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NEWS
December 6, 1999
William G. Anderson, 83, Harvard administratorWilliam G. Anderson, a former administrator at Harvard College and an avid sailor who designed his yachts, died of cancer Thursday at home in Blakehurst Life Care Community in Towson. He was 83.Mr. Anderson lived in Baltimore for the past six years after marrying the former Dorothy M. Bergland. He also had homes in South Natick, Mass., and Biddeford Pool, Maine.For 17 years at Harvard University, he worked as the university marshal at undergraduate Harvard College, planning commencement ceremonies, said his wife.
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NEWS
October 16, 2013
Anybody who has ever encountered the college admissions process knows that there's no such thing as an even playing field. Most schools will admit that upfront. "Like all colleges," Harvard College notes on its own admissions web site, "we seek to admit the most interesting, able, and diverse class possible. " In other words, schools often try to balance out an incoming class with students who not only have good grades or high test scores but have had unusual life experiences as well as those they regard as "well rounded.
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NEWS
June 7, 2013
Anne D. Neal apparently thinks that because St. Mary's College of Maryland has been unable to fill 150 seats in its incoming freshman class, its curriculum must be flawed and its students ill-educated ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30). As a student of St. Mary's College of Maryland, I strongly disagree with Ms. Neal's stance, and I am appalled by the complete lack of basis on which she constructs her argument. In her commentary, Ms. Neal pulls her evidence of St. Mary's apparent failure in curriculum from the "American Council of Trustees and Alumni's 'What Will They Learn?
NEWS
June 7, 2013
Anne D. Neal apparently thinks that because St. Mary's College of Maryland has been unable to fill 150 seats in its incoming freshman class, its curriculum must be flawed and its students ill-educated ("Cautionary campus tale," May 30). As a student of St. Mary's College of Maryland, I strongly disagree with Ms. Neal's stance, and I am appalled by the complete lack of basis on which she constructs her argument. In her commentary, Ms. Neal pulls her evidence of St. Mary's apparent failure in curriculum from the "American Council of Trustees and Alumni's 'What Will They Learn?
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 8, 2000
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - When it comes to ripping off the Harvard empire, no scheme is too tiny or far-flung to keep Rick Calixto from ruthlessly crushing it. Take South Korea's Harvard English Academy. The language school draped "Harvard" banners on and off campus to catch the eye of potential students, at least some of whom surely wondered whether that famous overseas university had opened a branch there. Some of Harvard University's spies took note, too. They called Calixto, who, from his Harvard Square office, combats misuse of the university's trademarks.
NEWS
October 16, 2013
Anybody who has ever encountered the college admissions process knows that there's no such thing as an even playing field. Most schools will admit that upfront. "Like all colleges," Harvard College notes on its own admissions web site, "we seek to admit the most interesting, able, and diverse class possible. " In other words, schools often try to balance out an incoming class with students who not only have good grades or high test scores but have had unusual life experiences as well as those they regard as "well rounded.
FEATURES
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 1997
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- The first lady may have made a killing on the commodities market a few years back, but she and President Clinton might have to start playing Lotto if daughter Chelsea accepts an invitation to attend Harvard University.The annual price tag for tuition, room and board and other fees is breathtaking enough at an estimated $31,395.But that doesn't begin to cover the real cost of joining the Harvard Class of 2001. A freshman woman might be run out of Cambridge, for example, without a proper navel piercing ($53)
FEATURES
September 23, 2000
Today in history: Sept. 23 In 63 B.C., Caesar Augustus was born in Rome. In 1642, Harvard College in Cambridge, Mass., held its first commencement. In 1779, during the Revolutionary War, the American warship Bon Homme Richard defeated the HMS Serapis after the American commander, John Paul Jones, is said to have declared: "I have not yet begun to fight!" In 1780, British spy John Andre was captured along with papers revealing Benedict Arnold's plot to surrender West Point to the British.
NEWS
June 20, 2006
On June 18, 2006, JERROLD KELLEY COOK, (LT. CMDR. U.S.N.R.), a resident of Broadmead Retirement Community, Cockeysville, MD. Mr. Cook was born in Pittsburgh, PA, in 1916, lived in New York City and settled in Baltimore, MD. He graduated from Harvard College in 1938. He was the son of the late Thomas M. Cook, Jr, and Nathalie J. Kelley Cook. He worked for State Street Trust Company and Bethlehem Shipbuilding. Mr. Cook served during WWII aboard the USS Monterey, the USS Hoggart Bay and the USS Tarawa, holding the rank of Ensign to Lieutenant and was later promoted to Lieutenant Commander in the Naval Reserve.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
FRED JOSEPH, 72 Former Drexel Burnham CEO Fred Joseph, who as CEO of investment bank Drexel Burnham Lambert helped create the modern junk-bond market in the 1980s before the firm's collapse, has died. He was 72. Joseph died Friday at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center after a long fight with multiple myeloma. His death was announced by John F. Sorte, CEO of Morgan Joseph & Co., an investment bank Joseph helped found. Joseph, a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Business School, arrived on Wall Street in 1963, joining the corporate finance department of E.F. Hutton.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | November 8, 2000
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - When it comes to ripping off the Harvard empire, no scheme is too tiny or far-flung to keep Rick Calixto from ruthlessly crushing it. Take South Korea's Harvard English Academy. The language school draped "Harvard" banners on and off campus to catch the eye of potential students, at least some of whom surely wondered whether that famous overseas university had opened a branch there. Some of Harvard University's spies took note, too. They called Calixto, who, from his Harvard Square office, combats misuse of the university's trademarks.
NEWS
December 6, 1999
William G. Anderson, 83, Harvard administratorWilliam G. Anderson, a former administrator at Harvard College and an avid sailor who designed his yachts, died of cancer Thursday at home in Blakehurst Life Care Community in Towson. He was 83.Mr. Anderson lived in Baltimore for the past six years after marrying the former Dorothy M. Bergland. He also had homes in South Natick, Mass., and Biddeford Pool, Maine.For 17 years at Harvard University, he worked as the university marshal at undergraduate Harvard College, planning commencement ceremonies, said his wife.
FEATURES
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 18, 1997
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- The first lady may have made a killing on the commodities market a few years back, but she and President Clinton might have to start playing Lotto if daughter Chelsea accepts an invitation to attend Harvard University.The annual price tag for tuition, room and board and other fees is breathtaking enough at an estimated $31,395.But that doesn't begin to cover the real cost of joining the Harvard Class of 2001. A freshman woman might be run out of Cambridge, for example, without a proper navel piercing ($53)
NEWS
May 21, 1997
Following are commencement exercises scheduled in the Baltimore area this week:TodayUniversity of Maryland Baltimore County: Undergraduate exercises, 1 p.m. at Baltimore Arena. Speakers: Donna E. Shalala, U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services; Carl Djerassi, chemist, novelist and inventor of the birth-control pill; and valedictorian Juliana K. Sander.TomorrowThe Johns Hopkins University: Campus- wide ceremony at 9 a.m. in Gilman Quadrangle; speaker, Hopkins President William R. Brody.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
FRED JOSEPH, 72 Former Drexel Burnham CEO Fred Joseph, who as CEO of investment bank Drexel Burnham Lambert helped create the modern junk-bond market in the 1980s before the firm's collapse, has died. He was 72. Joseph died Friday at New York Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center after a long fight with multiple myeloma. His death was announced by John F. Sorte, CEO of Morgan Joseph & Co., an investment bank Joseph helped found. Joseph, a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Business School, arrived on Wall Street in 1963, joining the corporate finance department of E.F. Hutton.
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