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By Sandy Grady and Sandy Grady,Washington columnist for Philadelphia Daily News | October 15, 1990
Raleigh, N.C. --HARVEY GANTT was looking out his Holiday Inn window when he heard the siren-blasting presidential motorcade sweep past.Riding in the limo beside George Bush, wearing a Cheshire-Cat grin, was the man Gantt hopes to upset in four weeks, Sen. Jesse Helms.A classic moment: The political outsider watching the entrenched insider roll past with all the trappings of pomp and power.Harvey Gantt was more wryly bemused than bitter."I'm delighted to be in the same town with Helms," he said.
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NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | March 20, 1995
You needed that job and you were the best qualified. But they had to give it to a minority because of a racial quota. Is that really fair?-- From a television ad Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C., used when he was behind in the polls in his 1990 reelection bid against African-American Harvey Gantt.We have always factored in . . . that race would probably play a role. We obviously may have miscalculated on how much it would play a role.?3 -- Harvey Gantt, after losing to Senator Helms. THE NEXT THING you know, great suffering masses of white people will march on Washington, singing "We Are Overwhelmed."
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NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 31, 1990
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. -- Shelby Williams is, as he puts it, "a third-generation Carolinian and a lifelong Democrat." He thinks Sen. Jesse Helms is "a big bag of wind."But if you press him on whether he intends to vote for Democrat Harvey Gantt, he becomes uneasy and begins to sweat in the chill sundown air. "Well," he says, "I always make up my mind at the last minute, and I haven't decided yet. It's a big step."Because Gantt is a black man? "Well," says Shelby Williams, "there is that."Indeed there is. Coming to the wire, the campaign for the Senate here this year, arguably the most intriguing of 1990 politics, is looking more and more like the campaign for governor of Virginia last year.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic Party is being tied into knots by the affirmative action issue.At the most basic level, the party's dilemma is clear-cut. On the one hand, the Democrats must recognize there is a deep-seated resentment of affirmative action among many white voters who consider it "reverse discrimination" that denies them jobs and promotions. On the other, the Democrats cannot alienate its most loyal constituency, black voters.The potential for defections among black voters is obvious.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | November 8, 1990
IN THE last campaign hours, Harvey Gantt had stood in front of wildly cheering, foot-stomping, flag-waving crowds to shout:"This time he isn't going to get away with it!"He was wrong.The truth came at midnight when a beaten but defiant Gantt told his campaign workers, "I'm still smiling deep down although I hurt inside. I know we gave it our best."Once again Sen. Jesse Helms, the muffin-faced Houdini of the New Right, had pulled off an 11th-hour escape.Once again the pollsters had said Helms' back was against the wall.
NEWS
By Derrick Z. Jackson | March 20, 1995
You needed that job and you were the best qualified. But they had to give it to a minority because of a racial quota. Is that really fair?-- From a television ad Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C., used when he was behind in the polls in his 1990 reelection bid against African-American Harvey Gantt.We have always factored in . . . that race would probably play a role. We obviously may have miscalculated on how much it would play a role.?3 -- Harvey Gantt, after losing to Senator Helms. THE NEXT THING you know, great suffering masses of white people will march on Washington, singing "We Are Overwhelmed."
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 7, 1990
RALEIGH, N.C.-- A few days ago, in the heat of a rigorous campaign, Sen. Jesse Helms declared that God was on his side. He also had $16 million, a black opponent in a mostly white state, and a knack for jabbing political erogenous zones with the sharp stick of negative advertising.Yesterday the voters of North Carolina decided that the combination was a winner, and returned Mr. Helms to the Senate for a fourth term over former Charlotte Mayor Harvey Gantt by a surprisingly comfortable margin.
NEWS
By Jim Fain | November 5, 1990
THANKS TO President Bush's goal-line stand against taxing millionaires, the Democrats go into Tuesday's mid-term election in better shape than anyone dreamed. Instead of losing two or three Senate seats, as seemed inevitable last summer, they are almost sure to break even and may even gain one or two.In the House, they should increase their lopsided majority by five to 10. They have 50-50 shots at governorships in the mega-redistricting states of California, Texas and Florida, plus surprisingly strong challenges in Ohio and Illinois.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 16, 1990
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. -- When Harvey Gantt strode up for a reception at a local motel here the other day, the cluster of newsmen outside was nearly as large as the group of supporters waiting inside.Reporters are being drawn to North Carolina by the mostirresistible story line of this election year:the possibility that Jesse Helms, the most conservative member of the Senate, an old bull of the Old South who resisted the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, might be retired by Mr. Gantt, a product of the New South, a former two-term mayor of Charlotte who happens to be black.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | March 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Democratic Party is being tied into knots by the affirmative action issue.At the most basic level, the party's dilemma is clear-cut. On the one hand, the Democrats must recognize there is a deep-seated resentment of affirmative action among many white voters who consider it "reverse discrimination" that denies them jobs and promotions. On the other, the Democrats cannot alienate its most loyal constituency, black voters.The potential for defections among black voters is obvious.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady | November 8, 1990
IN THE last campaign hours, Harvey Gantt had stood in front of wildly cheering, foot-stomping, flag-waving crowds to shout:"This time he isn't going to get away with it!"He was wrong.The truth came at midnight when a beaten but defiant Gantt told his campaign workers, "I'm still smiling deep down although I hurt inside. I know we gave it our best."Once again Sen. Jesse Helms, the muffin-faced Houdini of the New Right, had pulled off an 11th-hour escape.Once again the pollsters had said Helms' back was against the wall.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 7, 1990
RALEIGH, N.C.-- A few days ago, in the heat of a rigorous campaign, Sen. Jesse Helms declared that God was on his side. He also had $16 million, a black opponent in a mostly white state, and a knack for jabbing political erogenous zones with the sharp stick of negative advertising.Yesterday the voters of North Carolina decided that the combination was a winner, and returned Mr. Helms to the Senate for a fourth term over former Charlotte Mayor Harvey Gantt by a surprisingly comfortable margin.
NEWS
By Jim Fain | November 5, 1990
THANKS TO President Bush's goal-line stand against taxing millionaires, the Democrats go into Tuesday's mid-term election in better shape than anyone dreamed. Instead of losing two or three Senate seats, as seemed inevitable last summer, they are almost sure to break even and may even gain one or two.In the House, they should increase their lopsided majority by five to 10. They have 50-50 shots at governorships in the mega-redistricting states of California, Texas and Florida, plus surprisingly strong challenges in Ohio and Illinois.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 31, 1990
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. -- Shelby Williams is, as he puts it, "a third-generation Carolinian and a lifelong Democrat." He thinks Sen. Jesse Helms is "a big bag of wind."But if you press him on whether he intends to vote for Democrat Harvey Gantt, he becomes uneasy and begins to sweat in the chill sundown air. "Well," he says, "I always make up my mind at the last minute, and I haven't decided yet. It's a big step."Because Gantt is a black man? "Well," says Shelby Williams, "there is that."Indeed there is. Coming to the wire, the campaign for the Senate here this year, arguably the most intriguing of 1990 politics, is looking more and more like the campaign for governor of Virginia last year.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 16, 1990
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. -- When Harvey Gantt strode up for a reception at a local motel here the other day, the cluster of newsmen outside was nearly as large as the group of supporters waiting inside.Reporters are being drawn to North Carolina by the mostirresistible story line of this election year:the possibility that Jesse Helms, the most conservative member of the Senate, an old bull of the Old South who resisted the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, might be retired by Mr. Gantt, a product of the New South, a former two-term mayor of Charlotte who happens to be black.
NEWS
By Sandy Grady and Sandy Grady,Washington columnist for Philadelphia Daily News | October 15, 1990
Raleigh, N.C. --HARVEY GANTT was looking out his Holiday Inn window when he heard the siren-blasting presidential motorcade sweep past.Riding in the limo beside George Bush, wearing a Cheshire-Cat grin, was the man Gantt hopes to upset in four weeks, Sen. Jesse Helms.A classic moment: The political outsider watching the entrenched insider roll past with all the trappings of pomp and power.Harvey Gantt was more wryly bemused than bitter."I'm delighted to be in the same town with Helms," he said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 8, 1990
Campaign strategists for some of the biggest losers in Tuesday's elections in battleground states like Massachusetts, Michigan and Minnesota said yesterday that they had detected defeats in internal polls on the eve of the voting.But they said it was too late to effectively counter the sinking fortunes of their candidates.late as Sunday, a poll commissioned by the Detroit News said that Gov. James J. Blanchard, D-Mich., was a comfortable 14 percentage points ahead of his Republican rival, John Engler.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | December 8, 1990
RALEIGH, N.C. -- When Representative Daniel T. Blue Jr. stepped to the well of the North Carolina House of Representatives yesterday to accept his party's nomination to be the modern-day South's first black speaker, it was the culmination of a career spent doing things "the North Carolina way" -- that is, through hard work and the polishing of a moderate image.But paradoxically, the seeds of Mr. Blue's victory also were sown in Harvey Gantt's defeat last month by Sen. Jesse Helms.The Helms-Gantt race for the U.S. Senate not only prompted a heavy turnout of black voters for Mr. Gantt but also sparked a backlash among many voters, who disagreed with Mr. Helms on abortion and other issues in normally Republican, suburban districts.
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