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By Justin Fenton and Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2011
Not too many of Adam Braskich's classmates at Harvard Law School this fall will have spent an afternoon quite like this. On a sweltering day inside a South Baltimore apartment, he stood over the body of an elderly man that was discovered by a friend. Trying to discern the man's identity and find his family, the officer and a medic picked through his possessions, looking for anything that might help. Another medic rushed out, overcome by the stench. Braskich, a 26-year-old native of Illinois who double-majored in criminal justice and philosophy at the University of Maryland, College Park, said he's enjoyed the past three years in the city's diverse neighborhoods, getting to know residents and drug dealers alike.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | May 15, 2014
Kurt L. Schmoke, the former mayor of Baltimore who will take over the presidency of University of Baltimore in July, will address graduates and their families at Anne Arundel Community College's 52nd Commencement at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 22. Schmoke has worked in law, education and public service, most recently as general counsel and interim provost at Howard University. On May 14, the University System Maryland Board of Regents announced Schmoke's appointment as president of University of Baltimore, effective July 1. Schmoke earned an undergraduate degree in history from Yale University.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 21, 2003
BOSTON - Snaps to the little girl leaving Legally Blonde 2 three steps behind me. There I was trying to figure out what happened to the original fizz when she said to her mom: "Don't you think she was dumber in his movie?" YESSS. And a middle-schooler shall lead us. As a blond by nature and nurture, I kind of liked the first Reese Witherspoon comedy about the sorority shopaholic dumped by a preppy boyfriend who told her, "If I'm going to be a senator by the time I'm 30, I need to marry a Jackie, not a Marilyn."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Robert R. Bowie, a lawyer who established what is now the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University, died Nov. 2 of respiratory failure at Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. He was 104. The son of Clarence Keating Bowie, a Baltimore lawyer, and Helen Richardson Bowie, a homemaker, Robert Richardson Bowie was born in Baltimore and raised on Calvert Street and in Guilford. After graduating in 1927 from the Gilman School, Mr. Bowie earned a bachelor's degree in 1931 from Princeton University and his law degree in 1934 from Harvard Law School.
NEWS
April 29, 2011
Why should President Obama have to show his birth certificate to prove he is an American citizen when other presidents have not been asked to show theirs? It seems that Donald Trump and all the other doubters are sideshow carnival barkers making much ado about nothing. Now that the world has seen the document, the naysayers will continue to doubt the president's authenticity as much as they always have. As for Mr. Trump's calling Obama's acceptance into Harvard Law School unfair because of his family income, that is ludicrous.
NEWS
August 5, 1992
NEWS THAT New Jersey entrepreneur Henry M. Rowan is donating $100 million to Glassboro State College has overshadowed a Baltimore native's equally noteworthy gift to Harvard Law School.Reginald F. Lewis, who was raised in West Baltimore and graduated from Dunbar High School, announced recently that he will be giving $3 million to Harvard Law School -- the largest single gift in the school's 175-year history.Mr. Lewis, 48, is not a well-known figure in Baltimore because most of his career has been spent in the boardrooms of New York and European capitals.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 27, 2013
I was saddened to read the obituaries for Anthony Lewis, the Pultizer Prize-winning reporter, columnist and author. He may be most familiar for his decades of work at the New York Times. But his book, "Gideon's Trumpet," was one of the first -- and best -- examples of literary journalism, which has flourished in the half-century that has followed its publication. In classic story-telling style, it explored a landmark Supreme Court case that granted legal representation to the poor, and was a forerunner of more current works such as Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air" or Rebecca Skloot's "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
FEATURES
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,SUN STAFF | April 10, 1996
When Derrick Bell walked away from a tenured position at Harvard Law School in a dispute over its hiring practices, he lost a job but gained a platform."
NEWS
Staff Reports | May 15, 2014
Kurt L. Schmoke, the former mayor of Baltimore who will take over the presidency of University of Baltimore in July, will address graduates and their families at Anne Arundel Community College's 52nd Commencement at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 22. Schmoke has worked in law, education and public service, most recently as general counsel and interim provost at Howard University. On May 14, the University System Maryland Board of Regents announced Schmoke's appointment as president of University of Baltimore, effective July 1. Schmoke earned an undergraduate degree in history from Yale University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
Robert R. Bowie, a lawyer who established what is now the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University, died Nov. 2 of respiratory failure at Blakehurst Retirement Community in Towson. He was 104. The son of Clarence Keating Bowie, a Baltimore lawyer, and Helen Richardson Bowie, a homemaker, Robert Richardson Bowie was born in Baltimore and raised on Calvert Street and in Guilford. After graduating in 1927 from the Gilman School, Mr. Bowie earned a bachelor's degree in 1931 from Princeton University and his law degree in 1934 from Harvard Law School.
FEATURES
By Dave Rosenthal | March 27, 2013
I was saddened to read the obituaries for Anthony Lewis, the Pultizer Prize-winning reporter, columnist and author. He may be most familiar for his decades of work at the New York Times. But his book, "Gideon's Trumpet," was one of the first -- and best -- examples of literary journalism, which has flourished in the half-century that has followed its publication. In classic story-telling style, it explored a landmark Supreme Court case that granted legal representation to the poor, and was a forerunner of more current works such as Jon Krakauer's "Into Thin Air" or Rebecca Skloot's "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 18, 2012
The political world is a-twitter about the president's recent statements on the condition of the economy. You know, the one where President Barack Obama said the private sector is "doing fine. " Well, that one was not received in the way it was intended. In fact, it generated so much ridicule that a few hours later the president again took to the public stage in order to correct his initial assessment. The subsequent damage control statement did little to calm the political waters, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2012
When she was 12 years old, Christina Lewis Halpern was caught in the collision between great good fortune and terrible luck. And the suddenness and severity of the impact jolted her deeply, though it would take years for her to experience the full effects. And yet, after the pioneering African-American businessman Reginald F. Lewis died of a brain tumor on Jan. 19, 1993, just seven weeks after the disease was diagnosed, his youngest daughter took pains to conceal her shock. She didn't cry. Instead, she reacted by becoming responsible and very quiet.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Julie Baughman, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2011
Not too many of Adam Braskich's classmates at Harvard Law School this fall will have spent an afternoon quite like this. On a sweltering day inside a South Baltimore apartment, he stood over the body of an elderly man that was discovered by a friend. Trying to discern the man's identity and find his family, the officer and a medic picked through his possessions, looking for anything that might help. Another medic rushed out, overcome by the stench. Braskich, a 26-year-old native of Illinois who double-majored in criminal justice and philosophy at the University of Maryland, College Park, said he's enjoyed the past three years in the city's diverse neighborhoods, getting to know residents and drug dealers alike.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein announced Thursday the launch of a new "Major Investigations Unit" devoted to dealing with violent repeat offenders — a criminal class that was key to his campaign last year. "Research and data reveal that a relatively small number of violent, repeat offenders commit a disproportionately large amount of the violent crime," Bernstein said in a statement. "By strategically and aggressively pursuing, prosecuting and imprisoning these individuals, we will have a dramatic impact on the level of violence in the city, and as a result make Baltimore a safer place to live and work.
NEWS
April 29, 2011
Why should President Obama have to show his birth certificate to prove he is an American citizen when other presidents have not been asked to show theirs? It seems that Donald Trump and all the other doubters are sideshow carnival barkers making much ado about nothing. Now that the world has seen the document, the naysayers will continue to doubt the president's authenticity as much as they always have. As for Mr. Trump's calling Obama's acceptance into Harvard Law School unfair because of his family income, that is ludicrous.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2011
Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein announced Thursday the launch of a new "Major Investigations Unit" devoted to dealing with violent repeat offenders — a criminal class that was key to his campaign last year. "Research and data reveal that a relatively small number of violent, repeat offenders commit a disproportionately large amount of the violent crime," Bernstein said in a statement. "By strategically and aggressively pursuing, prosecuting and imprisoning these individuals, we will have a dramatic impact on the level of violence in the city, and as a result make Baltimore a safer place to live and work.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Of all the things in the hundreds of thousands of pages of Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan's paper trail, the one she may regret the most when her Senate confirmation hearing opens today is a 1995 University of Chicago Law Review article about the very process she's about to undergo. She argued that high court confirmation hearings had become useless "lovefests" between question-dodging nominees and compliant senators. The hearings revealed "far too little" about the nominees' views about the law and the constitution, she wrote.
NEWS
August 8, 2010
With her confirmation by the Senate as a U.S. Supreme Court justice, Elena Kagan becomes only the fourth woman ever to serve on the nation's highest court. At 50, the former Harvard Law School dean and Obama administration solicitor general can look forward to decades on the bench, where we hope she'll be a moderating force on a court that, like the Senate that confirmed her 63-to-37, has become increasingly polarized in recent decades. Justice Kagan's swearing-in Saturday marks the first time that three female justices will sit on the court concurrently, and she brings impeccable credentials and a wealth of experience to the job, though she has never served as a judge.
NEWS
June 28, 2010
Of all the things in the hundreds of thousands of pages of Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan's paper trail, the one she may regret the most when her Senate confirmation hearing opens today is a 1995 University of Chicago Law Review article about the very process she's about to undergo. She argued that high court confirmation hearings had become useless "lovefests" between question-dodging nominees and compliant senators. The hearings revealed "far too little" about the nominees' views about the law and the constitution, she wrote.
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