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By Andrea Giampetro-Meyer and Karyl B. Leggio | September 19, 2013
After more than three years in the courts, Bank of America will pay $39 million to settle a gender bias case in its Merrill Lynch brokerage operation. The women who brought this suit allege executives at the brokerage favored male employees by giving them the more lucrative deal opportunities, the choice clients, and more frequent promotions and raises, and that women who complained experienced retaliation. The firm's history with minority employees is far from stellar. In the 1970s, the firm settled a suit and agreed to make its workforce more diverse; these initiatives were never fully implemented.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Rev. Dr. L. Carroll Yingling Jr., a retired United Methodist Church minister and former superintendent of the Baltimore Northwest District, died of cancer Aug. 23 at the Charlestown retirement community. He was 87. "He had a lot of strengths, and he loved the people wherever he served and they returned that love," said the Rev. Lon B. Chesnutt, a longtime friend who retired in 1999 from Hiss Memorial United Methodist Church in Parkville, where he had been pastor for many years.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2010
Marlin U. Zimmerman Jr., a retired chemical engineer and business consultant, died May 23 from complications of dementia at Genesis Healthcare in Easton. He was 86. Mr. Zimmerman was born in Akron, Ohio, and raised in Easton, where his father was principal of Easton High School and his mother was a homemaker. After graduating from Easton High School in 1940, he earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1944 from the Johns Hopkins University. In 1966, he earned a master's degree in business from the Harvard Business School.
NEWS
By Andrea Giampetro-Meyer and Karyl B. Leggio | September 19, 2013
After more than three years in the courts, Bank of America will pay $39 million to settle a gender bias case in its Merrill Lynch brokerage operation. The women who brought this suit allege executives at the brokerage favored male employees by giving them the more lucrative deal opportunities, the choice clients, and more frequent promotions and raises, and that women who complained experienced retaliation. The firm's history with minority employees is far from stellar. In the 1970s, the firm settled a suit and agreed to make its workforce more diverse; these initiatives were never fully implemented.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | February 28, 2012
Comptroller Peter Franchot wants Maryland schools to teach financial literacy. Maybe they should start with regular literacy, as even those at the top echelons of government in this state do not understand basic grammar. The former head of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, Prince George's County's Ulysses Currie, successfully relied on an "I am dumb" legal defense to explain in federal court why he didn't follow simple ethics rules about reporting outside income. The latest politician to fall prey to grammar is Senate Majority Leader Rob Garagiola, a lawyer who is running for the Democratic nomination for the 6th District congressional race.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Morton "Jerry" Baum, founder and executive director of the Fund for Educational Excellence and a retired clothing manufacturing executive who was a tireless champion of city public schools, died May 5 from complications of Parkinson's disease at his Roland Park home. He was 87. "I first met Jerry in the 1980s when he was executive director of the Fund for Educational Excellence," said Brian C. Rogers, chairman of T. Rowe Price, who had served as a member of the organization's board.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Rev. Dr. L. Carroll Yingling Jr., a retired United Methodist Church minister and former superintendent of the Baltimore Northwest District, died of cancer Aug. 23 at the Charlestown retirement community. He was 87. "He had a lot of strengths, and he loved the people wherever he served and they returned that love," said the Rev. Lon B. Chesnutt, a longtime friend who retired in 1999 from Hiss Memorial United Methodist Church in Parkville, where he had been pastor for many years.
NEWS
By Newsday | July 8, 1991
COLOMBIA'S uneasy truce with its drug lords points more urgently than ever to the need for the United States to find a domestic solution to the drug problem. The awesome influence of the narcotics cartels is spreading well beyond the initial coca-growing nuclei of Colombia, Peru and Bolivia across South America. Using Harvard Business School principles, the drug lords are expanding their enterprises to control everything from leaf production and paste processing to port shipments and financing.
NEWS
January 21, 1991
Richard C. Bernard Jr., former management consultant and chairman of the Foreign Trade Data Users Group, died Tuesday of cardiac arrest at New York Hospital. He was 66 and a resident of New York City for the past 30 years.A mass of Christian burial for Mr. Bernard was being offered today at St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 5502 York Road.Born and raised in Baltimore, he attended Boys Latin School and was a graduate of Harvard University and the Harvard Business School.Mr. Bernard served in the Army during World War II. He was cited for bravery while in Okinawa and received the Silver Star.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1997
Info workers: More people work in the information business than any other industry, according to the Kensington Technology Group of San Mateo, Calif. Kensington reports that two of every three U.S. workers are classified as information workers, or those who use technology to regularly complete work functions. It reports that 84 million Americans use a PC at home or work every day and 58 percent use a computer for doing company work at home.Making the leap: Star performers can become lousy managers if they aren't well prepared for the transition.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2013
Morton "Jerry" Baum, founder and executive director of the Fund for Educational Excellence and a retired clothing manufacturing executive who was a tireless champion of city public schools, died May 5 from complications of Parkinson's disease at his Roland Park home. He was 87. "I first met Jerry in the 1980s when he was executive director of the Fund for Educational Excellence," said Brian C. Rogers, chairman of T. Rowe Price, who had served as a member of the organization's board.
NEWS
Marta H. Mossburg | February 28, 2012
Comptroller Peter Franchot wants Maryland schools to teach financial literacy. Maybe they should start with regular literacy, as even those at the top echelons of government in this state do not understand basic grammar. The former head of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, Prince George's County's Ulysses Currie, successfully relied on an "I am dumb" legal defense to explain in federal court why he didn't follow simple ethics rules about reporting outside income. The latest politician to fall prey to grammar is Senate Majority Leader Rob Garagiola, a lawyer who is running for the Democratic nomination for the 6th District congressional race.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2010
Marlin U. Zimmerman Jr., a retired chemical engineer and business consultant, died May 23 from complications of dementia at Genesis Healthcare in Easton. He was 86. Mr. Zimmerman was born in Akron, Ohio, and raised in Easton, where his father was principal of Easton High School and his mother was a homemaker. After graduating from Easton High School in 1940, he earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1944 from the Johns Hopkins University. In 1966, he earned a master's degree in business from the Harvard Business School.
NEWS
March 3, 1998
Todd Duncan,95, the baritone who created the role of Porgy in Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess" and was the first black singer to join the New York City Opera, died Saturday at his home in Washington.He was known for his elegant phrasing and burnished tone and his dramatic persuasiveness. Those qualities won him his debut role at the New York City Opera in 1945, when he sang Tonio in a production of Leoncavallo's "Pagliacci." His City Opera debut made him the first black singer to perform opera with a white cast.
NEWS
May 20, 2003
Joseph Winton Getzendanner Jr., a retired banker, died of heart failure Thursday at his Newtown, Pa., home. He was 89. Born in Baltimore and raised in Govans, he graduated in 1929 from Polytechnic Institute. He earned an economics degree at Duke University and a master's degree at Harvard Business School. He had been controller of Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., and retired in 1976 as a vice president of National City Bank in Cleveland. Services will be held at 11:30 a.m. Thursday at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Rock Hall.
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