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Hart Miller Island

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NEWS
December 30, 2009
The port of Baltimore has sent its last haul of dredge material from the Baltimore Harbor and Chesapeake Bay channels to Hart-Miller Island, and the spit of land near the Back and Middle rivers in Baltimore County will enter the final phase of its conversion into a wildlife refuge and recreational area. Some 100 million cubic yards of material has been formed into 1,100 acres during the past 25 years. The island is now home to more than 200 species of birds, other animals and plants. Thousands of people also use it for boating, fishing, camping and other activities.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2014
Maryland State Police today released more details about Sunday's helicopter crash that left two people with minor injuries at Hart-Miller Island near Essex. The helicopter, a Brantley B-2B, experienced a mechanical problem Sunday afternoon, state police said in a news release. The pilot told police that he tried to troubleshoot the problem but could not identify it, and the helicopter made a "hard landing," rolling onto its left side. The pilot and a passenger were uninjured aside from a few "bumps and scratches," according to Baltimore County police spokesman Cpl. John Wachter.
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NEWS
June 10, 1996
RESIDENTS of Southeast Baltimore County and recreational boaters feel betrayed. A decade ago, state officials said they would never again use Hart-Miller Island as a dumping ground for dredged material from Baltimore's shipping channel in the bay. But as dredging demands grew and possible disposal sites dwindled, port leaders saw their options evaporate. It was back to Hart-Miller, or watch the port slowly die.Raising the dike of the containment cell on the north side of Hart-Miller Island to 44 feet will buy time -- 12 years' worth.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Driving the back roads that hug the periphery of Maryland's shoreline, there is no singular characteristic that defines the homes. The ones that date back to summer-only retreats are usually one-story clapboard structures with the give-away air conditioning unit in a window or two. Some are two-story, farmhouse styles. Many are built with their backs to the Chesapeake Bay or its tributaries. While many of this style remain, there is a new kind of construction on the block: multistory, year-round homes, with the back of the home boasting sheets of glass in a variety of casements that frame the major attraction: the water.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1996
The popular beach on Hart-Miller Island -- where a flotilla of boaters frolics on summer weekends -- is steadily eroding, and officials unveiled a plan last night to save it that would cost up to $1.5 million.At an informational meeting at Sparrows Point High School, three plans were offered that basically would halt the erosion by building stone breakwaters off the recreational area.The options -- intended to prevent 10 feet of erosion a year at the island's south end -- include:* Five stone breakwaters each 450 feet long and 450 feet offshore.
NEWS
April 4, 1997
NEARLY A YEAR AGO, residents of southeast Baltimore County felt dismayed and betrayed when state officials announced they would dump an additional 30 million cubic yards of spoil dredged from Baltimore shipping channels on Hart-Miller Island.The state had little choice. The Port of Baltimore's survival depends on scooping up 4 million cubic yards of muck annually so ships can navigate its channels. With no immediate site alternatives, the state had to return to Hart-Miller as a short-term answer.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | September 6, 1998
Rich and Jackie Miller float side by side on their inflatable lounge chairs, sun lotion in the cup holder, holding hands and doing little more than breathing and bobbing."
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2002
Not long ago, the south end of Hart-Miller Island was an oozing moonscape of muck dredged from Baltimore's harbor and Chesapeake Bay shipping channels. But it was a birder's paradise. Ornithologists recorded 277 species of birds feasting on the worms and other squiggly creatures in the mud on the oval-shaped island in the bay between Back and Middle rivers. But the 3 million cubic yards of black goo pumped through the dikes annually between 1984 and 1990 has dried to shades of beige, hardened and cracked.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 19, 2000
Swimming has been banned at Hart-Miller Island, the third beach in eastern Baltimore County to be closed this month because of high levels of fecal coliform bacteria. Officials said yesterday that the beach at Hart-Miller Island will be closed through at least the middle of next week, when additional test results are received. Hart-Miller Island, located in the Chesapeake Bay near the mouth of the Middle River, is a popular boating destination. Officials said boating, including kayaking, canoeing and operating personal watercraft, will be allowed.
NEWS
By a Sun Reporter | January 9, 2008
Workers dredging in the Baltimore Harbor Monday afternoon discovered a cannonball that might date to the Civil War era off Hart-Miller Island near eastern Baltimore County, according to the Maryland state fire marshal's office. The 25-pound ball was described as in "very good condition" and was still explosive, according to Deputy Chief Jason Mowbray. Bomb experts with the state fire marshal's office rendered the ordnance safe, Mowbray said. He declined to elaborate on the procedure. The fire marshal's office was called about 4 p.m. Monday after a private contractor disposing of dredged material on Hart-Miller Island discovered the cannonball in the muck being deposited.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2012
The Maryland Port Administration is completing its initial review of a multimillion-dollar proposal that would turn Baltimore harbor shipping channel muck into bucks. The plan might eventually replace time-tested dredge disposal methods of piling sediment along the waterline or using it to plug holes in eroding bay islands with a factory that bakes the goo into concrete aggregate for construction. Baltimore would be the first port to use the process. "We're getting ready to take the next step and it's an important step for Maryland," said port commissioner Ted Venetoulis.
MOBILE
By Meekah Hopkins, Special To The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
An inside look at Baltimore party boat culture You probably shouldn't be reading this right now. According to my husband, I should be telling you that the idea of a Baltimore Boating Culture is a myth. A lie. Who would want to swim in that dirty, radioactive water? Middle River? How … mediocre. Dundalk - just leave it right there. People don't want to know about the hours spent playing floating beer pong with friends on the water, or the countless dock bar parties, live music and sandy beaches.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins, Special To The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2012
You probably shouldn't be reading this right now. According to my husband, I should be telling you that the idea of a Baltimore Boating Culture is a myth. A lie. Who would want to swim in that dirty, radioactive water? Middle River? How … mediocre. Dundalk - just leave it right there. People don't want to know about the hours spent playing floating beer pong with friends on the water, or the countless dock bar parties, live music and sandy beaches. Or how to get an ocean -perfect tan 20 minutes from the city - instead of three hours.
NEWS
December 30, 2009
The port of Baltimore has sent its last haul of dredge material from the Baltimore Harbor and Chesapeake Bay channels to Hart-Miller Island, and the spit of land near the Back and Middle rivers in Baltimore County will enter the final phase of its conversion into a wildlife refuge and recreational area. Some 100 million cubic yards of material has been formed into 1,100 acres during the past 25 years. The island is now home to more than 200 species of birds, other animals and plants. Thousands of people also use it for boating, fishing, camping and other activities.
NEWS
By a Sun Reporter | January 9, 2008
Workers dredging in the Baltimore Harbor Monday afternoon discovered a cannonball that might date to the Civil War era off Hart-Miller Island near eastern Baltimore County, according to the Maryland state fire marshal's office. The 25-pound ball was described as in "very good condition" and was still explosive, according to Deputy Chief Jason Mowbray. Bomb experts with the state fire marshal's office rendered the ordnance safe, Mowbray said. He declined to elaborate on the procedure. The fire marshal's office was called about 4 p.m. Monday after a private contractor disposing of dredged material on Hart-Miller Island discovered the cannonball in the muck being deposited.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2002
Not long ago, the south end of Hart-Miller Island was an oozing moonscape of muck dredged from Baltimore's harbor and Chesapeake Bay shipping channels. But it was a birder's paradise. Ornithologists recorded 277 species of birds feasting on the worms and other squiggly creatures in the mud on the oval-shaped island in the bay between Back and Middle rivers. But the 3 million cubic yards of black goo pumped through the dikes annually between 1984 and 1990 has dried to shades of beige, hardened and cracked.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1999
Hart-Miller Island, known best as a haven for boaters and a storage site for Chesapeake Bay dredge spoil, is about to get a face lift.About 10,000 trees are being planted on Hart-Miller Islands Natural Resource Area by an environmental group using volunteers who are sailing to the island in state work boats each day this week.Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, a Towson-based environmental group, has arranged for about 20 volunteers to be shuttled to the island each day to plant seedlings on the south side of the island, where dredge material was hauled up from the bay and dumped about 20 years ago, said Ryan Davis, program director for the alliance.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1996
State officials yesterday underscored the urgency of finding dredge disposal sites, but they quickly discovered that, among lawmakers, the perennially unpopular subject is still fraught with political, environmental and financial concerns.A key element of the Glendening administration plan for dredge disposal -- the restoration of Poplar Island -- ran into immediate trouble when lawmakers were told the cost ultimately could reach $350 million.But even a far less costly solution, to pump dredge material into the bottom of the Chesapeake Bay, also encountered sharp hostility from environmentalists, watermen and Eastern Shore lawmakers.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 19, 2000
Swimming has been banned at Hart-Miller Island, the third beach in eastern Baltimore County to be closed this month because of high levels of fecal coliform bacteria. Officials said yesterday that the beach at Hart-Miller Island will be closed through at least the middle of next week, when additional test results are received. Hart-Miller Island, located in the Chesapeake Bay near the mouth of the Middle River, is a popular boating destination. Officials said boating, including kayaking, canoeing and operating personal watercraft, will be allowed.
NEWS
November 16, 1999
A MAJOR obstacle looms before the port of Baltimore's revival effort: dredging. Finding a place to dump the sandy silt is highly controversial. But as former port Director Tay Yoshitani put it, "Dredging is our license to compete." Four million cubic yards of the stuff must be removed each year from Baltimore's 50-foot shipping channel, which extends 126 miles to the mouth of the Chesapeake. Another 18 million cubic yards of material will be dredged in the next several years to make important safety improvements in the shipping channels.
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