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By Bob Raissman and Bob Raissman,New York Daily News | July 4, 1993
The road routine was the same Tuesday as it has been for years. Up at 7 a.m., a little stretching exercise, coffee, breakfast, read the papers, conduct business over the phone, out for lunch, back to the hotel, catch a short nap, listen to the radio and out to the ballpark.For 31 years this was Ernie Harwell's day as the radio voice of the Detroit Tigers. Before that it was with the Orioles, New York Giants, Brooklyn Dodgers and Atlanta Crackers of the Southern Association. The career spans five decades with only one slight interruption.
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NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
Baltimore baseball fans of a certain age had to be saddened by the recent news that veteran baseball broadcaster Ernie Harwell, who was the voice of the Detroit Tigers for 42 years and before that was the voice of the Orioles for the first six years after the St. Louis Browns' franchise arrived in Baltimore in 1954, was diagnosed with cancer. Harwell, now 91, told The Detroit Free Press last week that he has declined to undergo surgery or treatment. "We don't know how long this lasts.
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SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Staff Writer | September 26, 1993
While working at a radio station in Southern California a few years ago, Fred Manfra finally got to meet Ernie Harwell, the man who talked him to sleep as a child growing up in Baltimore."
FEATURES
By Patrick S. Pemberton and Patrick S. Pemberton,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 6, 2005
Everybody sing along: Hey now, you're a cash cow, get your game on, get paid. OK, that was a shameless mangling of Smash Mouth's biggest hit, "All-Star." You have to admit, though, for a band with only a handful of chart busters, they've had huge exposure - thanks to commercials, TV shows and movies. "We are probably one of the most licensed bands out there for movies and TV shows," admits lead singer Steve Harwell. As you might expect, people ask Harwell if the band has sold out. But before you get too judgmental, ask yourself: Would I turn down free money?
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1999
Broadcasting legend Ernie Harwell, voice of the Orioles for the first six years after the St. Louis Browns' franchise arrived in Baltimore in 1954 and a man whose voice has been compared to a "dripping Georgia peach cobbler," is back on the air.After his Orioles' stint, Harwell was the radio voice of the Detroit Tigers from 1960 until 1993, when then team president Bo Schembechler "retired" him. That meant his voice was pretty much limited to the broadcasters' wing...
NEWS
January 25, 2005
On January 23, 2005, LOUIS LAVERNE HARTZELL; beloved husband of the late Nancy D. Hartzell; devoted father of Dianna Skerritt, Suzanne Laura Smith and predeceased by daughter Lisa Renee Perry; adored grandfather of Lindsay Brown, Ryan Mc Alexander, Rachel Wiley, Nancy Wiley, James Wiley III, Amanda Wiley, Shannon Harwell, Jr., Stephanie Harwell and Kyle Parsley. Also survived by two brothers, three sisters, nieces, nephews and a host of friends. Friends may call at the LOUDON PARK FUNERAL HOME, 3620 Wilkens Ave., Baltimore, on Wednesday, from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 PM where Funeral Services will be held on Thursday, 1 PM. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | September 13, 2009
Baltimore baseball fans of a certain age had to be saddened by the recent news that veteran baseball broadcaster Ernie Harwell, who was the voice of the Detroit Tigers for 42 years and before that was the voice of the Orioles for the first six years after the St. Louis Browns' franchise arrived in Baltimore in 1954, was diagnosed with cancer. Harwell, now 91, told The Detroit Free Press last week that he has declined to undergo surgery or treatment. "We don't know how long this lasts.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | May 7, 1993
Harwell still speaking volumesErnie Harwell must have the biggest hands in baseball. On Monday night in Washington, he held 600 people in his palm.Those folks, seemingly every one a Detroit Tigers fan -- at least for the night -- were attending Part 3 of the Smithsonian Institution's "Voices of the Game" series.Early in the program, a call came in from NBC's Bob Costas. He recalled sitting in the family car as a child on Long Island, N.Y., tuning the car radio to Detroit's WJR to listen to Harwell.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | October 7, 1991
"It's the old completion of the circle," Ernie Harwell said yesterday, writing the caption to go with any picture of Memorial Stadium's last baseball day.Harwell -- who called the first major-league game as the team's voice -- was speaking about his presence during WBAL Radio's broadcast of the Baltimore Orioles' finale. It indeed did complete circle, much like the one formed by current and former Orioles at game's end.In broadcasting, though, the old and new stars can perform on the same field.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 4, 2005
SINCE THE PONIES are prancing and the mint is sprouting, it must be time to make the juleps. Mint juleps, the elixir of the throngs watching this Saturday's Kentucky Derby in Louisville, are a miraculous mixture of mint, sugar water, ice and bourbon. Or so I thought until I read The Mint Julep, a lyrical book reprinted this month by the University of Virginia Press. Written in 1975 by Richard Barksdale Harwell, a historian with ties to UVA who died in 1988, this 96-page treatise is filled with julep history, tales of julep-making lore and recipes.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | May 4, 2005
SINCE THE PONIES are prancing and the mint is sprouting, it must be time to make the juleps. Mint juleps, the elixir of the throngs watching this Saturday's Kentucky Derby in Louisville, are a miraculous mixture of mint, sugar water, ice and bourbon. Or so I thought until I read The Mint Julep, a lyrical book reprinted this month by the University of Virginia Press. Written in 1975 by Richard Barksdale Harwell, a historian with ties to UVA who died in 1988, this 96-page treatise is filled with julep history, tales of julep-making lore and recipes.
NEWS
January 25, 2005
On January 23, 2005, LOUIS LAVERNE HARTZELL; beloved husband of the late Nancy D. Hartzell; devoted father of Dianna Skerritt, Suzanne Laura Smith and predeceased by daughter Lisa Renee Perry; adored grandfather of Lindsay Brown, Ryan Mc Alexander, Rachel Wiley, Nancy Wiley, James Wiley III, Amanda Wiley, Shannon Harwell, Jr., Stephanie Harwell and Kyle Parsley. Also survived by two brothers, three sisters, nieces, nephews and a host of friends. Friends may call at the LOUDON PARK FUNERAL HOME, 3620 Wilkens Ave., Baltimore, on Wednesday, from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 PM where Funeral Services will be held on Thursday, 1 PM. Interment Loudon Park Cemetery.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | August 21, 2002
"Only truth can give true reputation; only reality can be of real profit. Unfounded things never reach old age." - Balthasar Gracian, 17th-century Spanish Jesuit We speak in baseball of immortality, of Ruthian clouts, of Mays' catches - even, if gruesomely now, of the mastery of Ted Williams, the Fenway deity whose corpse lies frozen in a cryonics lab, there to "live," perhaps, for a creepy eternity. Mostly, though, we speak of deeds, of acts that will live forever in the collective memory of the game.
SPORTS
By Mike Penner and Mike Penner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 2002
Late Orioles game: Late night's game between the Orioles and Twins in Minneapolis, which went into extra innings, ended too late to be included in this edition. A complete report can be found in later editions or on the Internet at http://www.sunspot.net. ANAHEIM, Calif. - Ernie Harwell did not know Chick Hearn. Never met him, never heard him. And, being Ernie Harwell, he almost apologizes for that shortcoming. "Of course I knew of his great reputation and the hold that he had on this region here," Harwell said Monday evening at Edison Field before pulling on the headset for the Detroit Tigers' latest defeat against the Anaheim Angels.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEADMAN | July 18, 1999
Quality of voice, a profound knowledge of baseball -- worthy of Phi Beta Kappa recognition -- and the ability to transmit the subject matter with an attention-getting professional presence have carved a distinctive identity for Ernie Harwell. He has been an artist with words, painting vivid pictures; a moving montage, so to speak, from parks and stadiums across the landscape of America.It has been more than 50 years and still he goes on, uninterrupted, defying the aging process and creating a longevity that has informed and entertained generations of listeners.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 22, 1999
Broadcasting legend Ernie Harwell, voice of the Orioles for the first six years after the St. Louis Browns' franchise arrived in Baltimore in 1954 and a man whose voice has been compared to a "dripping Georgia peach cobbler," is back on the air.After his Orioles' stint, Harwell was the radio voice of the Detroit Tigers from 1960 until 1993, when then team president Bo Schembechler "retired" him. That meant his voice was pretty much limited to the broadcasters' wing...
FEATURES
By Patrick S. Pemberton and Patrick S. Pemberton,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 6, 2005
Everybody sing along: Hey now, you're a cash cow, get your game on, get paid. OK, that was a shameless mangling of Smash Mouth's biggest hit, "All-Star." You have to admit, though, for a band with only a handful of chart busters, they've had huge exposure - thanks to commercials, TV shows and movies. "We are probably one of the most licensed bands out there for movies and TV shows," admits lead singer Steve Harwell. As you might expect, people ask Harwell if the band has sold out. But before you get too judgmental, ask yourself: Would I turn down free money?
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 7, 1996
It was George Santayana who observed that "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Apparently, not much Santayana is being read in the Orioles' offices.The explosion that has accompanied the departure of Jon Miller is eerily reminiscent of what happened in Detroit five years ago when Tigers management tried to dump Hall of Fame broadcaster Ernie Harwell.To recap, then-Detroit president Bo Schembechler decided that Harwell, a fixture on the airwaves there for over 30 years -- after he left Baltimore in 1960 -- was no longer needed, and tapped Rick Rizzs and Bob Rathbun.
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