Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHarvard Yard
IN THE NEWS

Harvard Yard

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | October 3, 1991
THERE IS A PLAY somewhere in ''Park Your Car in Harvard Yard,'' but the director and the producers will have do some additional work to find it.They might begin with the length of the play, one that opened last evening at the Mechanic. At present, the comedy-drama runs for some two hours and 35 minutes. That's about average for most plays, but in this case, it is far too much running time. Tightening is in order.''Park Your Car in Harvard Yard,'' set in Gloucester, Mass., is a long time getting to the plot.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Tony Brown | August 22, 2014
My sophomore year Harvard announced a cost-cutting measure that made the news. Going forward the school would continue to provide toilet paper to freshmen dorms, but upper classmen would have to provide for themselves. Almost immediately, toilet paper began disappearing from buildings all over campus. One Monday night my roommate and I discovered that we were low on supplies, so after dinner we walked up the hill to Harvard Yard to visit the freshmen dorms. In a building with communal bathrooms (where we could easily lay hands on a few rolls)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 25, 1991
The changes made during the pre-Broadway run of Israel fTC Horovitz's "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard" become apparent even before the play begins -- there is a pre-curtain announcement that the running time is 1 hour and 45 minutes, and there will be no intermission.This is a full hour shorter than the production Mechanic Theatre audiences saw three weeks ago when "Park Your Car" began its one-month run. In other words, 45 minutes, as well as the 15-minute intermission, have been trimmed from this story of the uneasy relationship between a retired high school teacher (Jason Robards)
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 18, 2013
When workers attached a construction elevator to the Art Deco brick skin of downtown Baltimore's 10 Light Street this week, this amazing commercial landmark began its path to becoming a home to residents in a newly forming city neighborhood. I navigated the construction fence — parts of both Light and Redwood streets are temporarily closed — and found Cary M. Euwer Jr., the building's new owner, at work in what had been a former Bank of America office. Euwer is president and CEO of Metropolitan Partnership, the Reston, Va., development firm that bought the old Baltimore Trust Co. property and is now converting it to 445 apartments.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 12, 1991
"Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," the Israel Horovitz play tha had a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre last month, opened at Broadway's Music Box Theatre last week to mixed negative reviews, most of which faulted the script but admired the performances of stars Jason Robards and Judith Ivey.The Associated Press's Michael Kuchwara called this story of a retired high school teacher and his live-in housekeeper a "wisp of play . . . so devoid of drama that it looks to its two actors for any sense of theatricality."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 3, 1991
Near the end of the first act of "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," there's a deliciously cathartic scene in which the live-in housekeeper for a cantankerous retired schoolteacher finally tells him off to his face -- a safe proposition since his hearing aid has given out.Israel Horovitz' new bittersweet comedy -- which opened a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre last night -- is about two strong-willed New Englanders of opposite temperaments and cultural...
NEWS
By Brandon Terry | April 3, 2005
I first came to Harvard for Prospective Students' Weekend in April of 2001. My mother's erroneous weather forecast had me dressed for a cold Massachusetts weekend, but as I emerged from the subway, I was hit with the discomfort of wearing a giant winter coat in Cambridge's unseasonably warm, 70-degree weather. Carrying luggage and sweating profusely, I struggled onto Harvard Yard, a grass pasture surrounded by buildings that bear the names of the richest, whitest and deadest men in history.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | October 18, 2013
When workers attached a construction elevator to the Art Deco brick skin of downtown Baltimore's 10 Light Street this week, this amazing commercial landmark began its path to becoming a home to residents in a newly forming city neighborhood. I navigated the construction fence — parts of both Light and Redwood streets are temporarily closed — and found Cary M. Euwer Jr., the building's new owner, at work in what had been a former Bank of America office. Euwer is president and CEO of Metropolitan Partnership, the Reston, Va., development firm that bought the old Baltimore Trust Co. property and is now converting it to 445 apartments.
NEWS
By Tony Brown | August 22, 2014
My sophomore year Harvard announced a cost-cutting measure that made the news. Going forward the school would continue to provide toilet paper to freshmen dorms, but upper classmen would have to provide for themselves. Almost immediately, toilet paper began disappearing from buildings all over campus. One Monday night my roommate and I discovered that we were low on supplies, so after dinner we walked up the hill to Harvard Yard to visit the freshmen dorms. In a building with communal bathrooms (where we could easily lay hands on a few rolls)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 29, 1991
The name Jason Robards conjures up images of the hard-living, hard-drinking characters of Eugene O'Neill -- Hickey, the traveling salesman, in "The Iceman Cometh" or Jamie Tyrone in "Long Day's Journey Into Night" and "The Moon for the Misbegotten."But what has him excited these days is "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," Israel Horovitz's new play, which is being billed as "touchingly funny" -- and which begins a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.Is this casting against type?
NEWS
By Brandon Terry | April 3, 2005
I first came to Harvard for Prospective Students' Weekend in April of 2001. My mother's erroneous weather forecast had me dressed for a cold Massachusetts weekend, but as I emerged from the subway, I was hit with the discomfort of wearing a giant winter coat in Cambridge's unseasonably warm, 70-degree weather. Carrying luggage and sweating profusely, I struggled onto Harvard Yard, a grass pasture surrounded by buildings that bear the names of the richest, whitest and deadest men in history.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 12, 1991
"Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," the Israel Horovitz play tha had a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre last month, opened at Broadway's Music Box Theatre last week to mixed negative reviews, most of which faulted the script but admired the performances of stars Jason Robards and Judith Ivey.The Associated Press's Michael Kuchwara called this story of a retired high school teacher and his live-in housekeeper a "wisp of play . . . so devoid of drama that it looks to its two actors for any sense of theatricality."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 25, 1991
The changes made during the pre-Broadway run of Israel fTC Horovitz's "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard" become apparent even before the play begins -- there is a pre-curtain announcement that the running time is 1 hour and 45 minutes, and there will be no intermission.This is a full hour shorter than the production Mechanic Theatre audiences saw three weeks ago when "Park Your Car" began its one-month run. In other words, 45 minutes, as well as the 15-minute intermission, have been trimmed from this story of the uneasy relationship between a retired high school teacher (Jason Robards)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 3, 1991
Near the end of the first act of "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," there's a deliciously cathartic scene in which the live-in housekeeper for a cantankerous retired schoolteacher finally tells him off to his face -- a safe proposition since his hearing aid has given out.Israel Horovitz' new bittersweet comedy -- which opened a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre last night -- is about two strong-willed New Englanders of opposite temperaments and cultural...
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | October 3, 1991
THERE IS A PLAY somewhere in ''Park Your Car in Harvard Yard,'' but the director and the producers will have do some additional work to find it.They might begin with the length of the play, one that opened last evening at the Mechanic. At present, the comedy-drama runs for some two hours and 35 minutes. That's about average for most plays, but in this case, it is far too much running time. Tightening is in order.''Park Your Car in Harvard Yard,'' set in Gloucester, Mass., is a long time getting to the plot.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | September 29, 1991
The name Jason Robards conjures up images of the hard-living, hard-drinking characters of Eugene O'Neill -- Hickey, the traveling salesman, in "The Iceman Cometh" or Jamie Tyrone in "Long Day's Journey Into Night" and "The Moon for the Misbegotten."But what has him excited these days is "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard," Israel Horovitz's new play, which is being billed as "touchingly funny" -- and which begins a pre-Broadway run at the Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.Is this casting against type?
FEATURES
By ROGER SIMON and ROGER SIMON,Roger Simon is a nationally syndicated columnist for The Sun. This excerpt is from his new book, "Road Show," published by Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Copyright 1990 by Roger Simon. Reprinted with permission | November 11, 1990
"By the time we're finished, they're going to wonder whether Willie Horton is Dukakis' running mate."--Lee AtwaterHe was big. He was black. He was every guy you ever crossed street to avoid, every pair of smoldering eyes you ever looked away from on the bus or subway. He was every person you moved out of the city to escape, every sound in the night that made you get up and check the locks on the windows and grab the door handles and give them an extra tug.Whether you were white or black or red or yellow, Willie Horton was your worst nightmare.
FEATURES
July 23, 1991
The Morris A. Mechanic Theatre yesterday announced its full 1991-'92 season schedule. All performances will be at the Mechanic except "House of Flowers," a musical starring Patti LaBelle, which will be performed at the Lyric Opera House.Oct. 1-27: "Park Your Car in Harvard Yard."Oct. 29-Nov. 24: "My Fair Lady."Dec. 10-Jan. 5: "Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story."Jan. 7-Feb. 2: "A Few Good Men."Feb. 11-March 8: "House of Flowers."March 10-April 5: "Lost in Yonkers."May 12-June 6: "The Piano Lesson."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.