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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 14, 1992
GRACE HARTIGAN had just skirted disaster -- a fire that might have destroyed an estimated $1 million-plus of her art and works by friends such as Willem de Kooning. But as usual she was looking forward, not back. "The first thing an artist wants is to get the studio together and get back to work," she said yesterday.The internationally recognized artist and Maryland Institute instructor was speaking in the wake of a fire Sunday that had temporarily driven her out of her studio at Broadway and Eastern Avenue.
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By Tim Smith | November 17, 2009
If you didn't know that this is National Opera Week, a glance at the local scene would make you suspect something of the kind. Three companies in Baltimore alone will be busy with performances; add in College Park and Washington, and it looks like an epidemic. The designation of Nov. 13 to 22 as National Opera Week (easier to market than National Opera Ten-Day Period) was made by Opera America, the service organization representing about 150 companies, and the National Endowment for the Arts.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | November 4, 1993
"When you know how to do it," Grace Hartigan said not lon ago, "it's time to move on." The exhibit of her recent work $H opening today at Grimaldis shows that she knows how to do it, all right.For some years now the artist has been spattering her images with paint in a somewhat pointillist-inspired way. This results in works that visually vibrate with life and in which a dialogue is established between the representational and the abstract, as well as the surface of spatters and the image behind it.In this style, the artist has created what are considered some of her best works in decades, and the ones at Grimaldis show her in complete mastery of it. These are enormously accomplished works in which one can see her even playing with the style, emphasizing now this and now that.
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By Tim Swift | November 15, 2009
BOOKS 'Going Rogue' by Sarah Palin: She's baaack! The former VP candidate/hockey mom launches her media blitz for her new book this week, sitting down with big names like Oprah and Barbara Walters. (Somehow, Katie Couric was left off the list.) Will the book be a groundbreaking political memoir? Probably not. But will America be strangely transfixed? You betcha. In stores Tuesday. EXHIBIT 'Terra Cotta Warriors': One of the most astonishing archaeological discoveries of the 20th century is coming to Washington this week.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 9, 2001
This month will see no less than three important exhibitions of one of Baltimore's most distinguished painters. Grace Hartigan, who came to Baltimore from New York in the 1960s, is showing her most recent oils and watercolors at C. Grimaldis Gallery. And both the ACA Galleries in New York City and the Neuberger Museum of Art at the State University of New York in Purchase have organized major retrospectives of her work. Hartigan, who established her reputation in New York during the 1950s, has been called a second-generation Abstract Expressionist, though the term doesn't quite seem to fit her. The first-generation Ab-Exers, like Jackson Pollock, Clyfford Still and Barnett Newman, created the characteristic style of "all-over" paintings that were largely non-representational and in which no part of the canvas was any more important than another.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | May 24, 2005
Renowned Baltimore painter Grace Hartigan returns to C. Grimaldis Gallery this month with a delightful exhibition of works on paper spanning her career from the 1950s to the present. Hartigan is well known as a painter; she made her reputation as a pioneering abstract-expressionist in New York during the 1950s, when her peers included artists like Jackson Pollack, Robert Motherwell and Willem de Kooning. The Grimaldis exhibition presents vivid examples of how Hartigan successfully translated the Ab-Exers' signature "all-over" style to works on paper rather than canvas.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | April 5, 2006
Painter Grace Hartigan, whose latest works are on view this month at C. Grimaldis Gallery, traces her artistic roots back to the abstract-expressionist movement of the 1950s, when her contemporaries included such giants as Jackson Pollack, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Franz Kline and Philip Guston. But Hartigan, 84, has outlived all of them, as well as the heyday of America's first internationally important art movement, and chances are that she will be remembered as much for being a pioneer of all that followed as for her initial contributions as an Ab-Exer.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | April 2, 1992
Grace Hartigan's "Another Hunt," one of the best works in her new show at C. Grimaldis Gallery, takes us on a little trip through the history of modern art while remaining thoroughly Hartigan and thoroughly contemporary.Its horses and riders remind us of Degas, but there's something about the principal rider's black hat and formal air that speaks of Manet. The spattering of yellow paint that seems to hover over the surface can, of course, recall Seurat's pointillism, but the yellow and the brilliant red riders' coats combine to suggest the dazzle of impressionist dabs of brightness.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | July 29, 2004
The summer show at C. Grimaldis Gallery is always a lively affair, being a recapitulation of artists we've come to know in previous exhibitions and an intriguing taste of what's in store when the fall season arrives. This year's show is as varied and elegant as ever, with many beautiful and poignant paintings by Grace Hartigan, Raoul Middleman, Eugene Leake and Henry Coe. Coe's modestly scaled landscapes of the French countryside, in particular, are marvels of pastoral quietude. A highlight of this show is two recent, large-scale color photographs by Athens-based artist Dimitra Lazaridou, whose virtuosic control of composition and color signals a major evolution in this gifted photographer's work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 24, 2005
The former students of Baltimore's renowned resident painter Grace Hartigan are surely one of the most diverse groups of artists anywhere, each having taken something of their mentor's approach to painting while turning it to their own distinctive purposes. Maura Maguire, whose paintings are on view at Galerie Francoise, is a former Hartigan student whose densely layered images pick up on her teacher's fascination with mythological subjects but treat them in an altogether more figurative style than Hartigan's abstractions.
NEWS
November 18, 2008
Grace Hartigan, the renowned artist and educator who died over the weekend at the age of 86, was a painter's painter. "The thing that's been incredible is that one way or another, I've been able to arrange my life so that I could paint every day," she told The Sun in a 2001 interview. "I have great plans to live as long as Georgia O'Keeffe," she added. Ms. O'Keeffe lived to 98, and Ms. Hartigan said she needed the time because "there's a lot of work I still want to do." Ms. Hartigan was not granted that wish, but what she accomplished over a career spanning more than six decades was little short of astonishing.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | November 17, 2008
Before she passed away Saturday after a long illness, Grace Hartigan was adamant, even imperious about the arrangements for how she would be memorialized. And she will get her way, as Hartigan, a seminal figure in the U.S. art world and a longtime Baltimore resident, usually did. "There will be no memorial service. She said that her memorial should be more about her body of work than about her physical body. She's always felt that way," says Rex Stevens, chairman of the drawing and general fine arts department at the Maryland Institute College of Art. The 86-year-old painter will be cremated, he said.
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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Her bold canvases made her a bright star in the 1950s New York art world, but she "sank from view faster than the Titanic" when she moved to Baltimore, The New York Times said. Grace Hartigan, who ultimately found a second career offering her wisdom and advice to generations of young painters at the Maryland Institute College of Art, died of liver failure yesterday at the Lorien Mays Chapel nursing home. She was 86. "I feel that I am an aristocrat as far as painting is concerned; I believe in beautiful drawing, in elegance, in luminous color and light," she said in a 1990 biography.
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By Ed Gunts | September 19, 2008
The Maryland Institute College of Art will hold the world premiere of a 36-minute documentary about Maryland artist and educator Grace Hartigan at 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at the Brown Center, 1301 Mount Royal Ave. Grace Hartigan - Shattering Boundaries, features studio interviews with Hartigan, the director of MICA's Hoffberger School of Painting since 1965, and artists she has influenced over the years. The reservations-only event includes a question-and-answer session with co-producers Janice Stanton and Alice Shure of Amici Films, as well as a reception.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | December 19, 2007
What do Josephine Baker, Amelie Matisse and Lili Marlene have in common? Aside from their aura of European sophistication and glamour, they're all featured subjects in New Paintings, a lively exhibition of recent work by Baltimore master Grace Hartigan at C. Grimaldis Gallery. Over the years, Hartigan has repeatedly returned for inspiration to famous women from history, legend and the history of art. She was a leading member of the New York School of Abstract-Expressionist painters during the 1950s, and her subsequent work remains an inventive mix of delightful human forms and pure abstraction.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND | June 17, 2006
Kevin Hartigan runs the South Asia office for Catholic Relief Services, but he was in Baltimore this week checking in with the people at the headquarters building on West Fayette Street. His visit coincided with the release of the latest Pew Global Attitudes Survey, which found that anti-American feeling has grown even more pronounced over the past year - something that he and every American living abroad has to contend with. The survey asked people in 15 countries, including India, all sorts of questions - about threats to peace, the war on terror, the Middle East conflict and the Iranian nuclear program.
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By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 29, 2004
It may seem odd that renowned Baltimore painter Grace Hartigan, who made her reputation as an abstract expressionist (flat, flat, flat!) in New York in the 1950s, today is mentor to any number of younger artists who (gasp!) actually like figures, perspective and the subtle interplay of light and shadow. But Hartigan, who directs the Hoffberger School of Painting at the Maryland Institute College of Art, says there's no mystery at all about her involvement with painters who've chosen paths very different from her own. "I'm known for the tremendous variety of people that come out of Hoffberger," she said.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | October 4, 1990
CHICAGO -- Democratic gubernatorial candidate Neil Hartigan, who has been doing a fair imitation of Ronald Reagan and George Bush in their no-new-taxes campaign promises of 1984 and 1988, has decided to put just about all his eggs in that basket.Trailing Republican Jim Edgar, the Illinois secretary of state, going into the summer, Hartigan first unleashed a series of television ads that single-mindedly hammered at Edgar as a politician who would tax Illinoisans as a first resort to meet the state's educational problems.
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By GLENN MCNATT and GLENN MCNATT,SUN ART CRITIC | April 5, 2006
Painter Grace Hartigan, whose latest works are on view this month at C. Grimaldis Gallery, traces her artistic roots back to the abstract-expressionist movement of the 1950s, when her contemporaries included such giants as Jackson Pollack, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Franz Kline and Philip Guston. But Hartigan, 84, has outlived all of them, as well as the heyday of America's first internationally important art movement, and chances are that she will be remembered as much for being a pioneer of all that followed as for her initial contributions as an Ab-Exer.
NEWS
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | April 2, 2006
WHEN GRACE HARTIGAN WAS A LITTLE girl, she was bewitched by gypsies. In the 1930s, the Travelers still roamed the countryside in nomadic caravans, and young Grace would shinny up the apple tree in her parents' backyard in Newark, N.J., to spy on them. She spent hours watching the women in colorful skirts and big hoop earrings telling fortunes, the men sharpening their knives. GRACE HARTIGAN: PORTRAITS FROM THE MASTERS, NEW PAINTINGS / / Exhibit runs through April 29 / / C. Grimaldis Gallery, 523 N. Charles St. / / Admission is free / / Call 410-539-1080 or visit cgrimaldisgallery.
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