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Harvey Milk

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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 5, 2008
We are on the verge of receiving a movie titled Milk. It will open Oct. 29 in the Castro District of San Francisco with a great cast playing the roles of the real-life protagonists in the story of the late Harvey Milk. In case you've forgotten, Milk was the first openly gay city supervisor of San Francisco. He was assassinated, along with Mayor George Moscone, in 1978, becoming a martyr to the cause against sexual discrimination. The 1984 documentary The Times of Harvey Milk won an Academy Award and was then made into an opera.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009
ARTS 'Nebiur Arellano: Timeless Filigree' Pre-Colombian art is the inspiration for much of the work in Nebiur Arellano: Timeless Filigree, an exhibit of 37 paintings by the Peruvian-born artist that runs through Saturday at the Mansion at Strathmore, 10701 Rockville Pike in North Bethesda. Also ending on Saturday at Strathmore is an eco-friendly exhibit titled Works by Alice Hui & Jane Brashares, featuring sculpture and pottery by Hui and "organic art" by Brashares. Admission to the galleries is free.
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FEATURES
November 27, 2007
Nov. 27 1978 San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk, a gay-rights activist, were shot to death inside City Hall by former supervisor Dan White.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2008
Bolt What it's about : A dog who plays a superhero on TV thinks he is one in real life, which presents all sorts of problems. Rated: PG The scoop : The script is smart, its conceit a heart-tugger in the finest of senses, and it's the first Disney effort in way too long to be more concerned with being a movie than with being a breeding ground for product tie-ins. Grade ***: 1/2 The Day the Earth Stood Still What it's about : Klaatu (Keanu Reeves, above), an alien in human form, and Gort, his bioengineered protector, want to save Earth, because it's one of the few orbs capable of supporting complex life.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1997
Those who long to re-live the '70s are urged to check out TNT today, and all week, then perhaps re-think their position."L.A. Johns" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Brittney Powell is a high-priced call girl (she's also "fiercely independent," according to Fox) in the service of Madame Jacqueline (Deborah Harry), "a shrewd businesswoman who knows how to manipulate her clients and girls to maximize her bottom line." A host of men stop by and tell all about their little idiosyncrasies.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009
ARTS 'Nebiur Arellano: Timeless Filigree' Pre-Colombian art is the inspiration for much of the work in Nebiur Arellano: Timeless Filigree, an exhibit of 37 paintings by the Peruvian-born artist that runs through Saturday at the Mansion at Strathmore, 10701 Rockville Pike in North Bethesda. Also ending on Saturday at Strathmore is an eco-friendly exhibit titled Works by Alice Hui & Jane Brashares, featuring sculpture and pottery by Hui and "organic art" by Brashares. Admission to the galleries is free.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2008
Bolt What it's about : A dog who plays a superhero on TV thinks he is one in real life, which presents all sorts of problems. Rated: PG The scoop : The script is smart, its conceit a heart-tugger in the finest of senses, and it's the first Disney effort in way too long to be more concerned with being a movie than with being a breeding ground for product tie-ins. Grade ***: 1/2 Cadillac Records What it's about : Leonard Chess, a self-made Chicago "record man," puts Muddy Waters and then Chuck Berry on the nation's turntables, thus inventing rock 'n' roll.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2008
Bolt What it's about : A dog who plays a superhero on TV thinks he is one in real life, which presents all sorts of problems when he unexpectedly finds himself in New York, a continent away from his beloved owner, Penny. Rated: PG The scoop : The script is smart, its conceit a heart-tugger in the finest of senses, and it's the first Disney effort in way too long to be more concerned with being a movie than with being a breeding ground for product tie-ins. Grade ***: 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | October 8, 2000
Once upon a time, new operas were nearly as plentiful as old ones. Opera companies and their audiences could not get enough of fresh material. Composers kept up with the demand by churning out works at superhuman speed, sometimes more than one a year. By the 20th century, though, the craving for novelty lessened considerably. People preferred to cuddle up with good old reliable Mozart, Verdi or Wagner, rather than risk their ears on something unknown. This reluctance to try out new operas became particularly pervasive in this country, making it harder and harder for an opera company to break away from standard repertoire and slip in a just-composed score.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 5, 2008
M ilk rests so exclusively - and solidly - on its performances, especially Sean Penn's marvelous characterization of Harvey Milk, that audiences won't realize how strong its mojo is until an assassin's bullets break the spell. It's not a great movie, but it is an enlivening and unusual one: an effervescent political film that also packs a knockout punch. As Milk, Penn provides the most embracing, democratic portrait of an American figure since Henry Fonda's young Abe Lincoln - and Fonda was playing Lincoln in his lawyer days.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 2008
Bolt What it's about : A dog who plays a superhero on TV thinks he is one in real life, which presents all sorts of problems when he unexpectedly finds himself in New York, a continent away from his beloved owner, Penny. Rated: PG The scoop : The script is smart, its conceit a heart-tugger in the finest of senses, and it's the first Disney effort in way too long to be more concerned with being a movie than with being a breeding ground for product tie-ins. Grade ***: 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS)
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 5, 2008
M ilk rests so exclusively - and solidly - on its performances, especially Sean Penn's marvelous characterization of Harvey Milk, that audiences won't realize how strong its mojo is until an assassin's bullets break the spell. It's not a great movie, but it is an enlivening and unusual one: an effervescent political film that also packs a knockout punch. As Milk, Penn provides the most embracing, democratic portrait of an American figure since Henry Fonda's young Abe Lincoln - and Fonda was playing Lincoln in his lawyer days.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | August 5, 2008
We are on the verge of receiving a movie titled Milk. It will open Oct. 29 in the Castro District of San Francisco with a great cast playing the roles of the real-life protagonists in the story of the late Harvey Milk. In case you've forgotten, Milk was the first openly gay city supervisor of San Francisco. He was assassinated, along with Mayor George Moscone, in 1978, becoming a martyr to the cause against sexual discrimination. The 1984 documentary The Times of Harvey Milk won an Academy Award and was then made into an opera.
FEATURES
November 27, 2007
Nov. 27 1978 San Francisco Mayor George Moscone and City Supervisor Harvey Milk, a gay-rights activist, were shot to death inside City Hall by former supervisor Dan White.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | October 8, 2000
Once upon a time, new operas were nearly as plentiful as old ones. Opera companies and their audiences could not get enough of fresh material. Composers kept up with the demand by churning out works at superhuman speed, sometimes more than one a year. By the 20th century, though, the craving for novelty lessened considerably. People preferred to cuddle up with good old reliable Mozart, Verdi or Wagner, rather than risk their ears on something unknown. This reluctance to try out new operas became particularly pervasive in this country, making it harder and harder for an opera company to break away from standard repertoire and slip in a just-composed score.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 17, 1997
Those who long to re-live the '70s are urged to check out TNT today, and all week, then perhaps re-think their position."L.A. Johns" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Brittney Powell is a high-priced call girl (she's also "fiercely independent," according to Fox) in the service of Madame Jacqueline (Deborah Harry), "a shrewd businesswoman who knows how to manipulate her clients and girls to maximize her bottom line." A host of men stop by and tell all about their little idiosyncrasies.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow | January 16, 2009
Milk : *** 1/2 ( 3 1/2 STARS) It may not be a masterpiece, but it does feature masterly performances from Sean Penn as pioneering gay politician Harvey Milk, James Franco as his most serious lover, and Josh Brolin as Milk's antagonist, Dan White. With Barack Obama's inauguration Tuesday, there's no better way to celebrate the rise of a community organizer than with this moving testament to the progress won by a man who understood building power from the ground up. Opening next friday Inkheart : (Warner Bros.
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