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Harvest Festival

NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
It's the first Sunday in November. Do you know how to turn your clocks back? It's also Samhain, a Celtic "cross-quarter day," halfway between the autumnal equinox and the winter solstice. It was celebrated as the start of winter and the new year. There were elements of a harvest festival, too, with large gatherings and bonfires, and a festival of the dead, with echoes in our Halloween.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | September 27, 2001
Fall Harvest Festival Welcome the fall season this weekend at Steppingstone Museum's Fall Harvest Festival and Craft Show. There will be hayrides and pony rides, craft booths, scarecrow-making and pumpkin-painting. Visitors can also bob for apples, take part in apple butter-making and apple cider-pressing. Live entertainment, including music, square dancing and clogging, will run throughout the festival. Winning entries in the apple-pie and pumpkin-pie contests will be on display. Tours of the museum will be offered, and refreshments will be available.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2004
Catonsville, 1864 Get an idea of what life was like as a Civil War-era American Saturday with the fourth annual Founder's Day Family Celebration. Sponsored by the Catonsville Historical Society, the celebration showcases Catonsville in 1864, when the Union Army marched down Frederick Road. Watch demonstrations of camp life, Civil War surgery, a cider press, fife and drum music and weaving. Use a telegraph, make a church doll, dress in period garb and drill like a soldier. The Founder's Day Family Celebration runs noon-4 p.m. Saturday at 1824 Frederick Road in Catonsville.
NEWS
By Lisa Anderson and Lisa Anderson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 22, 2006
NEW YORK -- One autumn day in 1621, newly arrived Pilgrims joined native Wampanoag Indians in Massachusetts' Plymouth Colony to share a harvest meal of thanksgiving, including roast turkey, pumpkin pie and an Indian-supplied delicacy, popcorn. From kindergartners acting in their first pageant to grandparents presiding over the family feast, most Americans know the story of Thanksgiving cold. And most of them would be wrong. It's time to talk turkey about Thanksgiving. While long immortalized in painting, poetry and song - and annually reinforced by chocolate turkeys, buckle-hatted Garfields on Hallmark cards and school re-enactments of the blessed banquet - the "first Thanksgiving" that gave rise to America's holiday tradition never occurred, at least not in the way most of us picture and understand it. There is no historical link between the harvest meal in 1621 and America's Thanksgiving narrative.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | September 21, 2000
Peabody Open House It's one thing to hear about a child prodigy, and it's quite another to actually hear one. Lots of small bodies with big talent will entertain visitors at the Peabody Open House on Sunday. Young violinists and pianists from the school will play chamber music, including students in the Young People's String Program. Also, the school's dance and early-childhood education departments will offer demonstrations for parents and children. Faculty member Angela Taylor will perform music with computers and lead a hands-on demonstration of new techniques.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jarrett Graver | October 23, 1997
Around the worldOffer your children a more sophisticated air this Saturday by taking them to the Chesapeake Children's Museum's first "Round the World Festival" at Anne Arundel Community College. The festival will expose children of all ages to various multicultural activities, including arts and crafts, storytelling, native dancing and games from around the globe. The silent auction allows patrons to bid on both international and local products, and area restaurants will provide tastes of ethnic and regional cuisine.
NEWS
By From staff reports | October 4, 1999
In Baltimore City Lottery winner has until tomorrow to claim $150,000 prize The holder of a winning Big Game lottery ticket sold in April at a Southwest Baltimore store has until tomorrow to claim the $150,000 prize, Maryland Lottery officials say. The ticket is one of two unclaimed second-tier winning tickets from the April 6 drawing. A Boston woman won the record $197 million jackpot. The unclaimed tickets were sold at Hollinswood Check Cashing in the 2100 block of W. Patapsco Ave. and Sukhee Citgo in Elkton, Cecil County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julia Furlong and Julia Furlong,SUN STAFF | October 2, 2003
Looking for a fun family outing that even mom and dad will deem sweet? Oregon Ridge Nature Center's Honey Harvest Festival will come to the rescue Saturday and Sunday. Whether you are looking for a taste of history or a little local flavor, everyone will be able to find something to their fancy at this annual event. Members of the Central Maryland Beekeepers' Association (CMBA) will display their many wares and offer demonstrations of honeybee-related activities such as candle dipping, honey extraction and mead making.
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