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November 8, 2009
DONALD BAIM, 60 Medical device executive Dr. Donald Baim, a renowned cardiologist and medical device executive, died Friday following surgery to treat a form of cancer, his family said. He was 60. Baim had undergone recent surgery to remove diseased tissue caused by adrenal cancer, a rare form of the disease that attacks the adrenal glands. Baim, a former Harvard medical school professor, most recently served as chief medical officer for Boston Scientific Corp., a leading manufacturer of pacemakers, defibrillators and other implants.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Dr. Raymond Seltser, former associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health who was the author of seminal epidemiological articles on smoking, stroke and radiation, died Feb. 16 of pneumonia at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. He was 90. The son of a tailor and a homemaker, Raymond Seltser was born and raised in Boston. He graduated from Boston Latin School in 1941. "His parents expected him to go into medicine, but he never wanted to practice," said a son, Barry Jay Seltser of Silver Spring.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Two brain scientists have emerged as the leading candidates to be director of the National Institutes of Health at a time when Congress is pouring money into the agency in hopes of unlocking the secrets of many diseases. Administration officials said yesterday that Donna E. Shalala, the secretary of health and human services, had identified the two neuroscientists as her candidates to lead the agency, the chief sponsor of biomedical research in the United States. The contenders are Dr. Gerald D. Fischbach, director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and Dr. Steven E. Hyman, director of the National Institute of Mental Health.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Dr. Theodore H. Wilson Jr., former chief of surgery at Union Memorial Hospital who earlier had been chief of surgery at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda and a captain in the Navy Medical Corps, died Monday of cancer at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. He was 91. "Ted was an amazing man and was just pure class from the way he ran the department to the way he treated people," said Dr. William H.B. Howard, a longtime Union Memorial Hospital surgeon and friend.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
Mercedes Linton Shriver, an ardent environmentalist and an artist whose designer silk wraps are sold worldwide, died Wednesday of internal injuries after a fall down a cliff while hiking one of her favorite trails near her home in Saint-Barthelemy. She was 41 and had lived on the small Caribbean island in the French West Indies for about five years. Born in Baltimore and known as Merc, Ms. Shriver was a graduate of Maryvale Preparatory School and studied art later at a variety of places, including the Maryland Institute College of Art, the San Francisco Art Institute and the Telluride AhHa School.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,tanika.white@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
After graduating from Harvard Medical School, Dr. Bill Thomas - exhausted from the pace of emergency room shifts - took a part-time job in a nursing home, thinking he could catch up on some nap time. Instead, the experience awakened in Thomas a desire to help the "elders" who had been relegated to nursing homes - places that he thought to be, by and large, cold, solitary and regimented. "When I went to work at the nursing home," he said, "I quickly discovered I could make life better for each and every person I was taking care of. "Because their problems didn't have to do with their medications.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
Education reformers should note Dan Rodricks ' column about schools that envisions "schools that are generators of progress in the neighborhoods where they stand" ( "Using the schools as leverage for neighborhoods," Oct. 31). It is a vision that better addresses what is needed in school reform than does the Common Core curriculum. Author Robert Weissberg, in "Bad Students, Not Bad Schools," clearly makes the case that the neighborhood has more influence on a school than the educators.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Dr. William R. Bell, an internationally known Johns Hopkins hematologist who conducted research into bleeding and clotting disorders, died Oct. 4 of complications from a blood clot at his Roland Park home. He was 78. "Bill was one of the premier hematologists of his era, hands down. He had an international reputation and was a master clinician," said Dr. Jerry L. Spivak, a Johns Hopkins Hospital hematologist who was chief of its hematology department from 1980 to 1992. "If you were ever sick, you'd want Bill Bell for your doctor.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 1, 2014
Dr. Raymond Seltser, former associate dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health who was the author of seminal epidemiological articles on smoking, stroke and radiation, died Feb. 16 of pneumonia at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. He was 90. The son of a tailor and a homemaker, Raymond Seltser was born and raised in Boston. He graduated from Boston Latin School in 1941. "His parents expected him to go into medicine, but he never wanted to practice," said a son, Barry Jay Seltser of Silver Spring.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2005
It's bad enough to have to fight a serious illness. But more and more Americans are finding that, just when they're at their physical and emotional lowest, they must also fight the system to get help paying their medical bills. Sometimes, that's because they have no health insurance. Marcia Soule, 59, of Carver, Mass., for instance, received a diagnosis of breast cancer late in 2003 and quickly ran up $25,000 worth of medical debt that she had no way of paying. But shockingly, most of the time, financial crisis comes for people who have health insurance but discover, while they're still reeling from bad medical news, that their insurance isn't as good as they thought.
NEWS
November 4, 2013
Education reformers should note Dan Rodricks ' column about schools that envisions "schools that are generators of progress in the neighborhoods where they stand" ( "Using the schools as leverage for neighborhoods," Oct. 31). It is a vision that better addresses what is needed in school reform than does the Common Core curriculum. Author Robert Weissberg, in "Bad Students, Not Bad Schools," clearly makes the case that the neighborhood has more influence on a school than the educators.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Dr. William R. Bell, an internationally known Johns Hopkins hematologist who conducted research into bleeding and clotting disorders, died Oct. 4 of complications from a blood clot at his Roland Park home. He was 78. "Bill was one of the premier hematologists of his era, hands down. He had an international reputation and was a master clinician," said Dr. Jerry L. Spivak, a Johns Hopkins Hospital hematologist who was chief of its hematology department from 1980 to 1992. "If you were ever sick, you'd want Bill Bell for your doctor.
NEWS
November 8, 2009
DONALD BAIM, 60 Medical device executive Dr. Donald Baim, a renowned cardiologist and medical device executive, died Friday following surgery to treat a form of cancer, his family said. He was 60. Baim had undergone recent surgery to remove diseased tissue caused by adrenal cancer, a rare form of the disease that attacks the adrenal glands. Baim, a former Harvard medical school professor, most recently served as chief medical officer for Boston Scientific Corp., a leading manufacturer of pacemakers, defibrillators and other implants.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,tanika.white@baltsun.com | August 31, 2008
After graduating from Harvard Medical School, Dr. Bill Thomas - exhausted from the pace of emergency room shifts - took a part-time job in a nursing home, thinking he could catch up on some nap time. Instead, the experience awakened in Thomas a desire to help the "elders" who had been relegated to nursing homes - places that he thought to be, by and large, cold, solitary and regimented. "When I went to work at the nursing home," he said, "I quickly discovered I could make life better for each and every person I was taking care of. "Because their problems didn't have to do with their medications.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 2005
It's bad enough to have to fight a serious illness. But more and more Americans are finding that, just when they're at their physical and emotional lowest, they must also fight the system to get help paying their medical bills. Sometimes, that's because they have no health insurance. Marcia Soule, 59, of Carver, Mass., for instance, received a diagnosis of breast cancer late in 2003 and quickly ran up $25,000 worth of medical debt that she had no way of paying. But shockingly, most of the time, financial crisis comes for people who have health insurance but discover, while they're still reeling from bad medical news, that their insurance isn't as good as they thought.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2003
Mercedes Linton Shriver, an ardent environmentalist and an artist whose designer silk wraps are sold worldwide, died Wednesday of internal injuries after a fall down a cliff while hiking one of her favorite trails near her home in Saint-Barthelemy. She was 41 and had lived on the small Caribbean island in the French West Indies for about five years. Born in Baltimore and known as Merc, Ms. Shriver was a graduate of Maryvale Preparatory School and studied art later at a variety of places, including the Maryland Institute College of Art, the San Francisco Art Institute and the Telluride AhHa School.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Dr. Theodore H. Wilson Jr., former chief of surgery at Union Memorial Hospital who earlier had been chief of surgery at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda and a captain in the Navy Medical Corps, died Monday of cancer at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville. He was 91. "Ted was an amazing man and was just pure class from the way he ran the department to the way he treated people," said Dr. William H.B. Howard, a longtime Union Memorial Hospital surgeon and friend.
NEWS
By Judy Foreman and Judy Foreman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
I was in the hospital for knee surgery and got a terrible rash on my back. The nurses said it was probably from chemicals used to launder the sheets. Is this true? It could be. These rashes happen "with enough frequency that we do see it. They're often due to the high amounts of bleach and whitening agents in the detergent" used in hospital laundering, said Dr. John Williams, a dermatologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. Commercial laundries use much harsher chemicals than people use at home, he said, and these agents can cause contact dermatitis, a rash that in most cases is simply a reaction to an irritating substance but 20 percent of the time is a genuine allergic reaction, in which immune cells gear up to fight the offending substance.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 25, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Two brain scientists have emerged as the leading candidates to be director of the National Institutes of Health at a time when Congress is pouring money into the agency in hopes of unlocking the secrets of many diseases. Administration officials said yesterday that Donna E. Shalala, the secretary of health and human services, had identified the two neuroscientists as her candidates to lead the agency, the chief sponsor of biomedical research in the United States. The contenders are Dr. Gerald D. Fischbach, director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, and Dr. Steven E. Hyman, director of the National Institute of Mental Health.
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