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NEWS
January 30, 2005
On January 27, 2005, JOHN T., beloved husband of the late Miriam E. (nee Harner); devoted father of David C. Hartwig, John T. Hartwig, Jr., Gary L. Hartwig, and Stephen A. Hartwig; dear friend of Margaret Riedeman; devoted grandfather of David C. Hartwig, Jr., Karen Ann Cecchi, John T. Hartwig III, Terri L. Dwyer and Eric S. Hartwig. Also survived by five great-grandchildren. A Christian Wake Service will be held at the Lassahn Funeral Home Inc., 7401 Belair Road, on Sunday at 4 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated in St. Clement Church on Monday at 10:30 A.M. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery.
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SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun reporter | October 6, 2006
Albert Haynesworth had a reputation for angry outbursts long before he crossed the line of good judgment and common decency in Nashville, Tenn. In 2003, as a second-year defensive tackle with the Tennessee Titans, he kicked teammate Justin Hartwig in the chest at the conclusion of a practice play. As a sophomore at the University of Tennessee, he once fought with a teammate in practice, left the field and, according to the Associated Press, returned with a metal pole looking for the player.
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NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Navy's apology yesterday to the family of the sailor whom officials implicated in the deadly explosion aboard the USS Iowa raised hopes that legal claims may be settled soon and more than two years of anguish brought to an end."I'm optimistic, in light of the apology and the Navy's admission ,, that the accusation shouldn't have been made, that the next step should be for us to sit down and discuss this rationally to arrive at a fair settlement," said Kreig J. Brusnahan, attorney for the family of Petty Officer 2nd Class Clayton M. Hartwig, a gunner's mate.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2005
Anyone who's ever flown on a commercial plane knows the drill. As the plane approaches the airport, the pilot gets on the public address system. He or she typically tells a bad joke and then thanks everyone for flying the airline. Then he lists all the gates where passengers can meet connecting flights and gives a brief weather report. How does the pilot know all that - the gates, the weather, the status of the runway? The answer is that he communicates with crews on the ground. And those communications wouldn't be possible without ARINC, a privately held company based in Annapolis that handles 90 percent of the communication between pilots and the ground nationally and 70 percent worldwide.
NEWS
By New York Times | October 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Navy, revising its findings about the 1989 explosion that killed 47 sailors aboard the battleship Iowa, has concluded after months of tests and analysis that it does not have definitive proof of sabotage, say Navy officials.The new findings, which were to be announced today by Adm. Frank B. Kelso II, the chief of naval operations, overturn the Navy's earlier conclusion that the explosion was probably an act of suicidal sabotage by a despondent sailor.Investigators say a precise explanation for the blast will never be known, but Kelso's conclusions implicitly discredit a Navy criminal investigation that focused on the sailor, Clayton M. Hartwig, a gunner's mate second class, as the culprit.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | October 18, 1991
AIKEN, S.C. -- Between calls to his attorney, Kendall Truitt turned his head toward the television set and watched a replay of the USS Iowa's No. 2 gun turret exploding in a big gray-white puff.For the past 2 1/2 years, Truitt has tried to remove that image from his mind as the Navy accused his best friend, sailor Clayton Hartwig, of causing an April 1989 explosion that killed 47 crewmen, including Hartwig.Yesterday, acknowledging the blast's cause might never be determined, the Navy formally apologized to Hartwig's family in Cleveland.
NEWS
By New York Times | October 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Navy, revising its findings about the 1989 explosion that killed 47 sailors aboard the battleship Iowa, has concluded after months of tests and analysis that it does not have definitive proof of sabotage, say Navy officials.The new findings, which were to be announced today by Adm. Frank B. Kelso II, the chief of naval operations, overturn the Navy's earlier conclusion that the explosion was probably an act of suicidal sabotage by a despondent sailor.Investigators say a precise explanation for the blast will never be known, but Kelso's conclusions implicitly discredit a separate Navy criminal investigation that focused on the sailor, Clayton M. Hartwig, a gunner's mate second class, as the culprit.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2001
AS SOON AS Suzanne Hartwig began her first lift in this year's Women's National Power Lifting Championships, she knew it was going to be a good day. Her training sessions had been going well, and she felt strong. And when she started her lifting, everything came together. By the end of the day Jan. 20, the Crofton resident had earned her medal as national champion in the 114-pound weight class. This wasn't Hartwig's first experience as a power-lifting champion. Since she started lifting weights in 1991, she has earned six national championships - four in the 105-pound category and two in the 114-pound class.
NEWS
By New York Times | October 21, 1991
TWO AND A HALF years after the explosion aboard the battleship Iowa that killed 47 sailors, the event remains a tragic mystery. What changed dramatically Wednesday was that the Navy acknowledged it could live with the mystery. No closer to a definitive explanation, it announced that it had repudiated its original charge that one of the crewmen who died was responsible.The evidence, some of it washed overboard as survivors cleaned up and attended to the dead and injured, remains bafflingly incomplete.
NEWS
October 19, 1991
The Navy has at last revised its official verdict on the tragic explosion aboard the battleship Iowa. Careful investigations of the prevailing conditions inside the ship's 16-inch gun mount, the ammunition bags used to feed the cannon and the equipment used to load it have led to the conclusion that in all probability the fatal blast was an accident.Since 1989, naval officers have stoutly maintained the explosion could have been caused by only sabotage. A mean-spirited probe of the friendship of two Iowa sailors, Clayton M. Hartwig and Kendall L. Truitt, resulted in charges that Petty Officer Hartwig, who died, had sparked the blast in a despondent suicide.
NEWS
January 30, 2005
On January 27, 2005, JOHN T., beloved husband of the late Miriam E. (nee Harner); devoted father of David C. Hartwig, John T. Hartwig, Jr., Gary L. Hartwig, and Stephen A. Hartwig; dear friend of Margaret Riedeman; devoted grandfather of David C. Hartwig, Jr., Karen Ann Cecchi, John T. Hartwig III, Terri L. Dwyer and Eric S. Hartwig. Also survived by five great-grandchildren. A Christian Wake Service will be held at the Lassahn Funeral Home Inc., 7401 Belair Road, on Sunday at 4 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated in St. Clement Church on Monday at 10:30 A.M. Interment Gardens of Faith Cemetery.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2001
AS SOON AS Suzanne Hartwig began her first lift in this year's Women's National Power Lifting Championships, she knew it was going to be a good day. Her training sessions had been going well, and she felt strong. And when she started her lifting, everything came together. By the end of the day Jan. 20, the Crofton resident had earned her medal as national champion in the 114-pound weight class. This wasn't Hartwig's first experience as a power-lifting champion. Since she started lifting weights in 1991, she has earned six national championships - four in the 105-pound category and two in the 114-pound class.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - While his wife and the other sprinters postured and preened, C. J. Hunter and the other big men in the shot put promised that their event would be one of the most compelling at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials. They delivered. Hunter is the husband of Marion Jones, and he does not appreciate being called "Mr. Jones." He also had to play second fiddle last night, as Adam Nelson popped the throw of his life, 72 feet, 7 inches, in the sixth and final round to win the event and set a trials record.
SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 28, 1999
EUGENE, Ore. -- Rules and injuries made this a national meet without a prime-time showdown, but yesterday's finale of the USA Track and Field Championships was a compelling show for the brunch-hour crowd of 8,913 at Hayward Field.From the 9: 50 a.m. start of the pole vault, which included a U.S. record of 19 feet, 9 inches by Jeff Hartwig, to the 1: 20 p.m. finish of the women's 5,000 meters, in which Regina Jacobs became the meet's only double winner, this was the sport at its up-tempo best.
NEWS
By New York Times | October 21, 1991
TWO AND A HALF years after the explosion aboard the battleship Iowa that killed 47 sailors, the event remains a tragic mystery. What changed dramatically Wednesday was that the Navy acknowledged it could live with the mystery. No closer to a definitive explanation, it announced that it had repudiated its original charge that one of the crewmen who died was responsible.The evidence, some of it washed overboard as survivors cleaned up and attended to the dead and injured, remains bafflingly incomplete.
NEWS
October 19, 1991
The Navy has at last revised its official verdict on the tragic explosion aboard the battleship Iowa. Careful investigations of the prevailing conditions inside the ship's 16-inch gun mount, the ammunition bags used to feed the cannon and the equipment used to load it have led to the conclusion that in all probability the fatal blast was an accident.Since 1989, naval officers have stoutly maintained the explosion could have been caused by only sabotage. A mean-spirited probe of the friendship of two Iowa sailors, Clayton M. Hartwig and Kendall L. Truitt, resulted in charges that Petty Officer Hartwig, who died, had sparked the blast in a despondent suicide.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2005
Anyone who's ever flown on a commercial plane knows the drill. As the plane approaches the airport, the pilot gets on the public address system. He or she typically tells a bad joke and then thanks everyone for flying the airline. Then he lists all the gates where passengers can meet connecting flights and gives a brief weather report. How does the pilot know all that - the gates, the weather, the status of the runway? The answer is that he communicates with crews on the ground. And those communications wouldn't be possible without ARINC, a privately held company based in Annapolis that handles 90 percent of the communication between pilots and the ground nationally and 70 percent worldwide.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2000
SACRAMENTO, Calif. - While his wife and the other sprinters postured and preened, C. J. Hunter and the other big men in the shot put promised that their event would be one of the most compelling at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials. They delivered. Hunter is the husband of Marion Jones, and he does not appreciate being called "Mr. Jones." He also had to play second fiddle last night, as Adam Nelson popped the throw of his life, 72 feet, 7 inches, in the sixth and final round to win the event and set a trials record.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder | October 18, 1991
AIKEN, S.C. -- Between calls to his attorney, Kendall Truitt turned his head toward the television set and watched a replay of the USS Iowa's No. 2 gun turret exploding in a big gray-white puff.For the past 2 1/2 years, Truitt has tried to remove that image from his mind as the Navy accused his best friend, sailor Clayton Hartwig, of causing an April 1989 explosion that killed 47 crewmen, including Hartwig.Yesterday, acknowledging the blast's cause might never be determined, the Navy formally apologized to Hartwig's family in Cleveland.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Navy's apology yesterday to the family of the sailor whom officials implicated in the deadly explosion aboard the USS Iowa raised hopes that legal claims may be settled soon and more than two years of anguish brought to an end."I'm optimistic, in light of the apology and the Navy's admission ,, that the accusation shouldn't have been made, that the next step should be for us to sit down and discuss this rationally to arrive at a fair settlement," said Kreig J. Brusnahan, attorney for the family of Petty Officer 2nd Class Clayton M. Hartwig, a gunner's mate.
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