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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 24, 2007
When Harvey Weinstein was the head of Miramax, I often thought of him as the heir to those legendary studio greats Irving Thalberg and Louis B. Mayer. He has Thalberg's creativity and Mayer's, well, power. And he even assembled a kind of indie stable of stars who would work for him for practically nothing. Miramax - which Harvey founded and is a mix of his parents' names, Miriam and Max - still exists, though without Harvey. He was not allowed to take his company name with him when he split from Disney.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | April 8, 2008
Of course, the most brutish part of my job is having to sit with men like George Clooney and Bruce Willis for dinner. But somebody has to do it and that lucky somebody is sometimes me. The other night in 21, after the feisty Leatherheads movie premiere at MOMA, Oscar winners and glamorous VIPS were mixing it up with millionaires and their rich wives. Nay, some were billionaires! I did spy David and Julia Koch, Joan Ganz Cooney and Pete Peterson, Woody "he owns the Jets" Johnson and Suzanne Ircha, Samantha Boardman and Aby Rosen, Jeanne and Herb Siegel and John and Susan Gutfreund.
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NEWS
By Newsday | August 17, 1993
NEW YORK -- For 12 excruciating days and nights, New York clothing executive Harvey Weinstein clung to life inside a tiny dark pit, 14 feet below a secluded rail yard in Upper Manhattan, where a band of kidnappers had left him to die.He survived by eating fruit, mostly bananas, that the kidnappers lowered to him until they received the requested ransom money.The one-time Marine lay in total darkness, his legs in shackles; at times, so were his arms.He made tape recordings at his captors' instruction, pleading with his children to pay a $3 million ransom.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | October 24, 2007
When Harvey Weinstein was the head of Miramax, I often thought of him as the heir to those legendary studio greats Irving Thalberg and Louis B. Mayer. He has Thalberg's creativity and Mayer's, well, power. And he even assembled a kind of indie stable of stars who would work for him for practically nothing. Miramax - which Harvey founded and is a mix of his parents' names, Miriam and Max - still exists, though without Harvey. He was not allowed to take his company name with him when he split from Disney.
NEWS
May 27, 2007
Harvey Weinstein, 82 Tuxedo company executive Harvey Weinstein, a former tuxedo company executive who was buried alive for 12 days after being kidnapped in 1993, died May 13 in Manhattan after a lengthy illness. He was 82. Known as the "tuxedo king," Weinstein was CEO of Lord West, a company that manufactured formal wear. Weinstein retired in 1999. The abduction occurred Aug. 4, 1993. Fermin Rodriguez, a collar maker at Weinstein's company, and two accomplices, kidnapped Weinstein and buried him in a pit near the Hudson River.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | August 24, 1993
New York. -- "Hugs Finest, Thanks God, Loves N.Y.'' was one of the orgy of headlines -- this one in the Daily News -- that celebrated the homecoming of Harvey Weinstein. He is the city's greatest hero because he did what most of us hope to do these days: He survived.And, in case anyone missed the point of why we cheer the kidnapped tuxedo maven imprisoned in a pit along the West Side Highway, we saw the alternate ending along Interstate 95 in North Carolina. James Jordan, the father of the most famous athlete in the country, was shot to death in cold blood because he happened to stop at the wrong spot along the main street of the eastern United States.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 19, 1993
NEW YORK -- While he sometimes lost hope, Harvey Weinstein never lost his fighting spirit during the 12 days he was entombed in a darkened pit.At an emotional news conference yesterday with New York Mayor David N. Dinkins, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly and the detectives who set him free, an unshaven Mr. Weinstein embraced the men to whom he owes his life and said his rescue "redoubled" his feelings of pride in New York."
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
For decades, Hollywood observers have said African-Americans and whites would not operate on a level playing field - or sound stage - until the ranks of studio executives and producers opened to black talents. Yesterday, Robert Johnson, founder of Black Entertainment Television, moved to even the landscape. He announced the formation of Our Stories Films, a company dedicated to producing African-American family comedies. He's chosen partners who've proven themselves at making fresh inroads with audiences and moviemakers: Bob and Harvey Weinstein, co-founders of Miramax and co-chairmen of the Weinstein Co. "The one consistent cry I've heard from the black creative community in Hollywood is, `Why is there no black-owned film studio where a black person green-lights the movies?
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,New York Times News Service | August 19, 1993
NEW YORK -- Lean, grizzled and grateful for life, Harvey Weinstein described yesterday his frightening passage from kidnapping crypt to freedom regained, lingering over a despairing plea that his kidnappers at least leave his dead body to be claimed by loved ones."
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | April 8, 2008
Of course, the most brutish part of my job is having to sit with men like George Clooney and Bruce Willis for dinner. But somebody has to do it and that lucky somebody is sometimes me. The other night in 21, after the feisty Leatherheads movie premiere at MOMA, Oscar winners and glamorous VIPS were mixing it up with millionaires and their rich wives. Nay, some were billionaires! I did spy David and Julia Koch, Joan Ganz Cooney and Pete Peterson, Woody "he owns the Jets" Johnson and Suzanne Ircha, Samantha Boardman and Aby Rosen, Jeanne and Herb Siegel and John and Susan Gutfreund.
NEWS
May 27, 2007
Harvey Weinstein, 82 Tuxedo company executive Harvey Weinstein, a former tuxedo company executive who was buried alive for 12 days after being kidnapped in 1993, died May 13 in Manhattan after a lengthy illness. He was 82. Known as the "tuxedo king," Weinstein was CEO of Lord West, a company that manufactured formal wear. Weinstein retired in 1999. The abduction occurred Aug. 4, 1993. Fermin Rodriguez, a collar maker at Weinstein's company, and two accomplices, kidnapped Weinstein and buried him in a pit near the Hudson River.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 14, 2006
For decades, Hollywood observers have said African-Americans and whites would not operate on a level playing field - or sound stage - until the ranks of studio executives and producers opened to black talents. Yesterday, Robert Johnson, founder of Black Entertainment Television, moved to even the landscape. He announced the formation of Our Stories Films, a company dedicated to producing African-American family comedies. He's chosen partners who've proven themselves at making fresh inroads with audiences and moviemakers: Bob and Harvey Weinstein, co-founders of Miramax and co-chairmen of the Weinstein Co. "The one consistent cry I've heard from the black creative community in Hollywood is, `Why is there no black-owned film studio where a black person green-lights the movies?
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | August 24, 1993
New York. -- "Hugs Finest, Thanks God, Loves N.Y.'' was one of the orgy of headlines -- this one in the Daily News -- that celebrated the homecoming of Harvey Weinstein. He is the city's greatest hero because he did what most of us hope to do these days: He survived.And, in case anyone missed the point of why we cheer the kidnapped tuxedo maven imprisoned in a pit along the West Side Highway, we saw the alternate ending along Interstate 95 in North Carolina. James Jordan, the father of the most famous athlete in the country, was shot to death in cold blood because he happened to stop at the wrong spot along the main street of the eastern United States.
NEWS
By Francis X. Clines and Francis X. Clines,New York Times News Service | August 19, 1993
NEW YORK -- Lean, grizzled and grateful for life, Harvey Weinstein described yesterday his frightening passage from kidnapping crypt to freedom regained, lingering over a despairing plea that his kidnappers at least leave his dead body to be claimed by loved ones."
NEWS
By Newsday | August 19, 1993
NEW YORK -- While he sometimes lost hope, Harvey Weinstein never lost his fighting spirit during the 12 days he was entombed in a darkened pit.At an emotional news conference yesterday with New York Mayor David N. Dinkins, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly and the detectives who set him free, an unshaven Mr. Weinstein embraced the men to whom he owes his life and said his rescue "redoubled" his feelings of pride in New York."
NEWS
By Newsday | August 17, 1993
NEW YORK -- For 12 excruciating days and nights, New York clothing executive Harvey Weinstein clung to life inside a tiny dark pit, 14 feet below a secluded rail yard in Upper Manhattan, where a band of kidnappers had left him to die.He survived by eating fruit, mostly bananas, that the kidnappers lowered to him until they received the requested ransom money.The one-time Marine lay in total darkness, his legs in shackles; at times, so were his arms.He made tape recordings at his captors' instruction, pleading with his children to pay a $3 million ransom.
NEWS
May 3, 2004
On Friday, April 30, 2004, RAY WEINSTEIN (nee Dalevitz); beloved wife of the late Harvey Weinstein; loving mother of Alan Weinstein of Arlington, VA and Fern Friedel of Baltimore, MD; dear mother-in-law of Sharon Weinstein and Dr. Samuel Friedel; adored sister of Esther Meliker of Baltimore, MD and Evelyn Heneson of Jacksonville, FL; dear sister-in-law of Bernard Heneson and the late Morris Meliker; loving grandmother of Jennifer and Renee Friedel....
FEATURES
By Amy Wallace and Amy Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 15, 2000
HOLLYWOOD -- Few people outside his family knew it, but Steven Spielberg was sick. Earlier this month, the 52-year-old Oscar-winning filmmaker checked into the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where doctors removed one of his kidneys, and no one in the media or the public had a clue. Word got out last week, four days after Spielberg's operation, when publicist Marvin Levy released a statement citing a kidney "irregularity." Spielberg was at home recuperating and even "doing some work," Levy said, and no follow-up treatment was needed.
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