, 1994
WASHINGTON -- An emotionally split Supreme Court ruled yesterday that it is unconstitutional for government to do special favors for a specific religious group, as the justices struck down a public school district that was set up to serve only a community of Hasidic Jews.The decision indicated that five justices want to reconsider and perhaps overturn two prior rulings that had curbed public aid to religious schools.Yesterday's case involved Hasidic Jews in Monroe, N.Y., who sought a public school of their own to teach their disabled children.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 30, 2002
WASHINGTON -- I just found out Ben is Jewish. Though truth is, I always suspected he was. Granted, the evidence was inconclusive, nothing that would hold up in court. Still, there was that name, Benjamin Jacob Grimm,which invokes not one, but two, Jewish patriarchs. Then, there was the fact that he was from Manhattan's Lower East Side, to which so many Jewish immigrants came fresh from Ellis Island. And finally, there was just something about him, something in his pugnacity, fatalism and humor, that struck me as characteristically Jewish.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1997
NEW YORK -- To tens of thousands of Lubavitcher Jews around the world, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson was more than their "rebbe," their teacher. They believed he could be the messiah.They believed he had all the characteristics of the messiah as described in Jewish law: a living, breathing person who toils over his learning of the Torah; who strives to perform good deeds; someone who leads people to glorify and recommit themselves to Jewish traditions."The more you knew him, the more respect you had, the more in awe you were, the more you realize that there is so much there that you will never understand," says Rabbi Zalman Shmotkin, a spokesman at the Lubavitcher headquarters, in Brooklyn.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1997
NEW YORK -- To tens of thousands of Lubavitcher Jews around the world, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson was more than their "rebbe," their teacher. They believed he could be the messiah.They believed he had all the characteristics of the messiah as described in Jewish law: a living, breathing person who toils over his learning of the Torah; who strives to perform good deeds; someone who leads people to glorify and recommit themselves to Jewish traditions."The more you knew him, the more respect you had, the more in awe you were, the more you realize that there is so much there that you will never understand," says Rabbi Zalman Shmotkin, a spokesman at the Lubavitcher headquarters, in Brooklyn.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 28, 1994
WASHINGTON -- An emotionally split Supreme Court ruled yesterday that it is unconstitutional for government to do special favors for a specific religious group, as the justices struck down a public school district that was set up to serve only a community of Hasidic Jews.The decision indicated that five justices want to reconsider and perhaps overturn two prior rulings that had curbed public aid to religious schools.Yesterday's case involved Hasidic Jews in Monroe, N.Y., who sought a public school of their own to teach their disabled children.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | July 26, 1993
New York--LET'S ALL put Crown Heights behind us -- certainly, but not now, not yet.To walk away from Crown Heights now, with its real meaning and the real offense of New York City's government still unstated and unexamined, would make it more likely that some other riot, some other pogrom, against some other group would be committed somewhere in America. There can be hope after Crown Heights -- but, as always, only when reality is faced.We are told Crown Heights is a matter of Mayor David Dinkins's incompetence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 17, 1992
If I were a rich man, I wouldn't have had to see "A Stranger Among Us." Lord, I ask You: Would it have mattered so much?You go to a mystery with cops and guns and murders, set on the mean streets of New York City, good dirty fun, but "Fiddler on the Roof" keeps breaking out. It's "Lethal Shiksa."Melanie Griffith plays a tough New York police detective who, after shooting a fleeing suspect, is sent not to jail but to Brooklyn to investigate a missing person in the close-knit, mysterious Hasidic community.
NEWS
By GARLAND L. THOMPSON and GARLAND L. THOMPSON,Garland L. Thompson writes editorials for The Sun | August 24, 1991
A tragedy like the death of 7-year-old Gavin Cato in Brooklyn,N.Y., is a sad event. Sadder still is the inter-communal brawl that came after, a name-calling, finger-pointing, bottle-throwing racial clash to make ex-Ku Klux Klan leader David Duke proud.What happened in Brooklyn is a failure of community, and its lessons for the rest of us are troubling. The hot-headed group that confronted and slew Yankel Rosenbaum, a rabbinical student who had not even seen the accident, can only be described as a mob. What started out as protests by blacks demanding the arrest of the driver who killed Gavin turned into an outbreak of racial animosity to shame the nation.
NEWS
August 22, 1991
A few years ago author Tom Wolfe struck a chord with his satirical novel "Bonfire of the Vanities," about the social forces set in motion by a fatal traffic accident involving a white motorist and a black teen-ager. Now life may be imitating art as New Yorkers struggle to come to grips with the aftermath of two days of rioting touched off by a real-life incident eerily reminiscent of the one described in Wolfe's fictional yarn.The trouble began Monday when a car in the motorcade of a Hasidic grand rabbi struck and killed a black 7-year-old and seriously injured another in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 25, 1991
NEW YORK -- The Rev. Al Sharpton led about 400 shouting, chanting black protesters through the heart of the Hasidic section of Crown Heights in Brooklyn yesterday as a blue wall of police officers made sure that the march went off without serious incident.The police outnumbered the marchers, flanking them with a double column of officers marching alongside and with motorcycle patrols.A helicopter circled overhead.About 40 bearded, black-clad Hasidim watched from the porch of the Lubavitcher headquarters on Eastern Parkway as the marchers passed, chanting, "Whose streets?
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 17, 1992
If I were a rich man, I wouldn't have had to see "A Stranger Among Us." Lord, I ask You: Would it have mattered so much?You go to a mystery with cops and guns and murders, set on the mean streets of New York City, good dirty fun, but "Fiddler on the Roof" keeps breaking out. It's "Lethal Shiksa."Melanie Griffith plays a tough New York police detective who, after shooting a fleeing suspect, is sent not to jail but to Brooklyn to investigate a missing person in the close-knit, mysterious Hasidic community.
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