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February 6, 2005
Holly Marie Kavanaugh and Derek Jon Haseltine were married on November 20, 2004 at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Crofton, MD. The receptionwas held at the Sheraton Barcelo Hotelof Annapolis. The bride is the daughter of Judith A. Kavanaugh, of Halethorpe, MD, and the late Charles E. Kavanaugh, Sr. She graduated from Towson University with a Bachelor's degree in Mass Communications and is a Property Administrator with MIEProperties, Inc. The groom is the son of Reginald and Nancy Haseltine, of Crofton, MD. He holds a Bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland at College Park and a Master's of Education degree from The University of Texas.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 29, 2008
Haseltine French Ham, a former histology technician and Oxford resident, died of respiratory failure Sunday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 93. Haseltine French Harper was born in Covington, Va. She spent the first six years of her life in a Richmond, Va., orphanage. Her mother died while giving birth to her, and her father died shortly thereafter. In the late 1920s, she married Leonard Oden after moving to Washington. He died in 1938. Mrs. Ham was working as a seamstress when she married George Allen Ham, a salesman, in 1941.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 29, 2008
Haseltine French Ham, a former histology technician and Oxford resident, died of respiratory failure Sunday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. She was 93. Haseltine French Harper was born in Covington, Va. She spent the first six years of her life in a Richmond, Va., orphanage. Her mother died while giving birth to her, and her father died shortly thereafter. In the late 1920s, she married Leonard Oden after moving to Washington. He died in 1938. Mrs. Ham was working as a seamstress when she married George Allen Ham, a salesman, in 1941.
BUSINESS
By TRICIA BISHOP and TRICIA BISHOP,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
William A. Haseltine had a 55-acre, half-billion-dollar compound and a manufacturing plant built for his former biotech company, Human Genome Sciences, despite its having never brought a single product to market. With a facade made entirely of reflective glass, the six-story corporate headquarters juts into the sky almost invisibly. Inside, an atrium-style lobby has a lush garden and a 100-foot-long sculpture that depicts the birth of a protein. The floor is made of fossilized stone tile, and light filters through panels in the ceiling.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 2004
William A. Haseltine, the bold-talking chairman and chief executive of Human Genome Sciences Inc., will be leaving the Rockville company as it struggles to realize his grand vision of parlaying genetic information into a cornucopia of new drugs. Haseltine said yesterday that he would retire later this year, probably in the fall, after a successor is found and he turns 60. He says the move is voluntary, and that as the company shifts from gene research to drug development, it needs an experienced pharmaceutical executive at the top rather than a scientist like himself.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2004
Human Genome Sciences Inc. hired a longtime veteran of Abbott Laboratories Inc. as its new chief executive officer yesterday, the second Maryland biotechnology firm in a week to reach outside the company for new leadership. Rockville-based Human Genome Sciences said its founder, William A. Haseltine, who retired last month, would be succeeded as CEO by H. Thomas Watkins. Watkins, 51, joins Human Genome after having spent most of the past two decades with pharmaceutical giant Abbott Labs and its affiliates.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and William Patalon III and Stacey Hirsh and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2004
Human Genome Sciences Inc., the Rockville biotechnology company whose model to battle the worst maladies using the human genetic map captivated and then disappointed investors, announced yesterday a changing of the guard to take effect as its founder, a seminal leader in the industry, retires. Craig A. Rosen, who has worked at Human Genome since the company began 12 years ago, was promoted to president and chief operating officer, effective immediately. Argeris "Jerry" N. Karabelas will become chairman of Human Genome's board of directors after Chairman and Chief Executive Officer William A. Haseltine's previously announced retirement takes effect Oct. 17. Human Genome is continuing its search for a new CEO who can help bring the company's first stable of drugs to market and put it on a path for growth, although the company said there is no deadline for making the key appointment.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
Human Genome Sciences Inc., which has seen its shares rocket more than 350 percent in a year, said yesterday that it would split its stock 2-for-1 this month. The split, the company's first, will occur Jan. 28 for stockholders of record Jan. 14. William A. Haseltine, Human Genome's president and chief executive officer, said the Rockville company's board decided to approve the split in part because the company's shares were being sought by a growing number of large institutional investors and retail buyers.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Human Genome Sciences is in the process of beginning an independent audit of its clinical trials amid "a renewed climate of concern" nationally over the testing of gene-based drugs in people, Chief Executive Officer William Haseltine told shareholders yesterday at the company's annual meeting. Haseltine made the comments after shareholders asked about several events this year, including HGS' hiring of a new vice president of regulatory affairs and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's hold on clinical trials involving VEGF-2, a gene-therapy drug manufactured by HGS. Haseltine did not elaborate on the audit plans of the Rockville-based and left shortly after the shareholders meeting for a board meeting.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kaiser and Rob Kaiser,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 28, 2000
Black boxes aren't just for airplanes anymore. General Motors has begun putting less sophisticated versions of the boxes, which they call "event data recorders," into automobiles. It started in the 1970s when air bag sensors began recording cars' velocity at the time of crash impact. GM has added more monitoring functions in the past few years, including recording the speed of the vehicle, throttle position and brake use at the time of a crash -- as well as whether the driver was wearing a seat belt.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005
Holly Marie Kavanaugh and Derek Jon Haseltine were married on November 20, 2004 at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church in Crofton, MD. The receptionwas held at the Sheraton Barcelo Hotelof Annapolis. The bride is the daughter of Judith A. Kavanaugh, of Halethorpe, MD, and the late Charles E. Kavanaugh, Sr. She graduated from Towson University with a Bachelor's degree in Mass Communications and is a Property Administrator with MIEProperties, Inc. The groom is the son of Reginald and Nancy Haseltine, of Crofton, MD. He holds a Bachelor's degree from the University of Maryland at College Park and a Master's of Education degree from The University of Texas.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2004
Human Genome Sciences Inc. hired a longtime veteran of Abbott Laboratories Inc. as its new chief executive officer yesterday, the second Maryland biotechnology firm in a week to reach outside the company for new leadership. Rockville-based Human Genome Sciences said its founder, William A. Haseltine, who retired last month, would be succeeded as CEO by H. Thomas Watkins. Watkins, 51, joins Human Genome after having spent most of the past two decades with pharmaceutical giant Abbott Labs and its affiliates.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and William Patalon III and Stacey Hirsh and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2004
Human Genome Sciences Inc., the Rockville biotechnology company whose model to battle the worst maladies using the human genetic map captivated and then disappointed investors, announced yesterday a changing of the guard to take effect as its founder, a seminal leader in the industry, retires. Craig A. Rosen, who has worked at Human Genome since the company began 12 years ago, was promoted to president and chief operating officer, effective immediately. Argeris "Jerry" N. Karabelas will become chairman of Human Genome's board of directors after Chairman and Chief Executive Officer William A. Haseltine's previously announced retirement takes effect Oct. 17. Human Genome is continuing its search for a new CEO who can help bring the company's first stable of drugs to market and put it on a path for growth, although the company said there is no deadline for making the key appointment.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | June 17, 2004
The National Security Agency is stepping out of the shadows to be a shadowy business partner, a potential gold mine for Maryland. The agency said yesterday that it plans to spend at least several million dollars in the short term to invest in and buy from local startups that develop high technology useful to its code-making, code-breaking and eavesdropping mission. The NSA also wants to push some of its own innovations outside the fence of its high-security Fort Meade instillation and into Maryland companies that can develop and commercialize ideas - in large part so it can buy back the finished products.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 25, 2004
William A. Haseltine, the bold-talking chairman and chief executive of Human Genome Sciences Inc., will be leaving the Rockville company as it struggles to realize his grand vision of parlaying genetic information into a cornucopia of new drugs. Haseltine said yesterday that he would retire later this year, probably in the fall, after a successor is found and he turns 60. He says the move is voluntary, and that as the company shifts from gene research to drug development, it needs an experienced pharmaceutical executive at the top rather than a scientist like himself.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2000
Human Genome Sciences is in the process of beginning an independent audit of its clinical trials amid "a renewed climate of concern" nationally over the testing of gene-based drugs in people, Chief Executive Officer William Haseltine told shareholders yesterday at the company's annual meeting. Haseltine made the comments after shareholders asked about several events this year, including HGS' hiring of a new vice president of regulatory affairs and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's hold on clinical trials involving VEGF-2, a gene-therapy drug manufactured by HGS. Haseltine did not elaborate on the audit plans of the Rockville-based and left shortly after the shareholders meeting for a board meeting.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
Human Genome Sciences Inc., the biotechnology company that has been mapping the codes for human and other genes, said yesterday that it will build a $40 million facility in Rockville to produce new drugs based on its vast storehouse of genetic information.The decision is Maryland's win and Virginia's loss.The publicly held company, which has no production facility now, looked at more than 100 sites in four states before narrowing the field to several in Maryland and Virginia, said William A. Haseltine, Human Genome's chairman and chief executive officer.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | March 20, 1997
Human Genome Sciences Inc., the Rockville company mapping genes and researching their role in regulating body functions and diseases, expects to launch a human clinical trial late this year on its first potential medical therapy to spin out of its research."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kaiser and Rob Kaiser,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 28, 2000
Black boxes aren't just for airplanes anymore. General Motors has begun putting less sophisticated versions of the boxes, which they call "event data recorders," into automobiles. It started in the 1970s when air bag sensors began recording cars' velocity at the time of crash impact. GM has added more monitoring functions in the past few years, including recording the speed of the vehicle, throttle position and brake use at the time of a crash -- as well as whether the driver was wearing a seat belt.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2000
Human Genome Sciences Inc., which has seen its shares rocket more than 350 percent in a year, said yesterday that it would split its stock 2-for-1 this month. The split, the company's first, will occur Jan. 28 for stockholders of record Jan. 14. William A. Haseltine, Human Genome's president and chief executive officer, said the Rockville company's board decided to approve the split in part because the company's shares were being sought by a growing number of large institutional investors and retail buyers.
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