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By hippodromehatter@aol.com | June 19, 2011
I wanted to add fresh herbs to a salad and so while stretching across our herb garden for some sprigs that were just beyond my reach, I fell face first into our oregano patch. Typically, I would have been annoyed. But instead, I was all smiles, no doubt because I had fallen into what the ancient Greeks knew as "happiness plants. " "Oregano" means "joy of the mountains" in Greek, and Greece's mountainsides are where oregano is native and where it's been used as a culinary and medicinal herb for centuries.
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Tim Wheeler | October 1, 2014
Oyster season opened on a tentative note Wednesday, amid doubts about whether a two-year rebound in the commercial harvest of the Chesapeake Bay's bivalves could continue. There appeared to be fewer watermen working Wednesday in Broad Creek, an Eastern Shore tributary of the Choptank River where more than 120 boats congregated on opening day last year, according to Drew Koslow, the Choptank Riverkeeper. Watermen said the oysters they were pulling up with scissor-like tongs seemed to be smaller, too. "We're not expecting the catch to be as good as it was last year," said P.T. Hambleton, who runs a seafood business in Bozman.  Watermen who'd checked reefs before the season started found oysters smaller than what they'd pulled up last fall, Hambleton said.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
There is a statewide moratorium on the harvest of river herring, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. The halt includes blueback and alewife herring, according to a DNR statement Friday. The moratorium has been in effect since Dec. 26. The Atlantic Coast river herring stock is managed by a multi-state commission. Each state from Maine to Florida was required to institute a fishing stop for herring by Jan. 1 unless a state-specific management plan demonstrated sustainability.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
September's full moon arrives at 9:38 p.m. Monday , known as both the Corn and Harvest moon. American Indians named it the Corn moon for coinciding with the crop's harvest, whereas the Harvest moon can fall in September or October, depending on which full moon is closest to the autumnal equinox, Sept. 23 this year. It is the third of three consecutive "supermoons," as it coincides with lunar perigee, when the moon is closest to Earth in its orbit. Such a coincidence can make the moon look larger and brighter than when full moons are closer to apogee, their furthest point from Earth, though it can be hard to tell with the naked eye. The celestial wonders don't stop there -- next month's full moon is not far from being considered a supermoon, and it coincides with a lunar eclipse that can give the moon a reddish hue, dubbed a "Blood Moon.
NEWS
February 10, 2010
In his Feb. 7 op-ed "Oysters vs. Watermen," Christopher White claims the State's proposed Oyster Restoration and Aquaculture Development plan will broaden aquaculture "to the exclusion of a wild harvest." This is absolutely not true; in fact, the plan maintains 75 percent of the bay's most productive oyster bottom for the wild fishery. The new plan, developed under the leadership of Gov. Martin O'Malley sets a course of action that will rebuild oyster populations for the bay, protect current jobs, and set a more sustainable course for both oysters and our oyster industry.
EXPLORE
March 6, 2012
Harford County Executive David R. Craig and Harford County Government are partnering with the Postal Service to support the Harvest for the Hungry campaign. The local campaign is coordinated through the Harford Community Action Agency. "The annual Harvest for the Hungry campaign is a great opportunity for county employees, their families and friends to help support members of our community," Craig said in a press release. "The Harford Community Action Agency and the Harvest for the Hungry campaign do an outstanding job gathering food to support those in our community who turn to us for help in time of need.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | December 26, 2013
Et cetera 2-week firearm deer harvest up from 2012 Hunters reported killing 36,942 deer during the statewide, two-week firearm deer season, which ended Dec. 14, the Maryland Department of Natural Resources said. This harvest represents a 2percent increase compared with the 36,127 deer killed during the 2012 season. Overall, hunters reported seeing more deer than last year in many parts of the state, but challenging weather reduced the harvest slightly. Region A deer hunters reported 4,179 deer harvested, up 5 percent; the Region B deer harvest increased 2 percent, to 32,763.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | November 10, 2013
Maryland hunters have killed considerably more turkeys and deer than this time last year because of better conditions, the Department of Natural Resources said late last week. Hunters completed the early portions of the archery and muzzleloader deer seasons by harvesting 28,023 deer during September and October - 26 percent higher than last year's below-average harvest of 22,283 for the period. Last year's low harvest was attributable to an abundant acorn crop, which resulted in deer moving less in search of food, the DNR said.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
A plan to reduce fishing for Atlantic menhaden along the East Coast moved ahead Wednesday, though the scale of the cutback came into question amid new doubts about how much overfishing has hurt the economically and ecologically important species. A panel of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, which regulates all inshore fishing from Maine to Florida, voted to seek public comment on whether to slash the commercial catch of menhaden by up to 50 percent, though it left the door open to making smaller cuts.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | May 30, 2012
It was while she was serving dinner to her kids in 2008 and their dad was out campaigning for president, that Michelle Obama hatched a modest daydream: a vegetable garden on the White House grounds. She'd recently had a conversation with her children's pediatrician about their eating habits, and the poor health of children he was seeing in his practice. It shook her up — he was treating obesity and diabetes in kids — and she resolved to make better food choices for her family. She never said anything to Barack Obama about a vegetable garden (she told interviewers this week that she didn't want to jinx things with a "what if" question)
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
Lawrence "Daniel" Murphy, 37, of St. Michaels pleaded guilty Friday to illegally harvesting striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. He served periodically as a helper on the Kristin Marie between 2007 and 2012 with Tilghman Island watermen Michael D. Hayden, Jr. and William J. Lednum. In early 2011, he, Hayden and Lednum attempted to harvest more than 20,000 pounds of striped bass using illegal, unattended and unmarked weighted gill nets fish around "Bloody Point" on the bay before the season was opened.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 21, 2014
Angus Phillips, an inveterate Annapolis-area crabber, joined my call for a moratorium on the harvest of blue crabs from the Chesapeake Bay. "The time has come," he wrote in The Washington Post last month, "to stop pussyfooting around and shut down crabbing for a few years, to give the delectable crustaceans a chance to recover the way geese, yellow perch and rockfish did. " Phillips wrote about fishing and hunting for 30-plus years at The Post...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
2500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting - shell deposits called middens - indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C. 1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them. 1700s: Around 1700, oyster harvesters began using tongs to retrieve oysters from the water.
NEWS
May 7, 2014
While I seldom agree with columnist Dan Rodricks , his commentary on the Chesapeake Bay's declining crab population hit the nail on the head ( "It's time to stop tinkering and just ban crabbing for one year," May 3). My family is from the Eastern Shore, and I grew up appreciating the marvelous bounty that comes from the Chesapeake Bay. However, the bay needs a rest. A three-year moratorium on crab harvesting would be ideal, but I'll take whatever I can get. Additionally, there should be a permanent ban on commercial harvesting of female crabs.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | May 3, 2014
A couple of years ago, the governor of Maryland stood on a dock on South River, a bushel of steamed crabs at his feet, telling everyone it was OK to eat Chesapeake blue crabs again - sort of like the mayor in "Jaws" telling everyone it was OK to go back in the water. "I am glad to report that the population of the blue crab is now at a 19-year high," the governor said in April 2012. There was so much excitement about the comeback of the blue crab that the state launched a "True Blue" marketing campaign, identifying and promoting restaurants and markets selling Chesapeake lump.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Five Queen Anne's County watermen have been charged with illegally taking 51 bushels of oysters from a protected area near the mouth of the Wicomico River in Tangier Sound, Maryland Department of Natural Resources officials said. Acting on a tip, Natural Resources Police officers used radar and cameras to track several boats tonging in the Evans Oyster Harvest Reserve Area, they said. The waterman charged are: Ryan Daniel Baxter, 20, of Queen Anne; Benjamin Leonard Reihl, 26, of Rock Hall; Adam Vincent Reihl, 21, of Church Hill; Harvey Thomas Bowers, 49, of Chestertown, and George Albert Lee, 45, of Dominion.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1994
The Chesapeake Bay's disease-battered oyster industry continues its downward slide, with record-low harvests this season in Maryland and Virginia.Landings of oysters reported in Maryland for the season that ends today are expected to be only 70,000 bushels, down 40 percent from the previous year's record poor catch, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.In Virginia, meanwhile, the harvest of market-size oysters from publicly owned river bottom has fallen to about 6,000 bushels, from 40,000 the year before, according to the Virginia Marine Resources Commission.
NEWS
November 27, 2003
After a year of great sickness and little food, the Pilgrims who had settled in New England were rescued by a good harvest in the fall of 1621. Fifty-two English settlers celebrated the harvest with more than 90 of their Wampanoag Indian neighbors. In later years, the feast would be called the new country's first Thanksgiving, even though the Pilgrims did not have a regular Thanksgiving themselves. Today, their colony in Plymouth, Mass., is commemorated with Plimoth Plantation, a re-creation of the original settlement as it would have been in 1627.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | February 15, 2014
The Annapolis Yacht Club was presented with the Captain Joe Prosser Award at the US Sailing Leadership Forum earlier this month in San Diego. The Prosser Award was created in recognition of the Merchant Marine Academy's first sailing master, Captain C.A. "Joe" Prosser, USMS, and is awarded each year to an organization that, in the opinion of the U.S. Training Committee, has made an exemplary contribution toward "improving the quality and safety in...
NEWS
Aegis staff report | January 17, 2014
An Ace Hardware Express will open in early February inside the existing Harvest Fare grocery store in Fallston, at the intersection of Routes 1 and 152. This will be the first store of its kind in the state, but the precedent has already been set in other states such as Texas, where combination hardware and grocery store operations have been successful, according to press release from Harvest Fare. The location of the hardware store is expected to allow customers to avoid heavy Bel Air traffic.
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