Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHashana
IN THE NEWS

Hashana

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 8, 1991
All Howard County public schools and offices will be closed on Monday, Sept. 9, in observance of Rosh Hashana. They will reopen Tuesday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2013
According to Jewish tradition, those who atone over the High Holidays for the sins of the past year will be granted peace, prosperity and life. As thousands of area Jews prepare to begin the solemn season Wednesday night amid high tensions in the Middle East, local rabbis say they've been praying that God might bestow similar good fortune on Israel. The topic of the Jewish homeland has long been an integral part of the religious observations for Rosh Hashana, which starts at sundown Wednesday, to Yom Kippur on Sept.
Advertisement
FEATURES
September 4, 1991
A braised beef brisket makes a delicious dinner for Rosh Hashana, the upcoming celebration of the Jewish new year. Long, slow cooking in liquid tenderizes the boneless brisket to melt-in-the-mouth perfection.K? This recipe is from the National Live Stock and Meat Board.Beef Brisket with Savory Onion Sauce3 to 3 1/2 pound boneless beef brisket, flat half2 medium onions, thinly sliced2 large garlic cloves, minced1/2 to 3/4 teaspoon coarse ground pepper1 cup beer1/2 cup chili sauce2 pounds, about 10, small red potatoesTrim excess fat from beef brisket.
NEWS
March 21, 2013
I read with interest about the conflict between the Ravens' season opener and a Baltimore Orioles game scheduled to be played during the heat of the pennant race ("Scheduling conflict leaves NFL season opener here up in the air," March 19). As I understand it, both teams are scheduled to play on the same day in pretty much the same time slot. The obvious question is why can't the Orioles just move up the time of their game to maybe 1 p.m. or even 12:30 p.m.? The NFL says that scheduling the Ravens' game on Sept.
NEWS
September 23, 1992
UNIONTOWN -- In observance of the Jewish celebration of Rosh Hashana, a "Joyful Sound" program on "Rosh Hashana and the Rapture" will be broadcast at 8 p.m. Friday, and noon and 7 p.m. Monday on cable channel 55."Joyful Sound -- Witness of God's Grace" is a television ministry of Uniontown Bible Church. Regular broadcast times are noon Saturdays and noon and 7 p.m. Tuesdays.This week's program is the message, "Agape is Joyful over Truth."Sunday worship at the church is at 10 a.m. with the sermon "Agape is Steadfast," which will be aired Saturday and Tuesday.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1998
The latest cookbooks celebrating Jewish culture and cuisine emphasize the global nature of the foods enjoyed. Among the holidays, Rosh Hashana, which this year begins at sundown on Sept. 20, marks the beginning of the new year with prayer and reflection. Some of the foods traditionally served represent plenty, or fertility, and honey and apples are served to symbolize hopes for a sweet year ahead. Here's an eclectic selection of recipes appropriate for Rosh Hashana.The first recipe, the Chicken With Almonds and Prunes, is a tagine, or stew, and is traditionally served over couscous or rice.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | September 19, 1990
A Rosh Hashana sermon is different.For a regular Sabbath, Rabbi Daniel Lehmann will spend a week preparing a sermon. But for Rosh Hashana -- which ushers in the Jewish New Year at sundown tonight and continues through the Ten Days of Penitence to Yom Kippur -- the rabbi will take a month to find the proper theme.He will write, rewrite, polish every phrase until the words are just right."It's different because this is the start of the Jewish high holy days, and because of the big crowds we expect," says Lehmann, the assistant rabbi at the Orthodox Beth Tfiloh Congregation at 3300 Old Court Road.
FEATURES
By Marcy Goldman | September 1, 1991
As the sun sets next Sunday night, those celebrating the Jewish New Year 5752, Rosh Hashana, turn their thoughts to the year that has passed and the new one that awaits.Early autumn brings the Jewish Days of Awe, commencing with Rosh Hashana and culminating with the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur. It is a time of reflection and assessment, filled with joy and solemnity. It is a time to review one's merits and one's pitfalls and to re-commit to a positive life course. For many, Rosh Hashana memories include the squeaky feel of black patent shoes or a rustling new holiday dress, the timeless New Year's services and songs, Hebrew school snacks of honey and apple slices, and theheady scent of Indian summer that pervades the warm, familial gatherings.
FEATURES
By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,Special to The Sun Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 28, 1994
Like many Moroccan-born Jews who emigrated to the United States, Solange Emsellem, 71, places great importance on symbolism. For Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, she will not serve black olives for fear that the color and sour taste might augur evil for the coming year. She removes the purply black skin of eggplants for similar reasons."I know it's in my head," she said at her Rockville home. "We think of black as a mourning color, not green for happiness for the New Year and the harvest period."
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
The school board, under pressure from the Jewish community to delay the start of 1994-1995 academic year because of Rosh Hashana, voted last week to have students begin classes Sept. 7, one day later than planned.Robert L. Christopher, president of the Harford Jewish Center, the county's only synagogue, and other community leaders had lobbied for a two-day delay to avoid a conflict with the start of Rosh Hashana, the 10-day period that marks the beginning of the Jewish New Year.Rosh Hashana is one of the holiest days of the Jewish calendar.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2012
It's an unlikely setting for a religious ritual, behind a busy grocery store parking lot and nearly underneath a rumbling expressway. But this stretch of the Jones Falls — the stream rather than the highway that takes its name — provided the necessary running water on Monday for the first day of Rosh Hashana, when Jews celebrate their faith's new year by symbolically casting off the sins of the last one. "This year, I don't have much to...
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2011
For certain religious oenophiles, Wednesday's dinner presented an interesting question: "What wine goes with services?" wondered Arnold Weiner. Judging from the crowd gathered Wednesday night at Oregon Ridge Park for the popular al fresco Rosh Hashana service marking the Jewish New Year, white, red and rose all had their adherents.(For the record, Weiner, the lawyer famous for defending former Mayor Sheila Dixon in her corruption trial, went with a crisp pinot grigio.) Started five years ago by Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, Rosh Hashana Under the Stars has become a tradition for thousands, who flock to the rolling grounds of the Baltimore County park for an event that has brought a tailgating spin to the ages-old service marking the start of the High Holy Days.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Liz F. Kay,liz.kay@baltsun.com | September 29, 2008
Ron Reitman remembers how silent his synagogue always gets at Rosh Hashana services, right before the shofar is sounded. "You could hear a pin drop, it's so quiet," he said. "Everyone stands at attention." Tomorrow, Reitman will blow the ceremonial ram's horn himself, in a less hushed environment: a hospital room. Reitman, a transportation planner who lives downtown, has been trained along with other volunteers to blow the shofar in time to bring this element of the Rosh Hashana celebration to Jews too sick to attend services.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | September 24, 2008
One of the many traditions of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, is to ask God's blessing for a sweet year. From that comes another tradition: consuming honey. It's not part of Jewish law, but "it is a cultural blessing," says Rabbi Alan Yuter of B'nai Israel Congregation of Baltimore. "It associates sweetness with ingesting sweetness. It's not part of the religion; it is part of popular folklore."
NEWS
By Arthur J. Magida | September 19, 2007
I have met my guru. His name is Henry. He has four legs. I met him in temple. On Rosh Hashana. Henry is a seeing-eye dog. During services, he sniffed me, stood up and pressed his head down on my knee, and sighed softly as I rubbed him firmly behind the ears, a spot irresistible to any canine. Most of the time, Henry lay on the floor in front of the seat next to me, absolutely content with his condition in the world; a bodhisattva, a Buddhist might say - an enlightened being dedicated to delivering others from their sorrows; or a lamed-vav tsaddik, a Kabbalist might say - one of the 36 righteous individuals in every generation who live anonymously and whose very existence in the world prevents its destruction.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | September 5, 2007
Every year as the Jewish High Holy Days approach, Amy Pollokoff goes shopping. She buys five dozen eggs, 30 pounds of sugar, 30 pounds of flour, 16 pounds of butter and two 4-pound bags of chocolate chips, among other things. Then, three weeks before her annual cookie party, the Owings Mills mother of two starts baking. She makes strudel and candy-bar cookies, Austrian nut-butter cookies and cream-cheese cookies. In all, she makes 21 kinds of cookies, doubling and tripling most recipes.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1995
Rosh Hashana, which ushers in the start of Judaism's High Holy Days at sundown tonight, is known as the Jewish New Year. By the Hebrew calendar, the holiday marks the creation of the world 5756 years ago."It's a time of year when you look over the past year to see if you were a good person and see if you can be a better person," said Ben Hoffman, a vending company owner in Pikesville's Chizuk Amuno congregation. "When you were a kid you played outside the synagogue until your father pulled you in by the ear, but I get a lot more out of it now, just sitting and reflecting."
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,Sun Foreign Reporter | September 25, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel's national electric company is facing a religious quandary: How can the Jewish state's power supplier generate electricity on the Sabbath without violating the laws of the Jewish day of rest and prayer? To find an answer, the multibillion-dollar company has turned to the shabby offices of Rabbi Levi Yitzchak Halperin, a 72-year-old spiritual adviser with a Father Time beard, who is widely recognized as the final word on what is possible and what is not under Orthodox Jewish law. Jewish law provides a guide for the actions of observant Jews from morning until night.
NEWS
September 22, 2006
Rosh Hashana starts at 6:47 tonight Rosh Hashana, the solemn and joyous festival celebrating the Jewish New Year, begins tonight locally at 6:47 p.m., 18 minutes before sunset, when candles are lighted in Jewish homes to inaugurate the Sabbath and the holiday. "It's the Jewish New Year and the Day of Judgment, the day when we make a resolution to improve our ways, to make amends ... and go in God's way in the future," said Rabbi Hillel Baron of the Lubavitch Center for Jewish Education.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.