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By New York Times News Service | March 2, 1994
NEW YORK -- A gunman in a car opened fire on a van carrying more than a dozen Hasidic students as it began to cross the Brooklyn Bridge from Manhattan yesterday morning, critically wounding two young men and injuring two others, police said.The gunman, driving a blue Chevrolet Caprice and apparently using two guns, pursued the van full of terrified students across the bridge. He fired in three separate bursts, police said, spraying both sides of the van with fire from a 9-millimeter weapons.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2011
"The Yankles" sounds like a ribald, adult hybrid of "The Bad News Bears" and "The Chosen. " The opening-night film of the Baltimore Jewish Film Festival, it features "a washed-up former pro player" who is "sentenced to mandatory community service for a drunken-driving conviction" and "finds redemption by coaching an upstart Orthodox Jewish baseball team. " Jews and sports have long been a source of ethnic comedy. Jon Stewart exploits this supposed mismatch every baseball season on "The Daily Show.
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NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 1998
Whimsy is not a word often associated with Hasidic Jews, who include those stern-looking men with beards and broad-brimmed black hats.But it does come to mind when looking at the paintings and prints of artist Michoel Muchnik, which will be displayed Sunday at Howard County's Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education.Muchnik, a member of the Lubavitcher sect of Hasidic Jewry, started his career as a writer of children's books. And his works, even the interpretations of Jewish mystical concepts such as the overflowing wine goblet or the spiritual marriage of God and the chosen people, have a lovely fantasy quality.
FEATURES
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
Stephen G. Bloom, a San Francisco-based journalist who had seen it all and had enough, chucked it in the early '90s and moved his family to Iowa, home of the Hawkeyes and lots of corn, but precious little of his beloved Jewish culture. "You can get bagels in Iowa," says the University of Iowa journalism professor. "But they taste more like unsweetened doughnuts." He was feeling very much like a stranger in a strange land when he stumbled upon a magazine article about a sect of Hasidic Jews called the Lubavitchers, who in 1987 moved from the Crown Heights neighborhood in Brooklyn to a tiny Iowa town called Postville to start a kosher slaughterhouse.
NEWS
November 13, 1994
Martin Smith, 37, a British actor who starred in the "Phantom of the Opera" and other West End musicals, died of AIDS Nov. 5 in London. He also was in Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical "Evita" and was in "Les Miserables."Charles H. Tenney, 83, a judge in U.S. District Court who $H presided over several racial discrimination cases, died of cancer Friday in New York City. He signed a 1991 settlement in which the New York City Housing Authority agreed to temporarily accept only black or Hispanic applicants for vacancies in three housing projects.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 22, 1991
NEW YORK -- Black youths hurling rocks and bottles scuffled with the police in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn last night, even as Mayor David N. Dinkins tried to calm the racially troubled neighborhood after two nights of violence.Mr. Dinkins' efforts swiftly turned sour as he was booed and jeered by hundreds of blacks as he tried to speak. Then, as a black crowd outside pelted the building with rocks and bottles and pounded on the cars in the mayor's entourage, he was trapped inside the apartment of the family whose child had been struck and killed Monday night by a car driven by a Hasidic Jew.Wedges of police officers formed a human shield in the doorway of the brick apartment house about 7:45 p.m. as the crowd surged around them shouting, "This is not Palestine!
NEWS
April 27, 1993
Rabbi Chaim Mordechai Aizik Hodakov, 91, the chief of staff for the spiritual leader of the Lubavitcher movement, died Friday at Brookdale Hospital and Medical Center in the East New York section of Brooklyn. He died after a brief illness, said officials at the Hasidic group's headquarters in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn. Rabbi Hodakov was a highly regarded leader within the movement who held several other posts, among themdirector of the group's educational, publishing and social service branches.
NEWS
August 3, 2000
Solomon Halberstam, 92, the grand rabbi who led the Bobov sect of Orthodox Hasidic Jews out of Europe after World War II and oversaw its rebirth, gaining tens of thousands of followers, died yesterday in New York. Thousands of mourners had started gathering after Mr. Halberstam was taken to a hospital late Tuesday with internal bleeding. Mr. Halberstam, a descendant of one of the first Hasidic leaders in Europe, survived the purge of Jews by the Nazis, along with his son, Naftali. The rest of his family was killed, including his father, his youngest brother and three brothers-in-law.
NEWS
July 25, 1993
There is no comfort for the mayors of America in the report on the Crown Heights riot in Brooklyn, N.Y., in August 1991.It absolved New York Mayor David N. Dinkins of the charge of deliberately withholding police control in the first two days of that riot. This is the accusation leveled by Hasidic Jewish leaders in Crown Heights that caused Gov. Mario M. Cuomo to order the report. Yet the report also found Mayor Dinkins gravely deficient during the second and third days of the riot -- and that is the main thing noticed in New York, where there is an election.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 25, 1991
NEW YORK -- The Rev. Al Sharpton led about 400 shouting, chanting black protesters through the heart of the Hasidic section of Crown Heights in Brooklyn yesterday as a blue wall of police officers made sure that the march went off without serious incident.The police outnumbered the marchers, flanking them with a double column of officers marching alongside and with motorcycle patrols.A helicopter circled overhead.About 40 bearded, black-clad Hasidim watched from the porch of the Lubavitcher headquarters on Eastern Parkway as the marchers passed, chanting, "Whose streets?
NEWS
August 3, 2000
Solomon Halberstam, 92, the grand rabbi who led the Bobov sect of Orthodox Hasidic Jews out of Europe after World War II and oversaw its rebirth, gaining tens of thousands of followers, died yesterday in New York. Thousands of mourners had started gathering after Mr. Halberstam was taken to a hospital late Tuesday with internal bleeding. Mr. Halberstam, a descendant of one of the first Hasidic leaders in Europe, survived the purge of Jews by the Nazis, along with his son, Naftali. The rest of his family was killed, including his father, his youngest brother and three brothers-in-law.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 3, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Frustrated three times in trying to create a publicly financed school system for disabled students of their faith, a small Jewish community in Upstate New York took its continuing fight back to the Supreme Court yesterday.The village of Kiryas Joel, made up entirely of members of the devoutly religious Satmar Hasidic sect, had been before the court five years ago in a failed attempt to get legal clearance for its own school district. It rushed back to the Supreme Court yesterday after its latest setback in New York state courts three weeks ago.The sect prefers to have its children educated only in religious schools, arguing that distinctive beliefs and customs make it difficult if not impossible for Satmar children to adjust to mainstream school settings.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 31, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Isolated behind the highlands that rise above New York state's Hudson River, Jewish people of the Satmar Hasidic sect live quietly and apart in a village all their own. But they also live in the limelight of a constitutional saga.For nearly 15 years, Satmarer parents in the village of Kiryas Joel have sought a way that they can afford to teach their disabled children in a setting that does not force the families to forfeit their religious beliefs or their culture.Getting the state legislature to help -- by creating a public school that qualifies for state and federal aid but is able to conform to the Satmar lifestyle -- has created a classic constitutional controversy over government accommodation of religion.
NEWS
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 1998
Whimsy is not a word often associated with Hasidic Jews, who include those stern-looking men with beards and broad-brimmed black hats.But it does come to mind when looking at the paintings and prints of artist Michoel Muchnik, which will be displayed Sunday at Howard County's Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education.Muchnik, a member of the Lubavitcher sect of Hasidic Jewry, started his career as a writer of children's books. And his works, even the interpretations of Jewish mystical concepts such as the overflowing wine goblet or the spiritual marriage of God and the chosen people, have a lovely fantasy quality.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | June 15, 1995
A playwright, two members of Congress and more than 500 theatergoers sat in the dark grappling with the issue of distrust between Jews and African-Americans.There were elderly businessmen and drama students, elementary school teachers from Baltimore County and HIV-prevention counselors from the city. There were rabbis, lawyers, ministers and musicians.They had come to Center Stage Tuesday night to watch Baltimore native Anna Deavere Smith's one-woman play about the 1991 riots in New York City's Crown Heights neighborhood, a clash between African-Americans and Orthodox Jews.
NEWS
November 13, 1994
Martin Smith, 37, a British actor who starred in the "Phantom of the Opera" and other West End musicals, died of AIDS Nov. 5 in London. He also was in Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical "Evita" and was in "Les Miserables."Charles H. Tenney, 83, a judge in U.S. District Court who $H presided over several racial discrimination cases, died of cancer Friday in New York City. He signed a 1991 settlement in which the New York City Housing Authority agreed to temporarily accept only black or Hispanic applicants for vacancies in three housing projects.
NEWS
By JACK FRUCHTMAN Jr | December 29, 1993
The Supreme Court has an unusual problem. Last month the justices decided to hear a case involving a decision by the state of New York to carve out a special school district in Orange County to serve handicapped Satmar Hasidic Jewish children. The court now has to determine whether this decision is an unconstitutional violation of the First Amendment.The Hasidic Jewish community of Kiryas Joel claims that it wants to take advantage of a federal law protecting disabled children, without losing its right of self-governance and its interpretation of Judaism.
NEWS
By Arnold Ages | March 22, 1992
SAGES AND DREAMERS:BIBLICAL, TALMUDIC, ANDHASIDIC PORTRAITSAND LEGENDS.Elie Wiesel.Summit.443 pages. $25.Elie Wiesel, the Nobel peace laureate, stands in the distinguished tradition of Jewish scholars ready to share their learning with the masses. His current volume -- a compendium of Rabbinic lore on Biblical, Talmudic (post-Biblical) and Hasidic (Jewish mystics) material -- is an encyclopedic survey of personalities, movements and theological ideas spanning more than 2,000 years of Jewish history.
NEWS
By MARC D. STERN | July 3, 1994
The prolonged controversy over the Kiryas Joel School District culminated last week in a Supreme Court decision holding an all-Hasidic public school district unconstitutional. It is more interesting as an illustration of the difficulty that society has accommodating groups in fundamental discord with its values -- and our collective fascination with a group so at odds with our pervasive modern culture -- than it is as law.The decision should have surprised no one familiar with the Constitution, the political thought of the Founders nor the long struggle for religious liberty preceding the First Amendment.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
When he was age 4, Hillel Moshe Baron went with his father to see the Lubavitcher rebbe, Menachem Mendel Schneerson, in New York, a common thing for Hasidic Lubavitch Jews seeking his guidance.When the boy turned 13, his father took him to see the rebbe again, this time for his bar mitzvah. And although the rabbi had counseled thousands of visitors daily, he had not forgotten the youngster he had met nine years earlier."He addressed himself to me without any introduction," he said, adding that others had often confused him with his younger brother.
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